Town of Clifton Park, NY
Saratoga County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[Added 3-16-2015 by L.L. No. 4-2015]

§ 208-20 Introduction.

1. 
The Clifton Park Town Center Plan.
A.  
In 2011, the Town of Clifton Park sought to develop a consensus vision for the look, feel and function of a future "Town Center" in its existing Exit 9 commercial area. Funding for this effort was provided by the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC).
B.  
Town officials, with the assistance of planning consultants, worked to imagine how this neighborhood could evolve over time with redevelopment into a more-attractive mixed-use commercial center of activity. The goal was to create a rich atmosphere which was pedestrian and bicycle friendly and the "heart" of the community.
C.  
Two public workshops were held to invite local residents, business owners and landowners to discuss what they would like to see. The result of these dialogs was used to shape a guidance document titled "The Clifton Park Town Center Plan," which was adopted in April of 2012.
2. 
How and why this code was created.
A.  
It was understood that in order to realize the ideas and visions outlined in the Clifton Park Town Center Plan, the existing zoning for this area of town would need to be reconstructed, and consensus built among local residents and property owners about how it should work. A form-based zoning approach was chosen because it utilizes graphics to explain what the desired form and appearance of development should be with an eye toward creating beautiful places and a streamlined development review process which encourages revitalization. With the assistance of additional funding by the CDTC, the follow-up work was commenced in 2013 to develop a new form-based zoning code which would allow and encourage the type of redevelopment outlined in the Town Center Plan.
B.  
Two additional public workshops were held to discuss the specific ideas and approaches to this form-based zoning. The input received from the public, Town officials, landowners and business owners was used to shape this new zoning code.
C.  
It is our hope that this work will, over time, help the Clifton Park Town Center to evolve into a vibrant, attractive, mixed-use shopping destination for all to enjoy.

§ 208-21 Administration.

1. 
Purpose and applicability.
A.  
Purpose. The purpose of this form-based zoning code is to enable, guide and implement many of the ideas and visions outlined in the adopted Clifton Park Town Center Master Plan, specifically:
(1) 
Enable and encourage property reinvestment through renovations, expansions, redevelopment, and new construction to strengthen the private sector position and tax base;
(2) 
Create a more-vibrant center of activity throughout the day and night with a reasonable mix of commercial and residential uses supporting one another;
(3) 
Provide an attractive mix of green lawns, park space, shade trees, multi-use paths, activity areas and civic uses for the public enjoyment;
(4) 
Allow for additional housing types and opportunities;
(5) 
Replace the visual prominence of large parking lots with attractive architecture, public spaces and sidewalks to create a more bicycle and pedestrian friendly commercial center with connections to adjacent residential neighborhoods;
(6) 
Encourage more-efficient use of land area with multistory buildings which utilize shared parking and structured parking;
(7) 
Encourage improved stormwater management with reduced impervious surface, raingardens, shared stormwater retention areas and other latest industry practices; and
(8) 
Provide an easy-to-understand and predictable code through the use of illustrated building form standards and architectural guidelines which will create the desired types of development and streamline the review and approval process.
B.  
Applicability. This code applies to all new development, renovations, redevelopment, changes of use and site plan approvals within the Town Center Zoning Districts, as identified on the Town of Clifton Park Zoning Map.
(1) 
Any building permit or site plan approval issued before the date of adoption, or subsequent amendment, of this chapter (reference § 208-97, Nonconforming land, structures and uses) shall remain in effect, except as noted below.
(a) 
Project approvals issued under this code shall expire if a building permit is not issued for such project within two years, or construction has not commenced within five years, of the date of approval.
(b) 
Applicants who have received project approvals prior to the date of adoption of this chapter may still choose to comply with this code voluntarily.
(c) 
Approval under this form-based code does not eliminate review requirement for construction plan submittals for a building permit per Town Code § 208-107 or other required permits or approvals.
2. 
Standards vs. guidelines.
This code includes both standards which are required to be met, as well as guidelines which are encouraged, but not enforced. As such, provisions designated as "shall" or "will" are required, while provisions designated as "should" are encouraged.
3. 
Planning Board authority to modify dimensional standards.
Recognizing that this form-based code is being applied to a highly developed area, it is anticipated that strict compliance with every dimensional standard may not always be practical or necessary to meet the purposes of this chapter. (See § 208-22, Subsection 9, Preferred incremental change.) In such cases, the Planning Board is therefore authorized to modify the dimensional standards set forth to the extent necessary and appropriate to accommodate existing limitations with a super-majority vote (majority plus one), provided all of the following findings are made by the Planning Board in rendering it's decision that such modification:
A.  
Is necessary to reasonably accommodate existing site constraints or development limitations; and
B.  
Does not create an undue adverse effect on abutting properties or uses; and
C.  
Does not increase the number of stories of a building; and
D.  
Does not conflict with the intent of the standard being waived or modified; and
E.  
Allows for an improvement that will add to the overall vitality of the Town Center area and advances the purposes of this chapter of the Town Code.
4. 
Conflicts and severability.
In the event of a conflict with this article and other sections of the Town Zoning Code the provision of this article shall apply. In the event of a conflict between diagrams or illustrations and the written text of this chapter, the written text shall apply. Should any provision of this chapter be declared illegal or unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction to the extent that the other provisions of this chapter can be implemented without such illegal or unconstitutional provision, such other provisions shall remain in effect.
5. 
Administrative authority.
A.  
Administrative review. The Planning Director is hereby authorized to undertake the administrative review and approval of the following types of applications and shall coordinate such review with any other Town Code review requirements with the Zoning Enforcement Officer, emergency responders, and highway or other agency officials as/if deemed necessary by the Planning Director:
(1) 
Construction or modification of parking lot areas affecting 10 spaces or fewer;
(2) 
Fences, landscape walls and berms, awnings;
(3) 
Stormwater management improvements of 5,000 square feet or less;
(4) 
Lot line adjustments;
In addition, the Planning Director is hereby authorized to undertake the administrative review and approval of certain project applications, subject to the following thresholds and conditions:
(5) 
Additions of no more than 2,500 square feet to existing buildings located 500 feet or more from an abutting residential district;
(6) 
Simple renovations such as door and window changes, re-siding, re-roofing, and enclosing entryways;
(7) 
Compliance with conditions of approval as specified in a prior written decision of the Planning Board;
(8) 
Minor amendments to development applications previously approved by the Planning Board where the proposed amendment otherwise qualifies for administrative review and will not substantively alter any findings of fact or Planning Board decision and related conditions of approval; and
(9) 
Transit node of no more than two bus pull-off spaces or 10 automobile parking spaces.
B.  
Further delegation by the Planning Board. In addition to administrative review and approval authorized above, the Planning Board may authorize the administrative review and approval of additional applications where such delegation of authority is permitted by law and is specified in writing in the Planning Board's Rules of Procedure with clearly specified thresholds and conditions under which the Planning Board classifies an application as eligible for administrative review. The thresholds and conditions shall be structured such that no new development shall be approved that results in a substantial adverse impact under any of the standards set forth in the bylaws. No amendment issued as an administrative review shall have the effect of substantively altering any of the findings of fact or Planning Board decision.
C.  
Consent agenda. The Planning Board may require that administrative review applications be placed on a consent agenda at the next Planning Board meeting. As part of the consent agenda process, the Planning Board may review and modify the administrative review of the Planning Director or otherwise approve any items on the consent agenda as a group or individually.
6. 
Administrative vs. design development review.
A.  
Applications reviewed for compliance with this chapter may be either approved through administrative review or shall be approved through design development review (DDR). The purpose of administrative review is to streamline the approval process where possible for smaller or more-straightforward applications.
B.  
The Planning Director is authorized to administratively review and approve all applications which clearly conform to all the applicable principles and standards of this chapter, or to deny approval if it does not conform. Applications which are denied may reapply after appropriate modification, and/or the applicant may request a full design development review instead.
C.  
If the Planning Director determines that an application requires interpretation or discretionary judgment with respect to compliance with the standards and guidelines of this chapter, the application shall be referred to a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), hereby established.
(1) 
The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) shall consist of: the Chairperson (or Vice Chairperson) of the Planning Board, a Director of Building and Development, the Planning Director and the Planning Board Attorney. This review committee may be augmented as deemed necessary by the Planning Director with other Town officials and the Town-designated engineer (TDE) and Town-designated design professional (TDP) consulting firms.
(2) 
A checklist of required submission review materials necessary at the different stages of the review process is provided in the Appendix.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See 280-29, Appendix.
7. 
Review and approval process.
A.  
Schematic conference. At the very early stages of concept design, prior to developing any detailed architectural/engineering drawings or filing a formal application, the applicant shall schedule an informal (preapplication) schematic conference with the Planning Director to discuss the general project intentions and review the code and it's procedures. The purpose of this conference is early detection of any potential design or other concerns before the applicant has expended time and funds on design and engineering plans which may require significant changes.
(1) 
A request for a schematic conference shall be accompanied by a very basic site schematic/layout plans and a copy of any additional information the applicant wishes to discuss.
(2) 
After the conference, the Planning Director will provide to the applicant a preliminary list of recommendations related to the development plans, such as: variances or permits required; initial design feedback; guidance on which types of technical studies may be necessary; and identification of any TDE/TDP review that might be necessary before approvals can be granted.
(3) 
If it is determined that the application would qualify for administrative review as submitted, or with only minor modifications, the Planning Director shall inform the applicant, within 30 days, of what additional steps, changes, forms and fees would be required to submit a formal application. Once submitted, the formal application may be approved, approved with modifications or denied as part of administrative review. Other applications shall proceed to the concept development meeting.
B.  
Design development review.
(1) 
Concept development meeting. After the schematic conference, the applicant shall prepare additionally revised design plans, including any suggested modifications, required studies and information requested in the previous meeting. Once prepared, the applicant shall submit these materials to schedule an informal concept development meeting with the TAC.
(a) 
If it was determined that an escrow account should be established to cover the review fees by private consulting TDE or TDP firms, such account shall be set up and funded by the applicant prior to the meeting.
(b) 
The TAC, including any additional review members deemed necessary by the Planning Director, shall review and discuss the proposed project at the meeting with the applicant. The purpose of this meeting is early detection of any potential design concerns before the applicant has expended significant time and funds on final design and engineering for full Planning Board review.
(c) 
After the concept development meeting, the Planning Director will provide to the applicant a nonbinding list of recommendations related to the design plans and meeting discussion, follow up with the TDE/TDP as/if required, as well as identify if the application is ready to proceed to formal design development review and the next steps in the review and approval process.
(2) 
Formal application and design development meeting. Formal applications for design development review shall be submitted to the Planning Director along with any required plans, forms, fees and studies.
(a) 
Any required variances or special use permits shall be obtained prior to or in parallel with the formal application process.
(b) 
The Planning Director shall refer a copy of the application to the Saratoga County Planning Board for review under New York General Municipal Law 239-m for projects that cause a physical change in access to a state or county highway.
(c) 
Applications shall be reviewed for completeness. The Planning Office will notify the applicant if his/her/its application is complete or not and identify any missing information which must still be submitted. The applicant must submit the requested information within 60 days of notification or the application will be deemed withdrawn, forfeiting any application fees.
(d) 
Complete applications will be forwarded to the appropriate Town departments or review consultants to verify consistency with this chapter.
(e) 
The Planning Board shall approve, approve with modifications, or deny the application within 60 days from submission/completion of the SEQR process, in writing to the applicant, detailing the findings/determinations for its decision.
C.  
Public hearing. A public hearing shall be required for any project that is categorized as a Type 1 action pursuant to the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act and its implementing regulations prior to final decision by the Planning Board on a design development review. The Planning Board may but is not otherwise obligated to require a project that is not a Type 1 action to have a public hearing.

§ 208-22 Regulating Plan.

1. 
Regulating Plan interpretation.
The Regulating Plan is intended as a general guide to the desired future development patterns within the Town Center. To provide for design creativity and flexibility, some elements of the plan are intended only as a suggested outcome and should not be interpreted literally or strictly required. These include:
A.  
The location and extent of public/open space.
B.  
The location of future new roads, service alleys, multi-use paths, transit stops and recommended tower designs.
2. 
Other elements of the Regulating Plan, however, are intended to be maintained as shown, as follows:
A.  
The location and boundaries of each development zone TC1 thru TC6, and the Design Overlay.
B.  
The general location or orientation of required storefronts, where they provide direct facade frontage along a public or private street.
3. 
Zones.
The Clifton Park Town Center Zoning hereby establishes the following development zones, as shown on the Regulating Plan and the Town of Clifton Park Zoning Map, as amended herein:
A.  
TC6 - Boulevard. The Boulevard Zone is intended to define the character of the primary boulevard through the Town Center. This boulevard is designed to showcase the large lawns, shade trees, planted medians and a multi-use path as a "parklike" setting, fronted on either side by continuous shopfronts, sidewalks and outdoor patios. Bisecting Route 146 with gateway median designs and architectural tower elements, it seeks to attract visitors into the Town Center neighborhood. Mixed-use buildings up to five stories, with residential dwelling units only permitted above commercial space.
B.  
TC5 - Neighborhood. The Town Center Neighborhood Zone is intended to be the core pedestrian shopping area and mixed-use neighborhood. A network of side streets with wide sidewalks, street trees and commercial shopfronts served by on-street parking, hidden parking lots and garages tucked within the center of the blocks. Three-story mixed-use buildings, with residential dwelling units only permitted above commercial space. Provides incentives to permit up to five-story buildings in return for providing structured parking.
C.  
TC4 - Transition. The Transition Zone is intended to create a transitional zone to outlying areas of the Town Center and neighboring residential areas. Three-story buildings with primarily commercial office uses, with some limited retail and residential uses.
D.  
TC3 - General. The General Zone is intended to allow for more suburban lot configurations of commercial and office uses along the Route 146 corridor which would not be suitable for the central neighborhood portions. Three-story buildings.
E.  
TC2 - Edge. The Edge Zone is intended to create a transitional zone between the central commercial districts and the outlying residential areas with lower-intensity development and shorter building heights. Three-story buildings, primarily residential in nature, but does allow for some limited supporting commercial uses as part of the development.
F.  
TC1 - Highway. The Highway Zone is intended to allow for more suburban lot configurations of commercial and office uses along the Northway corridor which would not be suitable for the central neighborhood portions. Emphasis is placed on providing attractive architecture which will be viewed from both the front and the back, with increased tree buffers, landscaping and architectural standards along the Northway frontage to maintain an attractive presence along the highway.
G.  
OS - Open Space. The Open Space Zone represents the goal of providing attractive landscaped or natural areas with trees, landscaping and buffers where possible which will enhance the overall visual appeal of the Town Center for the benefit of everyone. This zone is intended to suggest and promote areas for small parks, trails, open lawns, watershed management and recreational areas for the future use and enjoyment of shoppers and residents. This zone is not intended to require any specific property to be set aside as open space. Green lawns, shade trees, playgrounds, picnic areas, multi-use paths and attractive landscaping are to be considered as goals and determined on a project basis during development review. Once designated on an approved plan, no commercial or residential uses are permitted. The Open Space Zone boundaries are representational of the amount and general location of open space, buffer or amenity area to be set aside from a Master Plan perspective. The actual location, extent, design, level of improvement and management (public, private, nonprofit) shall be determined as part of the design development review for the parcel(s).
H.  
DO - Design Overlay. The Design Overlay is an overlay district to address areas outside of the original Town Center Master Plan that are logical extensions of the Town Center area but which have not been master-planned. Development projects in this area are required to go through the full design development review process in order to ensure proper development. A collaborative design development review process under the Design Overlay shall include the property owner(s)/contract vendee, the Town Technical Advisory Committee, the Town-designated engineer, and the Town-designated design professional to determine how to best advance the recommendations of the Clifton Park Town Center Master Plan and the project development plan. The permitted uses of the underlying zoning districts may be modified through the planned development district process pursuant to the objectives of Article XI, Planned Development Districts. This collaborative process shall include consideration for connecting Moe Road to Maxwell Road Extension, multi-use pathway connections to Moe Road, Collins Park and to the Clifton Park-Halfmoon Library and set aside of approximately 30% of the property as public open or civic space, which may include multipurpose paths, connector roads, green infrastructure/stormwater management areas, and pocket parks and greens. The underlying zone designation per the Regulating Plan will not become effective until conclusion of the full design development review process.
[Amended 11-9-2015 by L.L. No. 12-2015]
4. 
Allowable uses.
A.  
The allowable uses in each development zone are as set forth in Table 3-1, Allowed Uses.
TABLE 3-1 Allowed Uses
Use Type(See Definitions)
TC6
Boulevard
TC5
Neighborhood
TC4
Transition
TC3
General
TC2
Edge
TC1
Highway
Commercial
Animal, pet grooming
Animal, veterinary services
Assembly or auditorium, indoor
Automotive, fuel sales
Automotive, service or wash
Automotive, sales
Bank
Bank, drive-thru
Bar or tavern
Club, live performance
Club, indoor
Commercial amusement, indoor
Dry cleaning
Home occupation
Hotel
Laundromat
Medical services, outpatient
Office
Personal care
Repair and maintenance, light
Restaurant
Restaurant, drive-thru
Restaurant, outdoor seating
Retail
Retail, drive-thru
Retail, outdoor display
Residential
Nursing home
Residence, multifamily
Residence, mixed-use multifamily
Senior housing
Civic/Public
Cultural center
Day-care home
Municipal office or public safety facility
Parking, structured above-grade
Parking, structured below- or at-grade
Public open space or park
Religious facility
School, nursery or K-12
School, vocational
Transit node
Transit hub
Utility, telecommunication tower
Utility, general public service
Notes:
=
Use permitted
=
Special permit.
Uses not listed, or blank cells, indicate use not permitted. Some not-permitted uses are still listed in order to avoid ambiguity with similar functions. See 280-22, Subsection 5, for special permit use considerations.
5. 
Special permit uses.
A.  
Bank, drive-thru. Bank drive-thrus, including drive-up ATMs and freestanding kiosks, shall be located at the rear of the building and screened from view as directed by the Planning Board. Drive-thru facilities are encouraged to utilize one curb cut where possible.
B.  
Home occupation. The home shall be the actual place of residence of the person conducting the home occupation and:
(1) 
The applicant shall provide an affidavit setting forth the scope of operations proposed and demonstrate that there will be no noise, odor, smoke, glare or vibration beyond the property line. The Planning Board shall make appropriate findings with respect to location, intensity of use, parking and any other factors that may affect neighboring properties and may require specific performance standards to limit impacts to adjacent properties with regard to air quality, noise, visual impact, emissions, and other reasonable concerns that may be applicable to the use.
(2) 
There shall be no more than one home occupation per residential building, and no more than two employees may be permitted.
(3) 
The use, including related storage, may occupy no more than 25% of the habitable floor area of the existing principal residence or no more than 500 square feet in the principal residence.
(4) 
The home occupation shall not involve the outdoor display of any materials or goods.
(5) 
The home occupation shall not involve the on-site use or storage of any commercial vehicles or construction equipment or mechanical equipment except for one vehicle not over 6,000 pounds.
C.  
Personal care. Personal care services are permitted in the TC2 Zone by special permit as an accessory use, provided that all such establishments are limited to no more than 1,500 square feet of gross floor area or 10% of the total building footprint area, whichever is greater.
D.  
Retail. Retail uses are permitted in the TC2 Zone by special permit as an accessory use, provided that all such establishments are limited to no more than 2,000 square feet of gross floor area or 10% of the total building footprint area, whichever is greater.
E.  
Retail, drive-thru. Retail establishments with drive-thru services shall locate such service at the rear of the building and screened from view as directed by the Planning Board. Drive-thru facilities are encouraged to utilize one curb cut where possible.
F.  
Retail, outdoor display. The outdoor display or storage of retail merchandise shall be limited to business hours. The display of motorized vehicles or equipment, such as lawnmowers, snowblowers, ATVs, snowmobiles and similar items, is not permitted in the TC6 Zone.
G.  
Restaurant, drive-thru. Restaurant establishments with drive-thru services shall locate such service at the rear of the building and screened from view as directed by the Planning Board. Drive-thru facilities are encouraged to utilize one curb cut where possible.
H.  
Parking, structured above-grade. Above-grade parking structures shall be screened from view behind primary buildings, false facades or otherwise concealed in appearance through design measures as follows:
(1) 
A minimum of 40% of the exterior surface area of the garage facades facing a public way or sidewalk shall be clad in materials such as brick, stone, green-wall (e.g., ivy), decorative metalwork, wood trim or other materials as approved by the Planning Board in lieu of bare structural concrete or masonry, to present an attractive appearance.
(2) 
In addition to any other perimeter landscaping used or required, trees shall be planted at regular intervals to align with openings in the structure along facades facing a public street or highway.
(3) 
All parking and security lighting shall be provided from fully shielded, downward-facing lamps which direct the light only into the immediate parking areas as required for use.
6. 
Residential density.
A.  
The allowable base residential density within the Town Center shall not exceed 10 dwelling units per acre, exclusive of undevelopable lands, up to a maximum of 50 dwelling units per project.
B.  
Additional residential density above the allowable base levels may be permitted, with Town Board approval, provided the applicant provides for the design and/or construction of additional amenities within the Town Center for the use and enjoyment of the general public. The amenities shall include provisions for on-site and/or off-site improvements beyond those required to service the needs of the subject project.
C.  
These amenities may include the following, or a combination thereof, but are not limited to:
(1) 
A parking garage or deck, where not less than 50% of the parking spaces provided are available to the public (minimum 100 spaces).
(2) 
Recreational areas such as a public park or playground, maintained by the applicant, which is designed as an integral part of the development, readily visible and accessible from the public way, not less than 1/4 acre in size.
(3) 
Residential housing facilities for persons of low to moderate income.
(4) 
A stormwater retention or detention pond which captures or mitigates local stormwaters within or from the Town Center boundaries.
(5) 
A reduction in overall impervious surface area on the site, resulting in a substantive decrease in stormwater runoff.
(6) 
Payment of funds provided to the Town in lieu of or in combination with proposed amenities of a sum to be determined by the Town Board, which shall be deposited in a fund exclusively for community benefits or improvements within the Town Center.
D.  
The public amenities proposed must be commensurate, in the judgment of the Town Board, with the requested density increase before they may be approved. Consideration may be based on each additional residential unit above the base density per 3,000 square feet of improvements, or other criteria the Town Board may establish in a separate amenity schedule which outlines equivalent reimbursements.
7. 
Structured parking incentive.
A.  
In order to encourage the creation of structured parking within the Town Center, development proposals which include a structured parking garage or deck may qualify for additional building heights within the TC5 Zone, as follows:
(1) 
The structured parking provided must accommodate 100% of the required on-site parking needs for the uses on the additional floors; and
(2) 
Twenty percent of all on-site parking provided must be open and readily accessible to the public, above and beyond the parking required to service the needs of the subject project; and
(3) 
Any structured parking provided within the footprint of the building but less than six feet above grade shall not be counted against the limits for overall building height or number of stories.
8. 
Regulating Plan concepts explained.
A.  
Build-to line. The specific location on the property where the facade of the building must be placed, measured as a distance from the property line / public right-of-way (ROW). The amount of facade which must be placed along this line is explained as the frontage width percentage.
B.  
Build-to zone. Similar to the build-to line, this is a flexible area where the facade of a building must be located, measured as both a minimum and maximum setback distance from the property line / public right-of-way. The amount of facade which must be placed inside this zone is explained by the frontage width percentage.
C.  
Frontage width percentage. The recommended minimum percentage of the lot width which should be occupied by building facade along the build-to line or within the build-to zone. For example, a property which is 100 feet wide with a frontage width percentage of 60% should try to provide at least 60 feet of facade length in the build-to zone, where possible. Any additional length of front facade would be allowed to step back further from the street, if desired. The intent of this guideline is to encourage development to maximize the front facade exposure along the street where possible.
D.  
Corner lots. Buildings on corner lots defined by a build-to line or zone must locate both facades within the line or zone, extending a minimum of 30 feet in each direction from that corner of the building.
E.  
Setbacks. The minimum distance a building facade or parking area must be located from a property line or public right-of-way; similar to a build-to line or build to zone, except the building or parking can be located anywhere behind that line.
F.  
Building height. Building height is measured from the average front facade grade level to the mean height between the eaves and the roof peak (for sloped-roof structures) and to the top of the parapet (for flat-roof structures).
G.  
Facade transparency. The amount of window glass or other openings in the facade of a building, relative to the overall surface area of the facade. Ground-level pedestrian areas - particularly required shopfront areas - are required to have the highest levels of facade transparency, typically around 70% or more.
(1) 
Facade transparency is measured separately for the ground-floor levels and upper-floor levels. The ground-floor area is measured between two feet above the ground to 12 feet above the ground. Upper-floor areas are measured between 12 feet above the ground and the roof.
H.  
Required storefront. Areas indicated on the Regulating Plan for required storefront must meet minimum facade transparency requirements as well as include ground-floor shopfront windows to create an active and inviting pedestrian environment.
9. 
Preferred incremental change.
A.  
Understanding that much of the Clifton Park Town Center has already been developed, much of the future change will be occurring on properties which already have nonconforming structures on them. As they expand or renovate, it may not always be economically feasible or practical for them to fully meet the specific build-to requirements of this code. In such cases where small additions or expansion plans would otherwise fall short of full compliance of the minimum setback requirements, the Planning Board is authorized to limit or waive the dimensional requirements, provided that it is in keeping with the overall goals and intent of this code. (See description in 280-21, Subsection 3.) To illustrate how this is intended to work, the following examples are provided as a guide toward the intent and desire of this code to deal with such incremental change as the Town Center evolves over time.
B.  
Example. An existing building is located near the rear of the property, far away from the build-to zone (or build-to line) required for the property. The building owner seeks to build a small addition to this building; however the addition he/she/it seets to build would not be large enough to reach all the way up to the required build-to zone near the front of the lot.
C.  
Option One. The new addition is built off the side of the existing building (Figure 3.9). Even though the addition does not comply with the zoning by placing its front facade within the required build-to zone, this solution is an acceptable compromise because it does not increase the nonconformity of the original structure.
D.  
Option Two. The new addition is built off the front of the existing building, extending the front facade closer to the required build-to zone to the extent possible and practical (Figure 3.10). Even though the addition does not comply with the zoning by placing its front facade within the required build-to zone, this solution is acceptable because it decreases the nonconformity of the original structure. This solution is preferable to the previous one.
E.  
Option Three. The new addition is built off the front of the existing building, extending all the way up to the required build-to zone (Figure 3.11). This solution is preferable to the previous two because it reduces the nonconformity of the original structure and provides storefront facade up near the street and public sidewalk.
F.  
Option Four. A new building is constructed on the lot with the front facade within the build-to zone (Figure 3.12). This alternative is also preferred over the previous two options because the new building conforms to the zoning and it provides even more new storefront up close to the street and sidewalk.
G.  
Option Five. The new addition is constructed in the rear of the existing building (Figure 3.13). This solution is not acceptable because it increases the nonconformity of the original building and does not attempt to advance the concepts of the code.
H.  
Option Two - Future Expansion. Over time, as the Town Center slowly evolves with incremental changes, the small addition could be further expanded to provide more commercial space with additional facade frontage within the build-to zone (Figure 3.14). The new building would be in keeping with the original design intent and would be consistent with new development on the neighboring properties, creating the desired effect of the Town Center design.
I.  
Option Two - Future Build-Out. Eventually, the original building on the property could be removed and replaced with new facilities which provide even more commercial space (Figure 3.15). All structures on the property would then be in conformance with the code.

§ 208-22.1 Zone Overviews.

TC6 
Boulevard Zone Overview
208 FBC Zone Overview.tifThe primary intent of this zone is to create an attractive entrance and boulevard route into and through the Town Center neighborhood, as a transition from the larger Route 146 to the smaller side streets.
Along Clifton Country Road, a revitalized streetscape of trees, decorative lighting, landscaped multi-use path and sidewalks will be framed by inviting and attractive architecture. Existing front parking lots will gradually be transformed into attractive community and economic amenities, from outdoor patios and cafes to well-designed and interesting facades, where each building offers an attractive and inviting view of the ground-floor activities within. From storefront window displays, to outdoor dining areas amidst beautiful landscaping, as one travels from building to building and business to business, there is a continual offering of design elements to engage one's interest.
Illustrative example of buildings and site arrangements in the TC6 Boulevard Zone.
A.  
Form
Building Placement and Front Yard Design
Build-to Line (Distance from Property Line)
Front
41'
208 A.tif
Sidewalk width
8' min.
208 A1.tif
Landscaped Terrace width
15' min.
208 A2.tif
Multi-Use Path width
8' per NYSDOT Standards
208 A3.tif
Tree Lawn width
10' min.
208 A4.tif
Pedestrian Footway width
3' min. 5' max.
208 A5.tif
Side Street
0'
208 B.tif
Frontage Width % at BTL
Front
80% min. preferred
Side Street
30% min. preferred
Corner Properties: Both street facades must be built to the BTL for the first 30' from the corner of the building.
208 G.tif
Setback (Minimum Distance from Property Line)
Side
0'
208 C.tif
Rear
5'
208 D.tif
Lot Configuration
Width
150' min.
208 E.tif
Depth
300' min.
208 F.tif
Greenspace Goal
10% min.
Footprint
Depth, ground-floor commercial space
Main Building, 40' min.; Ancillary Building, 20' min.
Building Form
Height
Main Building
22' min.
208 H.tif
5 Stories max.1
208 H.tif
Ancillary Building
3 Stories max.1
Ground-Floor Finish Level
6" max. above sidewalk
208 I.tif
Ground-Floor Commercial Ceiling
14' min. clear
208 J.tif
Upper-Floor(s) Ceiling
9' min. clear
208 K.tif
1See definition of "Story" in Definitions
Allowed Building Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 1)
▪ Commercial Block
▪ Liner Building
▪ Civic Building
□ Live-Work Unit
□ Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
□ Townhouse/Rowhouse
▪ Drive Thru
Allowed Frontage Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 2)
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Use Types (See § 208-22, Subsection 4)
Ground Floor
Service, Retail, or Recreation, Education and Public Assembly
208 R.tif
Upper Floor(s)
Residential or Service
208 S.tif
B.  
Parking and Encroachments
Parking (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Location (Distance from Property Line)
Front Setback
80' min.
208 M.tif
Side Street Setback
5' min.
208 N.tif
Side Setback
0' min.
208 O.tif
Rear Setback
5' min.
208 P.tif
District Specific Parking Req. (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Drive Width
24' max. (2-way), 15' max. (1-way)
208 O.tif
No parking spaces are required for Ancillary Buildings that are < 500 sf.
Parking must be provided on-site, off-site within 1,300', or as part of a district-wide parking management strategy.
Allowed Encroachments (See § 208-24, Subsection 3)
Balconies, Bay Windows, Awnings, etc.
Front
12' max.
208 T.tif
Side Street
8' max.
208 U.tif
Rear
4' max.
208 V.tif
Miscellaneous
Only one Main Building and one Ancillary Building may be built on each lot.
Where a building facade steps back or is absent from the BTL, the BTL should be maintained and defined by fence, landscape wall or hedge 30"-54" high.
All buildings must have a primary entrance along the front facade.
Loading docks, overhead doors and other service entries shall not be located on street-facing facades.
A clear, designated pedestrian way(s) shall be provided from parking areas. Building entrance from parking areas shall provide attractive, welcoming architectural entry treatments.
TC5 
Neighborhood Zone Overview
208 FBC Zone Overview.tifThe primary intent of this zone is to become the core pedestrian shopping area and mixed-use neighborhood of the Town Center. Priority is placed here on optimizing the physical characteristics of the built environment for increased walkability. While much of the land encompassed by this district was originally built in an automobile-dominant format, the intent is to facilitate a transition of individual parcels over time, each adding up to a vibrant, walkable Town Center.
Characterized by a network of side streets and service alleys, providing wide sidewalks, street trees and commercial shopfronts served by on-street parking, with parking lots and garages hidden within the center of the blocks where possible. To maximize vibrancy and walkability, this zone features buildings located close to the sidewalk, plentiful shade for pedestrians, and parking lots screened from view. Three-story mixed-use buildings are permitted, with residential dwelling units only allowed above commercial spaces. Retail shopfronts are required along the ground-floor level of most areas.
This zone also allows for buildings up to four or five stories in height in return for providing structured parking which is available to the public.
Illustrative example of buildings and site arrangements in the TC5 Neighborhood Zone.
A.  
Form
Building Placement and Front Yard Design
Build-to zone (Distance from Property Line)
Front
0' min., 8' max.
208 A.tif
Side Street
0' min., 8' max.
208 B.tif
Building Facade at BTZ
Front
80% min. preferred
Side Street
30% min. preferred
Corner Properties: Both street facades must be built in the build-to zone for the first 30' from the corner of the building.
208 G.tif
Setback (Minimum Distance from Property Line)
Side
0' min.
208 C.tif
Rear
5' min.
208 D.tif
Lot Configuration
Width
100' min.
208 E.tif
Depth
150' min.
208 F.tif
Greenspace Goal
10% min.
Footprint
Depth, ground-floor commercial space
Main Building, 40' min.;
Ancillary Building, 20' min.
Building Form
Height
Main Building
22' min.
208 H.tif
3 Stories max.1
208 H.tif
Ancillary Building
3 Stories max.
Ground-Floor Finish Level
6" max. above sidewalk
208 I.tif
Ground-Floor Commercial Ceiling
14' min. clear
208 J.tif
Upper-Floor(s) Ceiling
9' min. clear
208 K.tif
14-5 story heights may be permitted with structured parking, see Structured Parking Incentive, § 208-22, Subsection 7.
Allowed Building Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 1)
▪ Commercial Block
▪ Liner Building
▪ Civic Building
▪ Live-Work Unit
□ Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
▪ Townhouse/Rowhouse
▪ Drive Thru
Allowed Frontage Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 2)
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Use Types (See § 208-22, Subsection 4)
Ground Floor
Service, Retail, or Recreation, Education and Public Assembly
208 R.tif
Upper Floor(s)
Residential or Service
208 S.tif
B.  
Parking and Encroachments
Parking (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Location (Distance from Property Line)
Front Setback
30' min.
208 M.tif
Side Street Setback
30' min.
208 N.tif
Side Setback
0' min.
208 O.tif
Rear Setback
5' min.
208 P.tif
District Specific Parking Req. (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Drive Lane Width
24' max. (2-way), 15' max. (1-way)
208 G.tif
No parking spaces are required for Ancillary Buildings that are < 500 sf.
Parking must be provided on-site, off-site within 1,300', or as part of a district-wide parking management strategy.
Allowed Encroachments (See § 208-24, Subsection 3)
Balconies, Bay Windows, Awnings, etc.
Front
12' max.
208 T.tif
Side Street
8' max.
208 U.tif
Rear
4' max.
208 V.tif
Miscellaneous
Only one Main Building and one Ancillary Building may be built on each lot.
Where a building facade steps back or is absent from the BTZ, the BTZ line should be maintained and defined by fence, landscape wall or hedge 30"-54" high.
All buildings must have a primary entrance along the front facade.
Loading docks, overhead doors and other service entries shall not be located on street-facing facades.
TC4 
Transition Zone Overview
208 FBC Zone Overview.tifThe primary intent of this zone is to provide a commercial area which acts as a transition to the surrounding residential neighborhoods around the Town Center.
Characterized by three-story buildings, this zone primarily allows office uses, with some mixed-use residential and limited retail uses, in order to limit the potential impact on the nearby residences. Among other adjusted details, buildings here are set slightly further back and heights are somewhat lower than those in the TC5 Neighborhood District.
Illustrative example of buildings and site arrangements in the TC4 Transition Zone.
A.  
Form
Building Placement and Front Yard Design
Build-to zone (Distance from Property Line)
Front
0' min., 15' max.
208 A.tif
Side Street
0' min., 15' max.
208 B.tif
Corner Properties: Both street facades must be built in the build-to zone for the first 30' from the corner of the building.
208 G.tif
Setback (Minimum Distance from Property Line)
Side
0' min.
208 C.tif
Rear
5' min.
208 D.tif
Lot Configuration
Width
100' min.
208 E.tif
Depth
150' min.
208 F.tif
Greenspace Goal
10% min.
Footprint
Depth, ground-floor commercial space
Main Building, 40' min.;
Ancillary Building, 20' min.
Building Form
Height
Main Building
22' min.
208 H.tif
3 Stories max.
208 H.tif
Ancillary Building
3 Stories max.
Ground-Floor Elev. Above Sidewalk
Comm. 6" max., Res. 24" min.
208 I.tif
Ground-Floor Commercial Ceiling
14' min. clear
208 J.tif
Upper-Floor Ceiling
9' min. clear
208 K.tif
Allowed Building Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 1)
▪ Commercial Block
▪ Liner Building
▪ Civic Building
▪ Live-Work Unit
□ Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
□ Townhouse/Rowhouse
▪ Drive Thru
Allowed Frontage Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 2)
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Use Types (See § 208-22, Subsection 4)
Ground Floor
Service, Retail, or Recreation, Education and Public Assembly
208 R.tif
Upper Floor(s)
Residential or Service
208 S.tif
B.  
Parking and Encroachments
Parking (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Location (Distance from Property Line)
Front Setback
30' min.
208 M.tif
Side Street Setback
30' min.
208 N.tif
Side Setback
0' min.
208 O.tif
Rear Setback
5' min.
208 P.tif
District Specific Parking Req. (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Drive Lane Width
24' max.(2-way), 15' max. (1-way)
208 O.tif
No parking spaces are required for Ancillary Buildings that are < 500 sf.
Parking must be provided on-site, off-site within 1,300', or as part of a district-wide parking management strategy.
Allowed Encroachments (See § 208-24, Subsection 3)
Balconies, Bay Windows, Awnings, etc.
Front
12' max.
208 T.tif
Side Street
8' max.
208 U.tif
Rear
4' max.
208 V.tif
Miscellaneous
Only one Main Building and one Ancillary Building may be built on each lot.
Where a building facade steps back or is absent from the BTZ, the BTZ line should be maintained and defined by fence, landscape wall or hedge 30"-54" high.
All buildings must have a primary entrance along the front facade.
Loading docks, overhead doors and other service entries shall not be located on street-facing facades.
TC3 
General Zone Overview
208 FBC Zone Overview.tifThe primary intent of this zone is to provide a general commercial area along the Route 146 corridor which primarily serves vehicular traffic and heavy vehicular uses. This zone allows for more suburban-oriented lot configurations and uses which would not be suitable for the central neighborhood portions of the Town Center. Building heights are capped at three stories. Residential uses are not permitted.
Illustrative example of buildings and site arrangements in the TC3 General Zone.
A.  
Form
Building Placement and Front Yard Design
Build-to zone (Distance from Property Line)
Front
38' min., 80' max.
208 A.tif
Sidewalk width
10' min.
208 A1.tif
Access Lane Parking width
8' for parallel, 16' for diagonal
208 A2.tif
Access Lane Drive width
12'
208 A3.tif
Access Lane Parking width
8' for parallel, 16' for diagonal
208 A4.tif
Multi-Use Path width
8' per NYSDOT Standards
208 A5.tif
Side Street
0'
208 B.tif
Street Facades must be built to the BTL for the first 30' from the corner of the property line.
208 G.tif
Setback (Minimum Distance from Property Line)
Side
0' min.
208 C.tif
Rear
5' min.
208 D.tif
Lot Configuration
Width
200' min.
208 E.tif
Depth
300' min.
208 F.tif
Greenspace Goal
15% min.
Footprint
Depth, ground-floor commercial space
Main Building, 40' min.; Ancillary Building, 20' min.
Building Form
Height
Main Building
22' min.
208 H.tif
3 Stories max.
208 H.tif
Ancillary Building
2 Stories max.
Ground-Floor Finish Level
6" max. above sidewalk
208 I.tif
Ground-Floor Commercial Ceiling
14' min. clear
208 J.tif
Upper-Floor(s) Ceiling
9' min. clear
208 K.tif
Allowed Building Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 1)
▪ Commercial Block
▪ Liner Building
▪ Civic Building
□ Live-Work Unit
□ Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
□ Townhouse/Rowhouse
▪ Drive Thru
Allowed Frontage Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 2)
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
▪ Porch
Allowed Use Types (See § 208-22, Subsection 4)
Ground Floor
Service, Retail, or Recreation, Education and Public Assembly
208 R.tif
Upper Floor(s)
Service
208 S.tif
B.  
Parking and Encroachments
Parking (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Location (Distance from Property Line)
Front Setback
60' min.
208 M.tif
Side Street Setback
5' min.
208 N.tif
Side Setback
0' min.
208 O.tif
Rear Setback
5' min.
208 P.tif
District Specific Parking Req. (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Drive Lane Width
24' max.(2-way), 15' max. (1-way)
208 O.tif
No parking spaces are required for Ancillary Buildings that are < 500 sf.
Parking must be provided on-site, off-site within 1,300', or as part of a district-wide parking management strategy.
Allowed Encroachments (See § 208-24, Subsection 3)
Balconies, Bay Windows, Awnings, etc.
Front
12' max.
208 T.tif
Side Street
8' max.
208 U.tif
Rear
4' max.
208 V.tif
Miscellaneous
Only one Main Building and one Ancillary Building may be built on each lot.
Where a building facade steps' back or is absent from the BTZ, the BTZ line should be maintained and defined by fence, landscape wall or hedge 30"-54" high.
All buildings must have a primary entrance along the front facade.
Loading docks, overhead doors and other service entries shall not be located on street-facing facades.
TC2 
Edge Zone Overview
208 FBC Zone Overview.tifThe primary intent of this zone is to provide a buffer to the residential neighborhoods on the outskirts of the Town Center. This zone allows three-story buildings, primarily residential in nature, but does permit some limited supporting commercial uses as part of the development.
Illustrative example of buildings and site arrangements in the TC2 Edge Zone.
A.  
Form
Building Placement and Front Yard Design
Build-to zone (Distance from Property Line)
Front
10' min., 15' max.
208 A.tif
Side Street
10' min., 15' max.
208 B.tif
Building Facade at BTZ
Front
50% min. preferred
Side Street
30% min. preferred
Street Facades must be built to the BTL for the first 30' from the corner of the property line.
208 G.tif
Setback (Minimum Distance from Property Line)
Side
8' min.
208 C.tif
Rear
5' min.
208 D.tif
Lot Configuration
Width
150' min.
208 E.tif
Depth
300' min.
208 F.tif
Greenspace Goal
15% min.
Footprint
Depth, ground-floor commercial space
Main Building, 40' min.; Ancillary Building, 20' min.
Building Form
Height
Main Building
22' min.
208 H.tif
3 Stories max.
208 H.tif
Ancillary Building
3 Stories max.
Ground-Floor Elev. Above Sidewalk
Comm. 6" max., Res. 24" min.
208 I.tif
Ceiling Height
9' min. clear
208 J.tif
Ground-Floor Commercial Ceiling
14' min. clear
208 K.tif
Allowed Building Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 1)
□ Commercial Block
▪ Liner Building
□ Civic Building
▪ Live-Work Unit
▪ Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
▪ Townhouse/Rowhouse
▪ Drive Thru
Allowed Frontage Types (See § 208-24, Subsection 2)
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
▪ Stoop
▪ Porch
Allowed Use Types (See § 208-22, Subsection 4)
Ground Floor
Service, Retail, or Recreation, Education and Public Assembly
208 R.tif
Upper Floor(s)
Residential
208 S.tif
B.  
Parking and Encroachments
Parking (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Location (Distance from Property Line)
Front Setback
35' min.
208 M.tif
Side Street Setback
35' min.
208 N.tif
Side Setback
0' min.
208 O.tif
Rear Setback
5' min.
208 P.tif
District Specific Parking Req. (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Drive Lane Width
24' max. (2-way), 15' max. (1-way)
208 O.tif
No parking spaces are required for Ancillary Buildings that are < 500 sf.
Parking must be provided on-site, off-site within 1,300', or as part of a district-wide parking management strategy.
Allowed Encroachments (See § 208-24, Subsection 3)
Balconies, Bay Windows, Awnings, etc.
Front
12' max.
208 T.tif
Side Street
8' max.
208 U.tif
Rear
4' max
208 V.tif
Miscellaneous
Only one Main Building and one Ancillary Building may be built on each lot.
Where a building facade steps back or is absent from the BTZ, the BTZ line should be maintained and defined by fence, landscape wall or hedge 30"-54" high.
All buildings must have a primary entrance along the front facade.
Loading docks, overhead doors and other service entries shall not be located on street-facing facades.
TC1 
TC1 Highway Zone Overview
208 FBC Zone Overview.tifThe primary intent of this zone is to facilitate autooriented highway commercial development along the Northway corridor which would be suitably viewed from both the front and rear, providing an attractive first impression of Clifton Park for those travelling along 1-87.
This zone allows for more suburban lot configurations and uses which would not be suitable in the central neighborhood zones, however emphasis is placed on increased landscaping and tree buffers and additional architectural standards along the Northway frontage to maintain an attractive presence along the Northway. Service areas of buildings are screened from view from the highway architecturally and/or with landscaping.
Illustrative example of buildings and site arrangements in the TC1 Highway Zone.
A.  
Form
Building Placement and Front Yard Design
Build-to zone (Distance from Property Line)
Front
30' min., 80'max.
208 A.tif
Sidewalk width
8'min.
208 A1.tif
Front parking lot
65' max.
208 A2.tif
Side Street
10' min., 30' max.
208 B.tif
Street Facades must be built in the BTZ for the first 30' from the corner of the property line.
208 G.tif
Setback (Minimum Distance from Property Line)
Side
0' min.
208 C.tif
Rear
40' min. including buffer of trees
208 D.tif
Lot Configuration
Width
No max.
208 E.tif
Depth
No max.
208 F.tif
Greenspace Goal
20% min.
Footprint
Depth, ground floor commercial space
Main Building, 40' min.; Ancillary Building, 20' min.
Building Form
Height
Main Building
22' min.
208 H.tif
3 Stories max.
208 H.tif
Ancillary Building
2 Stories max.
Ground-Floor Finish Level
6" max. above sidewalk
208 I.tif
Ground-Floor Commercial Ceiling
14' min. clear
208 J.tif
Upper-Floor Ceiling
9' min. clear
208 K.tif
Allowed Building Types (§ 208-24, Subsection 1)
▪ Commercial Block
▪ Liner Building
▪ Civic Building
□ Live-Work Unit
□ Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
□ Townhouse/Rowhouse
▪ Drive Thru
Allowed Frontage Type (§ 208-24, Subsection 2)
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Use Types (§ 208-22, Subsection 4)
Ground Floor
Service, Retail, or Recreation, Education and Public Assembly
208 R.tif
Upper Floor(s)
Service
208 S.tif
B.  
Parking and Encroachments
Parking (See § 208-26 for general requirements)
Parking Location (Distance from Property Line)
Front Setback
0' min. (1 bay permitted in front)
208 M.tif
Side Street Setback
5' min.
208 N.tif
Side Setback
0' min.
208 O.tif
Rear Setback
40' min. including buffer of trees
208 P.tif
District Specific Parking Req. (See § 208-26 for general standards)
Parking Drive Lane Width
24' max.(2-way), 15' max. (1-way)
208 O.tif
No parking spaces are required for Ancillary Buildings that are < 500 sf.
Parking must be provided on-site, off-site within 1,300', or as part of a district-wide parking management strategy.
Allowed Encroachments (See § 208-24, Subsection 3)
Balconies, Bay Windows, Awnings, etc.
Front
12' max.
208 T.tif
Side Street
12'max.
208 U.tif
Rear
12'max.
208 V.tif
Miscellaneous
Only one Main Building and one Ancillary Building may be built on each lot.
Where a building facade steps back or is absent from the BTL, the BTL should be maintained and defined by fence, landscape wall or hedge 30"-54" high.
All buildings must have a primary entrance along the front facade.
Loading docks, overhead doors and other service entries shall not be located on street-facing facades.
Loading docks, overhead doors, outdoor storage and other service areas shall be screened from view from 1-87 architecturally and/or with a thickly planted buffer of trees.

§ 208-23 Streets.

1. 
General.
All streets within the Town Center shall be constructed with the sidewalks, street trees, medians, amenities, on-street parking and other elements as illustrated for their corresponding street type on the Future Streets Map.
A.  
Dimensional flexibility is permitted for street types to account for varying ROW widths; however, they should be designed to have all the basic functional characteristics, including roadway width, on-street parking, sidewalks, multi-use paths, street trees and landscaped areas shown for their type.
2. 
Future Streets Map interpretation.
The existing and future roads indicated on the Future Streets Map are intended as a general guide to the desired future street connections within the Town Center. To provide for maximum design creativity and flexibility, the elements shown are intended as a suggested design outcome only and should not be interpreted literally or be strictly required. Actual configuration of any new public or private streets shall be subject to an agreement to dedicate roads consistent with a formal planning process.
3. 
New streets.
New future street connections shown are intended to illustrate vehicular and pedestrian connections which are desired by the Town to increase connectivity, provide more retail storefront and provide multiple travel options which will reduce traffic congestion on collector roads.
A.  
New streets shown are not required to be included in future development plans; however, they are recommended where they can be accommodated.
B.  
The placement of new streets does not have to conform with their exact locations shown on the map; however, they should provide the general linkage shown from one area or road to another, with alternative alignments or connections as may be approved by the Planning Board.
C.  
New future streets, where indicated on private land, may be held in private ownership or transferred to public ownership as agreed to by the developer and the Town.
4. 
Existing streets.
An existing street may not be substantially rebuilt, as determined by the Planning Board, without being brought into conformity with the standards of its associated street type shown on the Future Streets Map.
A.  
Where an existing street is not planned to be substantially redeveloped, the sidewalk and street trees shall be installed according to the standards of its associated street types.
5. 
Limits of required streetscape improvements.
Property owners are required to provide the associated streetscape improvements along the road frontage of all new building development, or building additions in excess of 3,000 square feet in size.
A.  
The linear extents of streetscape improvements should be along the entire width of the property frontage so as to provide a continuous pedestrian sidewalk link from one side of the property to another, except as noted below.
B.  
In cases where the width of the property frontage may be substantially larger than the width of the building frontage, the Planning Board may limit the extents of the required streetscape improvements to the immediate area of actual building frontage, as reasonably determined by the Planning Board in consideration of the relative development costs to the size of the overall project.
(1) 
In making this determination, the Planning Board may require the full scope of streetscape improvements to be provided only along the immediate building frontage, while only requiring that a basic sidewalk or multi-use path connection be made to the adjacent property lines to help complete long-term pedestrian connections.
C.  
As part of the required streetscape improvements, applicants may be required to provide funds into the Town Center Improvement District to fund associated crosswalks and other public roadway elements that would serve the property.
6. 
Street types.
A.  
Street types defined in this section include: Boulevard South, Boulevard North, Park Street, Neighborhood Street 1, Neighborhood Street 2, Local Street, and Perimeter Street. Individual descriptions and form requirements of each street type are detailed on the following pages.
B.  
Specific design considerations. Notwithstanding the illustrated layout of the street types in this section, the final approved design for all new or reconstructed streets shall consider location-specific design considerations, including but not limited to crosswalk locations, signalization needs, accommodation of delivery trucks, loading zones, bicycles, pedestrians and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as directed by the Planning Board.
7. 
Street Type Overview
A.  
Boulevard South
Existing Configuration:
208 FBC Streets A-Existing.png
Desired Configuration:
208 FBC Streets A-Desired.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
30 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
8.6 seconds, 7.2 seconds
Character Zones
TC6 - Boulevard District
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
80' - 90'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
30', 22'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
11'
208 C.tif
Multipurpose Path/Bike Lane
Within adjacent private frontages
Parking Lanes
8'
208 D.tif
Medians
10'
208 E.tif
Pedestrian Footway
3'
208 F.tif
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
Within adjacent private frontages
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 40' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
Within adjacent private frontages
Lighting
Within adjacent private frontages
Intersection
Curb Radius
15' min.
Distance Between Intersections
350' min. See Regulating Plan.
B.  
Boulevard North
208 FBC Streets B.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
30 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
5.4 seconds, 5.4 seconds
Character Zones
TC6 - Boulevard District
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
80' - 90'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
19'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
11'
208 C.tif
Bicycle Lanes
Within adjacent private frontages
Parking Lanes
8'
208 D.tif
Medians
10'
208 E.tif
Pedestrian Footway
3'
208 F.tif
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
5' continuous planter
208 G.tif
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 40' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
8' sidewalk
208 H.tif
Lighting
Within 5' continuous planter area
Intersection
Curb Radius
15'
Distance Between Intersections
350' min. See Regulating Plan.
C.  
Park Street
208 FBC Streets C.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
30 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
10.2 seconds
Character Zones
TC5 - Neighborhood District
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
60' - 70'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
36'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
10'
208 C.tif
Parking or Bicycle Lanes*
8'
208 D.tif
Medians
n/a
Pedestrian Footway
3' if required*
* These areas may alternately be composed of 8' wide on-street parking or 8' wide buffered bike lanes. If used as on-street parking, would require 3' Pedestrian Footway along curb.
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
6'-8'
208 E.tif
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 40' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
6-8' sidewalk
208 F.tif
Lighting
Within adjacent private frontages
Intersection
Curb Radius
15' min.
Distance Between Intersections
200' min. See Regulating Plan.
D.  
Neighborhood Street 1
208 FBC Streets D.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
20 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
9.7 seconds
Character Zones
TC5 - Neighborhood District
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
72' - 82'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
36'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
10'
208 C.tif
Bicycle Lanes
6' cycle track
208 D.tif
Parking Lanes
8'
208 E.tif
Medians
n/a
Pedestrian Footway
n/a
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
4'x4' tree well
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 30' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
12' - 17' sidewalk
208 F.tif
Lighting
Aligned with 4'x4' tree wells
Intersection
Curb Radius
10'
Distance Between Intersections
100' min. See Regulating Plan.
E.  
Neighborhood Street 2
208 FBC Streets E.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
20 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
10.2 seconds
Character Zones
TC5 - Neighborhood District
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
60' - 70'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
36'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
10'
208 C.tif
Bicycle Lanes
Sharrows
Parking Lanes
8'
208 D.tif
Medians
n/a
Pedestrian Footway
n/a
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
4x4 tree well
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 30' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
12' - 17' sidewalk
208 E.tif
Lighting
Within adjacent private frontages
Intersection
Curb Radius
10' min.
Distance Between Intersections
100' min. See Regulating Plan.
F.  
Local Street
208 FBC Streets F.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
20 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
8 seconds
Character Zones
TC5 - Neighborhood District
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
50' - 60'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
28'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
10'
208 C.tif
Bicycle Lanes
Sharrows
Parking Lanes
8'
208 D.tif
Medians
n/a
Pedestrian Footway
n/a
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
4x4 tree well
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 30' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
11' - 16' sidewalk
208 E.tif
Lighting
Aligned with 4'x4' tree wells
Intersection
Curb Radius
10'
Distance Between Intersections
100' min. See Regulating Plan.
G.  
Perimeter Street
208 FBC Streets G.png
Application
Movement Type
Slow
Design Speed
30 mph
Pedestrian Crossing Time
8 seconds
Character Zones
TC1-TC4
Overall Widths
Right-of-Way (ROW) Width
60'
208 A.tif
Curb Face to Curb Face Width
22'
208 B.tif
Lanes
Traffic Lanes
11'
208 C.tif
Bicycle Lanes
Sharrows
Parking Lanes
n/a
Medians
n/a
Edges
Curb Type
6" Raised
Planter Type
9' swale
208 D.tif
Landscape Type
Medium Trees, evenly spaced @ 40' o.c. avg.
Walkway Type
5' sidewalk / 8' multi-use path
208 E.tif
Edges
Varies 2'-5'
208 F.tif
Lighting
Within planter areas
Intersection
Curb Radius
15' min.
Distance Between Intersections
200' min. See Regulating Plan.

§ 208-24 Form standards.

1. 
Building types.
A.  
Buildings in new construction shall generally conform with the basic building types set forth in this section and illustrated on the following pages.
(1) 
The building types defined in this section should be used as a general guide to the desired form and function of new buildings within the Clifton Park Town Center. The illustrations and photographs provided are for illustrative purposes only and should not be interpreted literally, especially with regard to architectural styles.
B.  
Building types set forth in this section include: Commercial Block, Liner Building, Civic Building, Townhouse/Rowhouse, Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex, Live-Work Units, and Ancillary Buildings.
2. 
Frontage types.
A.  
Building frontages in new construction shall generally conform with the basic frontage types set forth in this section and illustrated on the following pages.
(1) 
The frontage types defined in this section should be used as a general guide to the desired public spaces within the Clifton Park Town Center. The illustrations and photographs provided are for illustrative purposes only and should not be interpreted literally, especially with regard to architectural styles.
B.  
Frontage types set forth in this section include: Shopfront, Gallery, Forecourt, Stoop, and Porch.
3. 
Appurtenances.
Building appurtenances, such as porches, awnings or balconies, may encroach into setback areas follows, except as may be limited by district-specific maximums for front-, side- or rear-facing facades:
A.  
Awnings. Awnings may extend into a required setback. Awnings may extend into a public right-of-way, provided they extend no closer than three feet from the edge of the street or road.
(1) 
All awnings shall provide a minimum clearance underneath of at least eight feet and shall be a minimum depth of four feet.
B.  
Balconies. Balconies may extend into a required setback, provided they extend no closer than four feet from a lot line. Balconies may extend into a public right-of-way, provided they extend no closer than three feet from the edge of the street or road.
(1) 
All balconies shall provide a minimum clearance above the sidewalk of at least 10 feet and shall be a minimum depth of four feet.
C.  
Galleries. Galleries may extend into a required setback. Galleries may extend into a public right-of-way, provided they extend no closer than three feet from the edge of the street or road.
(1) 
Galleries should extend contiguously along at least 50% of the building facade frontage.
(2) 
All galleries shall provide a minimum clearance above the sidewalk of at least 10 feet and shall be a minimum depth of eight feet.
D.  
Porches. Porches on a front facade shall be a minimum of six feet in depth clear from the face of the facade to the railing and shall extend no less than 50% of the width of the facade.
(1) 
Porches may extend up to nine feet into a required setback.
(2) 
Porches shall not extend any closer than three feet from any lot line or public right-of-way.
E.  
Stoops. Stoops may extend into a required setback, provided they extend no closer than four feet from a lot line. Stoops may not extend into a public right-of-way.
(1) 
Stoops shall be no more than six feet deep, not including steps.
(2) 
Stoops may include an overhead awning above but shall not be enclosed on the sides.
F.  
Building eaves, cornices, roof overhangs and light shelves may encroach up to two feet into setback areas, provided they are no closer than five feet from any property line.
G.  
Bay windows, chimneys and entry vestibules or columns may encroach up to three feet into setback areas, provided the area is no wider than eight feet and no closer than five feet from any property line.
H.  
Outdoor dining and patio areas may encroach into setback areas, provided they are at grade or within two feet of grade level.
4. 
Building Types Overview
A.  
Commercial Block
Description
The Commercial Block building type is a small to large-sized structure, typically attached, that provides a vertical mix of uses with ground-floor commercial, service, or retail uses and upper-floor commercial, service, or residential uses. Smaller versions of this type make up the primary component of a neighborhood main street, while larger versions make up the primary component of downtown, therefore being a key component to providing walkability.
208 FBC 244-4A desc 1.tif 208 FBC 244-4A desc 2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
□ Porches
▪ Balconies
□ Stoops
▪ Galleries
▪ Courtyards
B.  
Liner Building
Description
The Liner Building provides a relatively shallow depth of retail and office storefronts around the perimeter of a block while screening a central interior courtyard for use as a public space, parking lot, parking garage or "large-box" retail structure. The purpose of the Liner Building is to provide a smaller-scale pedestrian atmosphere along the sidewalk while screening less visually attractive or utilitarian uses behind it.
208 FBC 244-4B desc1.tif 208 FBC 244-4B desc2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
▪ Shopfront
□ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
▪ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
□ Porches
▪ Balconies
□ Stoops
▪ Galleries
▪ Courtyards
General Note:
The drawings and photos on this page are illustrative, not regulatory.
C.  
Civic Building
Description
Civic Buildings are typically placed in focal locations. They should be designed with their function as landmarks in mind:
▪ The scale of Civic Buildings should typically be larger than surrounding buildings in order to be more prominent and visible across greater distances.
▪ Floor-to-floor heights and architectural details should be proportionately larger than those of private buildings that exist or are anticipated to exist within adjacent parcels.
▪ Prominent roof forms and additive elements such as cupolas can visually extend the height of the building.
208 FBC 244-4C desc1.tif 208 FBC 244-4C desc2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
□ Shopfront
□ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
▪ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
□ Porches
□ Balconies
□ Stoops
□ Galleries
▪ Courtyards
General Note:
The drawings and photos on this page are illustrative, not regulatory.
D.  
Townhouse/Rowhouse
Description
The Townhouse, alternately known as the Rowhouse, is a single-family type that is attached to its neighbors on either side.
208 FBC 244-4D desc1.tif 208 FBC 244-4D desc2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
□ Shopfront
□ Gallery
□ Forecourt
▪ Stoop
▪ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
▪ Porches
▪ Balconies
▪ Stoops
□ Galleries
▪ Courtyards
General Note:
The drawings and photos on this page are illustrative, not regulatory.
E.  
Duplex/Triplex/Fourplex
Description
This is a small multifamily residential type. Units may have individual entrances from the sidewalk or may be accessed through a common building entry.
208 FBC 244-4E desc1.tif 208 FBC 244-4E desc2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
▪ Stoop
▪ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
▪ Porches
▪ Balconies
▪ Stoops
▪ Galleries
▪ Courtyards
General Note:
The drawings and photos on this page are illustrative, not regulatory.
F.  
Live-Work Unit
Description
The Live-Work Unit is an attached or detached single-family type that includes a commercial component, usually in the form of a ground-floor shopfront space. The Live-Work Unit provides an opportunity to integrate commercial uses in very small increments.
208 FBC 244-4F desc1.tif 208 FBC 244-4F desc2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
▪ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
□ Porches
▪ Balconies
□ Stoops
▪ Galleries
▪ Courtyards
General Note:
The drawings and photos on this page are illustrative, not regulatory.
G.  
Drive Thru
Description
Drive-Thru buildings such as banks or gas stations within the Town Center are to be configured with the building portion of the program located toward the street and the vehicular circulation for the drive thru or gasoline pumps to the rear, screened from view. In this way, Drive Thrus can be accommodated while maintaining well-shaped and activated street frontages. Where possible, curb cuts should be limited to one vehicular entrance/exit so as to minimize interference with pedestrian sidewalks.
208 FBC 244-4G desc1.tif 208 FBC 244-4G desc2.tif
Allowed Frontage Types
▪ Shopfront
▪ Gallery
□ Forecourt
□ Stoop
□ Porch
Allowed Appurtenances
▪ Awnings
□ Porches
□ Balconies
□ Stoops
□ Galleries
□ Courtyards
General Note:
The drawings and photos on this page are illustrative, not regulatory.
5. 
Frontage Types:
A.  
Shopfront
A. Description
The main facade of the building is at or near the frontage line and shall include a canopy or awning element that overlaps the sidewalk along the majority of the frontage. The canopy is a structural cantilevered shed roof, and the awning is canvas or similar material and is often retractable.
B. Size
Distance between Glazing
2' max.
208 A.tif
Ground-Floor Transparency
50% min.
Door Recess
5' max.
208 B.tif
C. Canopy or Awning
Depth
4' min.
208 C.tif
Width, Cumulative
70% of faade width min.
Setback from Curb
2' min.
208 D.tif
Height, Clear
8' min.
208 E.tif
D. Miscellaneous
Doors may be recessed as long as main facade is at BTL.
Open-ended awnings are encouraged.
Rounded and hooped awnings are discouraged
B.  
Gallery
A. Description
The main facade of the building is at the build-to line and the Gallery element overlaps the sidewalk, eliminating the need for an awning. This frontage type is intended for buildings with ground-floor commercial or retail uses and may be one or two stories in height.
B. Size
Depth, Clear
8' min.
208 A.tif
Ground Floor Height, Clear
11' min.
208 B.tif
Upper Floor Height, Clear
9' min.
208 C.tif
Height
2 stories max
208 D.tif
Setback from Curb
2' min.; 3' max.
208 E.tif
C. Miscellaneous
Galleries must also follow all the rules of the Shopfront frontage type.
C.  
Forecourt
A. Description
The primary portion of the building's main facade is at the build-to line while a small percentage is set back, creating a court space. This space can be used as an apartment entry court, garden space, or for restaurant outdoor dining.
B. Size
Width, Clear
12' min.
208 A.tif
Depth, Clear
12' min.
208 B.tif
C. Miscellaneous
Forecourts are especially useful along larger, more auto-dominant thoroughfares in order to provide well-shaped, intimately sized public outdoor spaces.
D.  
Stoop
A. Description
The main facade of the building is at the build-to line, and the elevated stoop projects forward. The stoop is used to access a first floor that is elevated above the sidewalk to ensure privacy within the building. Stairs from the stoop may descend forward or to the side.
B. Size
Width, Clear
5' min., 8' max.
208 A.tif
Depth, Clear
5' min., 8' max.
208 B.tif
Height, Clear
8' min.
208 C.tif
Height
1 story max.
Finish Level Above Sidewalk
18" min.
208 D.tif
C. Miscellaneous
Stairs may be perpendicular or parallel to the building facade.
E.  
Porch
A. Description
The main facade of the building is at or near the frontage line and shall include a canopy or awning element that overlaps the sidewalk along the majority of the frontage. The canopy is a structural cantilevered shed roof, and the awning is canvas or similar material and is often retractable.
B. Size
Width, Clear
10' min.
208 A.tif
Depth, Clear
8' min.
208 B.tif
Height, Clear
8' min.
208 C.tif
Height
3 stories max.
Finish Level Above Sidewalk
18" min.
208 D.tif

§ 208-25 Architectural standards.

1. 
Guidelines vs. standards.
Portions of this code which are intended as nonmandatory recommendations (guidelines) are defined using the word "should." Provisions which are considered mandatory requirements (standards) are defined using the word "shall."
2. 
General principles.
It is the intent of these standards and guidelines to provide substantive design direction while allowing for reasonable flexibility in the cases of renovations or redevelopment of existing properties.
A.  
Design with the pedestrian in mind. Create attractive and safe routes for people to walk and relax which link to other areas. Limit the visibility of parking areas.
B.  
Create a local identity. The architecture of the Town Center should be custom designed. Avoid or minimize corporate chain architectural styles.
C.  
Keep the "park" in Clifton Park. Emphasize green lawns, shade trees and robust landscaping.
3. 
Facades.
New or substantially renovated building facades shall comply with the following:
A.  
Ground-floor areas. The ground-floor areas of a facade, especially in pedestrian areas, should exhibit the highest levels of articulation, with larger openings and changes in depth, especially around entry points.
B.  
Blank wall areas. Blank wall areas, except as noted below for required shopfront facades, shall not exceed the size of a rectangle measuring 30 feet in width and eight feet in height. (Blank wall area limitations do not apply to facades facing an alley, service drive or nonpublic street.)
C.  
Required shopfront facades. Ground-floor shopfront store windows, where required by the Regulating Plan, shall provide a minimum of 50% facade transparency [i.e., square footage of glazed window and door openings (including trim) over square footage of entire facade area on that floor] at the ground-floor facade area, allowing a view at least eight feet into the interior space within.
(1) 
Blank wall areas in required shopfront facade areas shall not exceed the size of a rectangle measuring 10 feet wide by five feet high.
(2) 
Upper-floor areas of the facade above required shopfronts shall be designed to provide a minimum of 20% facade transparency.
(3) 
Blank wall areas in floors above required shopfronts shall not exceed the size of a rectangle measuring 15 feet wide by eight feet high.
D.  
Entry/exit doors. Public entry and exit doors which swing outward shall be recessed into the facade a minimum of three feet where the sidewalk abuts the building.
E.  
Window and door openings. Window and door openings in masonry facades should express a structural lintel above to express how it is carrying the weight. A similar method using wood trim can be used on wood-clad facades.
F.  
Columns/posts. The proportion of structural elements such as columns or posts should be appropriate to the weight they appear to be carrying.
4. 
Roofs.
A.  
Flat roofs. Flat-roof structures shall be capped by an articulated parapet design which provides a noticeable "cap" to the building.
(1) 
The parapet on a single-story facade should express at least six inches in overhang depth and be at least 18 inches tall. Parapet overhang depth and height for taller facades should be increasingly larger.
B.  
Sloped roofs. Sloped roof structures are encouraged to maintain a pitch between 6:12 minimum and 12:12 maximum for all primary roof areas (not including dormers, entry canopies or similar accessory elements).
(1) 
Roof overhangs are encouraged to be at least six inches deep.
(2) 
Dormers and gables are encouraged along front facades to help maintain a prominent facade, reduce the scale of long runs of roof and divert rainwater and snow from entry areas.
5. 
Building massing.
A.  
Shapes help break up the scale. The overall massing of buildings should have areas of noticeable 3-D relief or be broken down into smaller shapes to reduce the scale and avoid the appearance of a "large box."
(1) 
Avoid trying to break up the scale and massing of a large facade by making it look like many different building facades stuck together. This often results in a fake "Disneyland" appearance.
B.  
Larger building massing. Very large or long buildings should attempt to break up their massing along public frontages by providing articulations along the facade generally as follows:
(1) 
"Courtyard breaks" (courtyard areas) should be provided no less than every 300 feet of facade length. These should create a change in facade depth at least 20 feet deep by 40 feet wide and a change in facade height of at least eight feet. The courtyard space provided shall be designed to be accessible to pedestrians with attractive amenities such as seating, landscaping, storefront displays and/or entranceways.
(2) 
"Major articulations" should be provided no less than every 150 feet of facade length. These should create a change in facade depth at least four feet deep by eight feet wide and a change in facade height of at least four feet.
(3) 
"Medium articulations" should be provided no less than every 75 feet of facade length. These should create a change in facade depth at least two feet deep by four feet wide.
(4) 
"Minor articulations" should be provided approximately every 20 to 30 feet along a facade. These should create a change in facade depth at least eight inches deep by 12 inches wide.
(5) 
Note that the recommended articulation placements listed above are not additive you would not need a major, medium and minor articulation all at the same location. The largest articulation required would override all lesser ones.
6. 
Exterior materials and details.
A.  
Primary facade materials. As listed in Table 6.1, are recommended for not less than 70% of the exterior wall surface on all facades facing a public street.
(1) 
Smaller-scale, natural materials should be used whenever possible, especially on front facades and near pedestrian areas.
(2) 
Exterior colors should typically be a natural, muted shade. Brighter, more-vibrant colors such as red or yellow should be reserved for minor accents and highlights only.
B.  
Secondary facade materials. As listed in Table 6.1, should be used as accent materials on not more than 30% of the exterior wall surface on all facades facing a public street.
C.  
Other materials. Other materials listed in Table 6.1 as "Not Recommended" should avoid being used or should be used only in service areas which are not intended to be accessed by pedestrians or readily visible from a public way.
D.  
Material changes. Changes from one material or color to another along the horizontal direction should occur at "inside corner" transitions. Changes in materials or color along the vertical direction should occur at a hard-edge "bump-out" transition which gives the material a surface to terminate into. Facades with an overabundance of different materials or colors are generally discouraged.
(1) 
When using more than one primary facade material, one should be used as the dominant theme, with the others used more sparingly to accentuate the design.
TABLE 6.1 - EXTERIOR MATERIALS
Recommended Materials
Discouraged Materials (Not Recommended)
Primary Facade Materials
Brick - common red, brown, beige
T1-11 Siding
Wood - clapboard, shingle, wood trim, painted
Plain (untextured) C.M.U.
Stone - natural or artificial
Unfinished or Unpainted Wood
Cement Fiber Siding - colored or painted
Glass Curtain Wall
Secondary Facade Materials
E.I.F.S or Stucco (4 feet above grade minimum)
Textured or Split-Faced C.M.U. - colored
Vertical Board and Batten - painted
Glass Block
Precast Concrete Panels - colored
Metal or Composite Panels
Doors and Windows
Wood, Aluminum, Vinyl-Clad Windows and Doors
Mirrored Glass
Colored/Bronzed Glass
Tinted Glass (darker than 70% V.L.T.)
Roofing
Architectural Shingles
Standing Seam Metal
Slate or Tile - natural or synthetic
Copper
**insert flat roof material choices
Wood, PVC or Vinyl Parapet or Trim
Copper or Colored Metal Roof Flashing
Galvanized or Bare Metal Flashing
Awnings
Canvas, Acrylic or Vinyl Awnings - one-, two- or three-color
Plastic or Gloss Finish Awnings
Translucent, Backlit or Illuminated Awnings
Landscape Walls and Fencing
Brick or Brick Veneer Walls
Bare Concrete Walls
Stone or Stone Veneer Walls
C.M.U. Walls
Metal, Extruded Aluminum Fences - colored metal
Bare or Coated Chain-Link Fence
Cast-Iron or Wrought-Iron Fences
Wood Fences - painted
Note: All material and paint colors should be of a natural, muted shade, except as used for specific design accents or highlights. Alternate materials to those listed above may be approved by the Town, provided they are considered to be equivalent or better quality and appearance. V.L.T. is "visible light transmission."
7. 
Equipment.
A.  
Mechanical equipment. Mechanical equipment, including roof-mounted, facade-mounted or ground-level-mounted, shall be screened from view from adjacent public rights-of-way, properties and pedestrian walkways (does not include service alleys).
(1) 
Screening shall be achieved with nondeciduous landscape plantings, architectural building elements which match the exterior building materials, or parapet walls.

§ 208-26 Site standards.

1. 
Parking.
A.  
Applicability. The parking requirements of this section apply to all commercial and residential properties applying for a permit for construction, renovation, addition, site plan alteration or change of use. This section does not apply to on-street parking provided in the public right-of-way.
B.  
Changes in use and additions. The minimum parking requirements for a property shall be reviewed for compliance with this code which result in increased customer space or which create a more-intensive parking use.
C.  
Minimum parking requirements. The minimum on-site parking requirements for each use shall be as listed in Table 7.1, unless parking reductions through the use of staggered-hours or shared parking arrangements are approved as detailed below. Fractional results shall be rounded up. Values shown are for net usable square feet (not including mechanical, storage, etc.), unless otherwise noted.
TABLE 7.1 - Minimum Parking Requirements
Use Type
Required Spaces
Commercial
Animal, pet grooming
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Animal, veterinary services
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Assembly or auditorium, indoor
1 per every 4 seats
Automotive, fuel sales
1 per fuel pump + emp.
Automotive, service or wash
2 per service bay + emp.
Automotive, sales
n/a
Bank
4 per 1,000 s.f.
Bank, drive-thru
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Bar or tavern
10 per 1,000 s.f.
Club, indoor
2 per 1,000 s.f.
Commercial amusement, indoor
1 per each table/lane + emp.
Dry cleaning
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Home occupation
As determined
Hotel
1 per room + emp.
Laundromat
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Medical service, outpatient
4 per 1,000 s.f.
Office
4 per 1,000 s.f.
Personal care
3.5 per 1,000 s.f.
Repair and maintenance, light
2.5 per 1,000 s.f.
Restaurant1
8 per 1,000 s.f.
Restaurant, drive-thru1
6 per 1,000 s.f.
Retail
3.5 per 1,000 s.f.
Retail, drive-thru
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Retail, outdoor display
3.5 per 1,000 s.f.
Residential
Nursing home
1 per every 3 beds
Residence, multifamily (1-2 bedroom)
1.5 per dwelling unit
Residence, multifamily (3+ bedroom)
2 per dwelling unit
Senior housing
1.1 per dwelling unit
Civic/Public
Cultural center
2.5 per 1,000 s.f.
Municipal office or public safety
3 per 1,000 s.f.
Religious facility
1 per every 4 seats
School, child day care
1 per 10 students
School, nursery or K-12
1 per 10 students
Utility, telecommunication tower
n/a
Utility, general public service
n/a
Notes: "+ emp." indicates to also include one parking space for each employee on duly during a typical shift.
1Restaurants with outdoor seating shall only calculate 50% of the outdoor seating area toward the parking requirements.
D.  
Insufficient parking. Where there is insufficient parking available on site for a proposed use, change in use or expansion, the following options may be considered by the Town as meeting the parking requirements:
(1) 
Reduction in the minimum amount of required parking through an approved staggered-hours or shared parking arrangement, as described below.
(2) 
Reduction in the size of the proposed expansion.
(3) 
Reduction in the intensity of the proposed use change, including but not limited to a denial of the change of use.
E.  
Maximum parking. The Town is authorized to limit or reconfigure the number of parking spaces provided on site if they are in excess of 200% of the minimum amount required. The following options may be considered by the Town for excesses of 10 or more spaces:
(1) 
Preexisting asphalt paved areas no longer needed by a new proposed use shall be removed and reclaimed as landscaped areas, islands, rain gardens or other pervious treatment.
(2) 
That excess parking be held in future reserve.
(3) 
That excess parking be configured as public parking which is specifically located and designated with signage as available for public use, with sidewalk connections to adjacent areas.
(4) 
That excess parking areas and associated travel lanes be constructed of pervious paving surfaces in lieu of traditional asphalt.
F.  
General provisions.
(1) 
All properties are required to provide cross-access connections to adjacent parking lots and are encouraged to provide unreserved or shared parking arrangements with neighboring properties.
(2) 
All off-street parking areas should be consolidated within the center of street blocks where possible, behind buildings.
(3) 
A clear, designated pedestrian way(s) shall be provided from parking areas to the building entrances. Building entrances from parking areas, including rear (opposite front/side facades) entries, shall provide attractive, welcoming, architectural entry treatment.
(4) 
One required off-street parking space may be substituted by each on-street parking space existing directly in front of the business within the public right-of-way or public street. Each on-street space may only count toward one property.
(5) 
Required off-street parking, including employee parking, may be provided on a different lot than the subject property, provided it is counted as part of an approved shared parking agreement.
(6) 
Seasonal outdoor dining or bar areas shall be calculated at the reduced rate of 50% of the normal parking requirements.
G.  
Staggered-hours parking. A reduction in the minimum number of required parking spaces may be approved for combinations of uses which have a staggered demand schedules over time, such as daytime office with residential.
(1) 
Staggered-hours parking may be utilized by single properties with multiple uses, and by multiple adjacent property owners who physically merge or connect their parking lots into a common shared lot, as approved by the Town Engineer.
(2) 
An example guide for calculating staggered demands between multiple uses is provided in the appendix for reference.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See § 208-29, Appendix.
H.  
Shared parking agreements. A reduction in the minimum number of required parking spaces may be approved for two or more adjacent property owners or businesses who share or physically connect their lots and agree to a shared parking arrangement.
(1) 
The total number of parking spaces which may be deducted from the shared lot shall be as shown in Table 7.2, Allowable Shared Parking Reduction.
(2) 
The majority of the parking provided in the shared lot must remain unreserved.
(3) 
Shared parking reductions may be combined with staggered-hours parking reductions.
TABLE 7.2 - Allowable Shared Parking Reduction
Total Number of Shared Parking Spaces
Number of Businesses Sharing
2
3
4
5
6
7+
<20
0
0
0
0
0
0
20-29
1
2
3
4
4
4
30-39
2
3
4
5
6
6
40-49
3
4
5
6
7
8
50-59
4
5
6
7
8
9
60-69
5
6
7
8
9
10
70 or more
6
7
8
9
10
11
Notes: Numbers shown are the total spaces which may be deducted below the minimum parking requirements for all combined businesses using the shared lot. Shared parking configurations of 70 or more spaces may be prorated with one additional space for each 10 additional spaces shared but may not be additionally prorated by the number of businesses beyond seven.
2. 
Transit.
Provision for transit facilities, including bus/bus rapid transit stops/pull-offs shall be coordinated with regional and local transit agencies, and such facilities shall be incorporated into site plans as directed by the Planning Board.
3. 
Parking lot landscaping.
New or reconfigured parking lot areas shall provide the following landscaped elements:
A.  
Front yard buffer (A). All parking areas abutting a public right-of-way or future street shall provide a front yard buffer at least 10 feet deep from the sidewalk, consisting of shrubbery, hedges, trees, decorative walls or fences, which creates a visual screen at least three feet high; does not apply to internal driveways, alleys or access roads not designated on the Future Street Plan. (Figure 7.4)
B.  
Front yard perimeter bulb-out (B). All parking areas abutting a public right-of-way or future street shall provide bulb-outs so that there are not more than 15 continuous parking spaces in a row uninterrupted along that frontage. The bulb-out should be equal in depth to the parking spaces, a minimum of nine feet wide, which includes flowers, shrubs, grass and/or trees where not more than 50% of the ground cover is mulch or gravel. (Figure 7.4)
C.  
End-of-row bulb-out (C). A landscaped bulb-out should be located at the end of any perimeter parking row abutting a traveled lane. The bulb-out should be equal in depth to the parking space, a minimum of nine feet wide, which includes flowers, shrubs, grass and/or trees where not more than 50% of the ground cover is mulch or gravel. (Figure 7.4)
D.  
Internal landscaped island (D). Internal parking rows should provide landscaped islands at either end of the rows. The islands shall be equal in length to the rows and at least nine feet wide, or of equivalent size if an irregular shape is necessary. Islands shall include at least two trees with shrubs, flowers, grass or other plantings so that not more than 50% of the ground cover is mulch or gravel. (Figure 7.4)
E.  
Intermediate landscaped island (E). Internal parking rows should provide intermediate landscaped islands so that there are not more than 12 continuous parking spaces in a row uninterrupted. Islands shall be landscaped the same as internal landscaped islands. (Figure 7.4)
F.  
Enhanced parking median (F). Larger parking lots which contain multiple rows of parking should provide an enhanced parking median so that there are not more than six rows of parking uninterrupted. Enhanced landscaped medians may be of two different types landscaped or pedestrian. (Figures 7.5 and 7.6)
(1) 
Landscaped medians shall separate the rows of parking on either side with a continuous six-foot-wide landscaped band which includes additional landscaping and trees no less than every 30 feet.
(2) 
Pedestrian medians shall separate the rows of parking on either side with a continuous six-foot-wide pedestrian sidewalk - flush to grade - which leads toward building entry areas and connects to perimeter sidewalks with crosswalks.
4. 
Service areas and loading docks.
A.  
Trash and recycling dumpsters or similar collection areas shall be located in the rear or to the side of buildings and screened from view from adjacent public rights-of-way, properties and pedestrian walkways (not including service alleys).
(1) 
Screening shall be achieved with building enclosures on three sides which match or complement the exterior building materials.
5. 
Landscaping.
A.  
Applicability and approvals. The following minimum landscaping requirements apply to all new or redeveloped commercial and residential projects within the Town Center which require site plan review and approval, as follows:
(1) 
Applications for building improvements or renovations which do not increase the gross floor area of the property shall not be required to meet the landscaping requirements of this section.
(2) 
Applications for a change of use shall not be required to meet the landscaping requirements, except where additional screening or buffers may be required.
(3) 
Applications for site improvements such as parking lot or driveway reconfigurations shall only be required to meet the landscaping requirements for the areas affected.
(4) 
Applications for building expansions which increase the gross floor area by less than 50% or 5,000 square feet shall only be required to meet the landscaping requirements for the portions of the site affected, as determined by the Planning Director.
(5) 
Applications for building expansions which increase the gross floor area by more than 50% or 5,000 square feet shall be required to meet the landscaping requirements.
B.  
See Subsection 3 for specific landscaping requirements pertaining to parking lots.
C.  
General requirements.
(1) 
These requirements pertain to the minimum area of greenspace and the types of landscaping required for the site. All greenspace areas shall be covered by the following:
(a) 
Native vegetation; or
(b) 
Trees, shrubbery, or nursery plants with appropriate mulch; or
(c) 
Any combination of the above;
(d) 
Sod, lawn, or other variety of ground cover in combination with any of the above.
(2) 
All landscaping shall be installed in accordance with the landscaping plan as approved by the Planning Board prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy and shall be installed in accordance with accepted landscape practices within the region. In instances where conditions do not permit immediate planting, the applicant may be required to post a performance bond or, in lieu thereof, sufficient moneys to ensure later compliance.
(3) 
All landscaping shown on an approved site plan or landscaping plan shall be maintained in a vigorous growing condition throughout the duration of the use, and plants not so maintained shall be replaced with new plants at the beginning of the next growing season.
(4) 
Landscaping and buffer requirements in this section may be met by utilizing existing vegetation where possible, with approval from the Planning Board.
(5) 
The use of invasive plant species, as defined by the most-recent DEC Advisory Invasive Plant List, is not permitted.
(6) 
Species diversity is encouraged in order to prevent extensive vegetation loss should certain species become vulnerable to diseases. In cases where there are more than eight required new trees to be planted, no more than 40% of them can be of one species. Where more than 24 new trees are required to be planted, no more than 24% of them can be of one species.
D.  
Front yard landscaping requirements. Front yard landscaping should be provided and arranged as illustrated in the Building Placement and Front Yard Design requirements for each TC Zone and in the corresponding Street Type.[2]
(1) 
Required landscaped terrace areas shall provide a mix of lawn areas in combination with deciduous trees, shrubs or perennial/annual beds.
(2) 
Required tree lawns shall be provided with sod or lawn, except for mulch areas directly around each tree.
(3) 
Street trees within required tree lawns or planters shall be shade trees (not ornamental) with a minimum caliper of three inches and a minimum height of eight feet.
(4) 
Required tree planters shall be covered with cast-iron tree grates flush with adjacent sidewalk surfaces meeting ADA requirements for minimum opening sizes.
[2]
Editor's Note: See § 208-22 and § 208-23.
6. 
Outdoor lighting.
A.  
Applicability. The lighting requirements of this section apply to all commercial and residential properties applying for a permit for construction, renovation, addition or site plan alteration. This section does not apply to public streetlighting installed by the Town of Clifton Park in the public right-of-way.
(1) 
Preexisting site lighting fixtures which are removed or replaced shall be brought into conformity with this section.
(2) 
Preexisting buildings which undergo a renovation exceeding 50% of the value of the structure, or addition increasing the floor area by more than 50%, shall bring the existing site lighting of their property into conformity with this section.
B.  
Parking lot lighting.
(1) 
All fixtures shall be full-cutoff, downward-facing.
(2) 
Light fixtures located within the interior asphalt area of a parking lot shall not exceed 30 feet in height. Light fixtures located along the perimeter edge of a parking area within 50 feet of a property line shall not exceed 15 feet.
(3) 
Average 0.2 footcandle at grade level, maximum 2.0 footcandles.
C.  
Pedestrian walkway lighting.
(1) 
Light fixtures located along pedestrian walkways adjacent to parking lots shall not exceed 15 feet in height.
(2) 
Light fixtures located along internal pedestrian walkways or paths not adjacent to a parking area shall not exceed 10 feet in height.
(3) 
Average 0.2 footcandle at grade level maximum 2.0 footcandles.
D.  
Vehicular canopy lighting.
(1) 
Light fixtures under vehicular canopies shall be:
(a) 
Fully recessed or flush with the underside surface to conceal the illumination source; or
(b) 
Provided via uplighting to reflect off of the underside surface of the canopy with a shielded fixture that directly lights onto the canopy bottom only.
(2) 
Average 3.0 footcandles at grade level, maximum seven footcandles.
E.  
Building and security lighting.
(1) 
All exterior building or security lighting must be full-cutoff, shielded and/or angled downward to focus the light only on the intended doorway or walkway as necessary.
(2) 
Security lighting is encouraged to be provided with regular pedestrian light fixtures where visible from the street or public way to match others used on site.
(3) 
Building-mounted architectural "accent lights" are permitted as downward-facing only.
(4) 
Average 2.0 footcandles, maximum four footcandles.
F.  
Light quality and color. LED (light-emitting diode) fixtures are recommended for energy savings and longevity, provided the light is within the temperature range between 2,500 and 3,800 Kelvin.
G.  
Prohibited light types;
(1) 
Cobra-head-style fixtures with dropped lenses.
(2) 
Mercury-vapor, low-pressure sodium lamps.
(3) 
Building- or ground-mounted architectural accent uplights, or fixtures which provide no "top cap" to prevent light spill upward into the night sky.
(4) 
Laser lights, searchlights or similar high-intensity beam fixtures.
7. 
Pedestrian amenities.
A.  
All new development or redevelopment projects shall provide common pedestrian amenities, such as benches and bicycle racks, commensurate in quantity to the size of the project, as directed by the Planning Department.

§ 208-27 Signs.

1. 
All signs within the Town Center shall be governed by Chapter 171 of the Town of Clifton Park Code.

§ 208-28 Definitions.

As used in this article, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated:
ANIMAL, PET GROOMING
An establishment engaged in providing services for common household pets, including bathing, clipping, grooming, feeding and day care; may include retail sales; does not include overnight pet boarding.
ANIMAL, VETERINARY SERVICES
An establishment for the medical care of dogs, cats and other domestic small-animal pets by practitioners of the sciences of veterinary medicine; may include on-site boarding services; does not include outdoor pens, exercise runs or overnight boarding.
APPURTENANCES
Porches, balconies, patios, seating areas, canopies, awnings, etc., which extend outward from the facade of a building and which do not typically count as an extension of the facade itself for the purposes of measuring setbacks.
ASSEMBLY OR AUDITORIUM, INDOOR
Commercial or nonprofit movie theaters, stage theaters, music performances social halls, meeting rooms, convention or catering halls and similar places; does not include religious facilities or outdoor performance space; separate and distinct from "club, live performance."
AUTOMOTIVE, FUEL SALES
A building or land area intended to be used for the retail sale of automotive fuels; separate and distinct from "automotive, service or wash."
AUTOMOTIVE, SALES
An establishment for the retail sale or leasing of new or used motorized vehicles, including cars, trucks, boats, motorcycles, snowmobiles, campers, RVs, tractors, lawn tractors, construction equipment and similar vehicles.
AUTOMOTIVE, SERVICE OR WASH
General automotive vehicle services, including oil, brake, muffler or tire replacement, engine or body work, inspections, automated and self-service car washing, detailing or similar services; does not include automotive salvage or junkyard operations.
AWNING
A wall-mounted, cantilevered structure providing shade and cover from the elements for pedestrians; similar to "canopy."
BALCONY
A projection of an upper-level floor slab which extends out from a facade, designed for people to stand on, with railings and an access door into the interior.
BANK
A financial institution licensed for receiving, lending, or safeguarding money, including public commercial, retail banks and credit unions.
BANK, WITH DRIVE THRU
A bank which includes a drive-up teller, ATM machine or freestanding ATM kiosks.
BAR or TAVERN
A business primarily engaged in the retail sale of alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises; may include food service as secondary to the amount of floor area and sales generated by the drink sales; separate and distinct from "restaurants."
BLANK WALL AREA
An area on the exterior facade of a building which does not include any windows or door openings; substantial change in materials; or columns, pilasters, archways or other form of articulation or relief greater than eight inches in depth.
BUILDING FACADE
See "facade."
BUILDING HEIGHT
The height of a structure measured in feet or in stories. Building height is measured from the average grade level at the front facade to the mean height between the eaves and the roof peak (for sloped roof structures) and to the top of the parapet (for flat roof structures.)
CANOPY
A wall- and/or post-mounted structure providing shade and cover from the elements for pedestrians; similar to "awning," except that cantilevered portions are supported by posts instead.
CLUB, INDOOR
An organization catering exclusively to members and their guests to promote nonprofit social, educational, athletic, service or recreational objectives, with no vending, merchandising or commercial activities conducted except as required generally for the membership and purposes of the club; includes private veteran, fraternal, social or health clubs; does not include outdoor recreational fields or courts.
CLUB, LIVE PERFORMANCE
A nightclub establishment which is designed to provide live music performances to a general audience of more than 50 people and includes the retail sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages on the premises; separate and distinct from "assembly or auditorium."
COMMERCIAL AMUSEMENT, INDOOR
An indoor facility primarily designed to provide recreational sports activities, including but not limited to billiard tables, bowling alleys, painball courses, video arcades, batting cages or similar gaming activities and amusements; does not include outdoor games.
CULTURAL CENTER
A building and land used for the purposes of public education or entertainment, including museums, libraries, art galleries, community centers, institutional philanthropic uses and similar facilities; does not include theatrical performances, performing arts, dance and music programs, concerts or similar large public gathering events.
DAY-CARE HOME
A family home, which is a personal residence and occupied as a family residence, which provides child day care on a regular basis for compensation or otherwise; includes both "group family day-care homes" and "family day-care homes" as defined in Parts 416 and 417 of Title 18 of the New York Code of Rules and Regulations, respectively.
DRY CLEANING
An establishment which provides professional dry-cleaning services for consumers who drop clothing and textiles off to be processed off site and returned; does not include on-site dry-cleaning processing.
FACADE
The exterior vertical wall of a building.
FACADE TRANSPARENCY
The percentage of the facade wall area which includes openings for transparent glass windows and doors. Facade transparency at the first-floor/ ground-floor level is measured between two feet above grade to 12 feet above grade. Facade transparency for upper floors is measured from second-finished-floor level to the ceiling of the topmost floor. Glass is considered transparent when it has a visible light transmission (VLT) rating of 70% or higher.
GALLERY
An exterior covered passage which runs along the ground-floor facade of a building and is open at one side.
GREENSPACE
Exterior land areas covered by vegetation meeting the landscape requirements of this code which are free from impervious surfaces such as built structures, driveways, parking lots, paved areas or walkways.
HOME OCCUPATION
Any occupation, business or professional activity which results in a product or service and which is conducted in whole or in part in a residential dwelling or on a residentially zoned property and is clearly subordinate in space utilization and intensity to the residential use.
HOTEL
An establishment where overnight lodging is provided in guest units rented to the public on a daily or weekly basis and in which ingress and egress to and from all guest units are made through an enclosed corridor; does not include "boardinghouses."
LAUNDROMAT
Business premises equipped with individual clothes-washing and clothes-drying machines for the use of retail customers, exclusive of laundry facilities provided as an accessory use in a multiple dwelling; may include pickup and dropoff of dry cleaning which is conducted off site in a separate facility.
LOT
A piece, parcel or plot of land occupied or to be occupied by a principal building and its accessory building or buildings, including the yards and other open spaces required by this chapter.
LOT AREA
The total horizontal surface area included within the property lines of a parcel.
LOT DEPTH
The horizontal distance between the midpoints of the front and rear lot lines measured in the general direction of the side lot lines.
LOT FRONTAGE
The property line along the front of a parcel which directly abuts a public or private street, accessed by that street.
LOT WIDTH
The distance between the side lot lines measured across the required front yard minimum setback line parallel with the street.
MEDICAL SERVICES, OUTPATIENT
A facility or clinic for the treatment and medical care of minor human ailments without any overnight inpatient bed facilities; includes eye doctors, dentists, medical clinics, emergent care facilities, lasik eye surgery, physical therapy and similar treatments.
MUNICIPAL OFFICE or PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITY
A building or lands used for common civic institutions, such as state, county and municipal government offices, post offices, police stations, fire stations and emergency ambulance service providers under contract to serve the municipality.
NURSING HOME
A licensed facility, other than a hospital, where elderly or infirm persons who are unable to care for themselves are provided with twenty-four-hour care consisting of lodging, meals, personal grooming and cleaning, supervision for medication and other therapeutic needs, recreation and companionship by trained and licensed staff.
OFFICE
Offices for the practice of licensed professionals and general business, such as lawyer, accountant, banking, travel agencies, insurance or real estate sales, engineer, architect, doctor, marketing, consulting, not-for-profit organizations and similar professions.
PARKING, STRUCTURED ABOVE-GRADE
A parking facility or deck that includes one or more levels above grade; separate and distinct from parking structures at or below grade or surface parking.
PARKING, STRUCTURED BELOW- OR AT-GRADE
A parking facility located entirely below grade, or at grade within the footprint area of a building overhead; separate and distinct from an above-ground parking structure or surface parking.
PERSONAL CARE
Personal services for the improvement of mind and body, including nail or hair salons, musical and dance instruction, yoga, karate, licensed massage therapy, physical therapy, fitness center and similar activities.
PORCH
An covered but unenclosed exterior entryway to a structure which is raised above ground level and accessed by stairs or a ramp.
PRIMARY FACADE MATERIAL
The exterior building facade material which comprises or covers the majority of the facade. See also: "secondary facade material."
PRIMARY STREET
A street, public or private, which has frontage along the front yard of a corner property. See also: "secondary street."
PUBLIC OPEN SPACE or PARK
A natural or landscaped outdoor area provided for the purpose of active or passive public recreation or enjoyment; may include publicly accessible outdoor amenities, such as a playground, seating area, picnic area, multi-use path and temporary or permanent small outdoor performance space or similar outdoor recreational functions.
RELIGIOUS FACILITY
Churches, synagogues and similar places of worship, Sunday school buildings, parish houses and rectories.
REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE, LIGHT
On-site repair or maintenance of personal property, such as household electronics, computers, appliances, watches, jewelry or shoe repair, tailoring, upholsterers and similar light work stored and conducted within an enclosed building; does not include repair of heavy machinery.
RESIDENCE, MIXED-USE MULTIFAMILY
A structure containing both allowable commercial uses on the ground-floor level as well as residential dwelling units on upper floors for two or more families.
RESIDENCE, MULTIFAMILY
A structure containing residential dwelling units for two or more families, including apartments, condominiums, townhouses, rowhouses or other combinations.
RESTAURANT
A business primarily engaged in the retail sale of food sold for on-premises consumption to patrons seated at tables or counters and where table service is provided; separate and distinct from "drive-thru restaurant" or "bar and tavern."
RESTAURANT, DRIVE-THRU
A food service establishment which includes a drive-thru window.
RESTAURANT, OUTDOOR SEATING
Any restaurant, bar or tavern where some, or all, of the customer seating is provided outside of the building on a porch, patio, deck or balcony.
RETAIL
Retail sales of goods to private consumers, including food and groceries, clothing, dry goods and miscellaneous retail services such as reproduction, printing and faxing services; Separate and distinct from "retail with drive-thru."
RETAIL, DRIVE-THRU
Retail sales of goods or services to private consumers with a vehicle drive-thru area, including pharmacies, banks, dry-cleaning, photo processing, coffee or similar businesses.
RETAIL, OUTDOOR DISPLAY
Retail sales of items stored or displayed outdoors, including but not limited to trees, plants, flowers, landscaping structures, fences, gazebos, cemetery headstones, playground equipment, lumber or similar items; does not include motorized equipment or vehicles.
SCHOOL, NURSERY OR K-12
A facility licensed by New York State and designed to provide daytime care or instruction for five or more children from two to 18 years of age, inclusive, and operated on a regular basis.
SCHOOL, VOCATIONAL
A secondary school designed to teach or train students for a specific trade or job.
SECONDARY FACADE MATERIAL
Exterior building facade materials which are used as a relatively small percentage of the overall materials such as decorative trim, accents and design features. See also: "primary facade material."
SECONDARY STREET
A street, public or private, which has frontage along the side yard of a corner property. See also: "primary street."
SENIOR HOUSING
A building or a group of buildings primarily and specifically designed for providing residential dwellings for persons age 55 or older.
SHOPFRONT
The ground-floor portion of a commercial building which is constructed primarily from glass so as to showcase merchandise or services being offered within.
STOOP
A small exterior staircase which leads from a public sidewalk up to a landing outside the entrance of a private dwelling, office or other space, typically not higher than five or eight feet above the ground.
TRANSIT HUB
A public transportation or intermodal facility designed to accommodate large numbers of people transferring from one mode of transport to another, with parking facilities for private vehicles.
TRANSIT NODE
A public transportation waypoint designed to accommodate small numbers of people transferring from one mode of transport to another, used as a satellite branch of a larger transit hub; may include an enclosed building or outdoor shelter with a limited drop-off area for private vehicles and buses; does not include parking.
UTILITY, GENERAL PUBLIC SERVICE
Structures or uses required as part of providing basic local public services, including but not limited to electrical substations, telephone exchanges, water pumping stations, power and communication lines and their necessary right-of-way; does not include telecommunication towers.
UTILITY, TELECOMMUNICATION TOWERS
Stand-alone structures in excess of 20 feet tall for the broadcast of radio, television, cellular or similar communication systems; does not include transmission elements with an approved design to be mounted onto the facade of a building, such as local wifi or cellular service.

§ 208-29 Appendix.

A. 
Staggered hours parking.
Table A.1 - Sample Adjustments for Staggered Hours Parking
Use Type
Weekdays
Weekends
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
6 p.m. - 12 a.m.
12 a.m. - 8 a.m.
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
6 p.m. - 12 a.m.
12 a.m. - 8 a.m.
Residential
50%
100%
100%
80%
100%
100%
Office
100%
20%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Retail/ Commercial
90%
80%
5%
100%
70%
5%
Restaurant
70%
100%
10%
70%
100%
20%
Civic Institution
100%
20%
5%
10%
10%
5%
Religious Institution
10%
5%
5%
100%
50%
5%
Bar/ Entertainment
40%
100%
10%
80%
100%
50%
Movie Theater
40%
80%
10%
80%
100%
10%
Hotel
70%
100%
100%
70%
100%
100%
EXAMPLE: Two adjacent property owners (or a single property owner with multiple uses) wish to share a parking lot which takes advantage of staggered hours parking demands. One use is an office building which normally requires 30 parking spaces. The other use is residential apartments which also normally would require 30 spaces. Normally, these two uses would require a total of 60 spaces. However, since the parking demand for these two uses isn't always experiencing peak demand at the same time of day, a reduction can be applied.
During weekday business hours (8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.) the office use needs 100% of its parking, so it would need all 30 of its parking spaces. During that same period, however, the residential use only needs 50% of its total parking, so it would only need 15 of its 30 spaces. The remainder of the time slots for each use are also filled out as follows:
Table A.2
Use Type
Weekdays
Weekends
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
6 p.m. - 12 a.m.
12 a.m. - 8 a.m.
8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
6 p.m. - 12 a.m.
12 a.m. - 8 a.m.
Residential
15 (50%)
30 (100%)
30 (100%)
24 (80%)
30 (100%)
30 (100%)
Office
30 (100%)
6 (20%)
2 (5%)
2 (5%)
2 (5%)
2 (5%)
Total Spaces Needed:
45
36
32
26
32
32
Adjusting for the fluctuations, this shared parking area would experience its highest combined peak demand during the 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. weekday time slot, when 45 parking spaces would be needed. The remaining time slots are each less than that, so this parking lot would only be required to provide 45 spaces instead of the original 60.
B. 
Clifton Park Town Center Plan - design concepts.
C. 
Environmental justice.
(1) 
Increased attention has been given to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) related to its ability to balance overall mobility benefits of transportation projects agains protecting quality of life of low-income and minority residents of a community. President Clinton issued Executive Order 12898 to bring attention to environmental and human health impacts of low-income and minority communities-referred to as "environmental justice" - when federal funding is involved. The goal of environmental justice review is to ensure that any adverse human health or environmental effects of a government action, such as a federally supported roadway or transit project, does not disproportionately affect minority or low-income residents of a community or neighborhood. Environmental justice is a public policy objective that can help improve the quality of life for those whose interests have traditionally been overlooked. "EJ population areas" are defined as any census tract with significant populations of minority or low-income persons.
(2) 
The CDTC staff has completed a review of civil rights/environmental justice impacts of transportation actions proposed under this study. Based on a review of the latest socioeconomic data available, the CDTC staff has determined that there are no census, tracts within the study area that contain significant environmental justice populations.
D. 
Environmental mitigation.
(1) 
CDTC-mapped environmental features within a quarter mile of the study area boundary (see Environmental Mitigation Features Map). Environmental mitigation features within the study area and within a quarter mile of the project site include several water features, wetlands and an aquifer.