Village of Mazomanie, WI
Dane County
By using eCode360 you agree to be legally bound by the Terms of Use. If you do not agree to the Terms of Use, please do not use eCode360.
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Adopted by the Village Board of the Village of Mazomanie 6-25-1996. Amendments noted where applicable.]
GENERAL REFERENCES
Historic preservation — See Ch. 246.
Zoning — See Ch. 415.
A420a Maz Downtown Historic Dist Map

§ A420-1 Introduction.

A. 
The Mazomanie Historic Preservation Plan is a document that presents goals, policies and procedures regarding the community's historic resources in a single, basic document. It is the basis for the Village's historic preservation program.
B. 
The Historic Preservation Plan is written specifically for the Mazomanie Downtown Historic District and will also be used to provide direction for the other historic assets within the Village of Mazomanie.
C. 
The Mazomanie Downtown Historic District is located within the center of downtown Mazomanie. It includes properties along Brodhead, Hudson and Crescent Streets within the center of the Village. The railroad corridor is also within the district. Many property owners, including the Village government, are involved.
D. 
Among the reasons for a preservation plan are the following:
(1) 
To clearly state the goals of historic preservation in Mazomanie.
(2) 
To let current and future property owners and residents know what the community wants to protect.
(3) 
To educate and inform citizens about their heritage and its value to the community.
(4) 
To encourage economic development through the preservation of historic resources.
(5) 
To create an agenda for future preservation activities.
(6) 
To comply with legislation requiring a preservation plan and provide meaning to the local historic preservation ordinance.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 246, Historic Preservation.
(7) 
To strengthen the political understanding of and support for historic preservation policies.

§ A420-2 Historic district description.

The Mazomanie Downtown Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 19, 1992. One building within the district, the Mazomanie Town Hall (49 Crescent Street), was placed on the Register earlier on October 20, 1980.
A. 
Boundaries.
(1) 
The Mazomanie Downtown Historic District is located wholly within the Village of Mazomanie in Dane County, Wisconsin. The boundaries include all those lots or portions of lots within a six-block area historically associated with the buildings within the district and such portions of the railroad yard as are necessary to create a coherent whole. The district is bordered on the south by the length of the now discontinued east-west running Exchange Street, on the east by Cramer Street and the now covered-over tail race of the Mazomanie Mill, on the west by Brodhead Street, and on the north by Hudson Street.
(2) 
A map with specific boundaries is a part of this document.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: The map is included at the end of this chapter.
B. 
General character.
(1) 
The Mazomanie Downtown Historic District is divided into visually distinct north and south portions, each of which is distinguished by markedly different land usage. The south portion of the district consists of a broad, elongated, crescent-shaped parcel of flat land at the foot of the slope and constitutes the central portion of the railroad corridor that bisects the Village from east to west. Most of this south portion was and is given over to the railroad usage although nearly all the buildings and structures that were historically associated with the railroad within the district, including the water tank, the pump house, and the round house and turntable, have now been demolished. Today, this portion of the district contains four contributing buildings, one of which is associated directly with the railroad and the others with the various manufacturing and processing concerns that once utilized the land adjacent to the railroad. These buildings are the Mazomanie Electric Power Plant and Village Hall (118 Brodhead), the Mazomanie Railroad Depot (102 Brodhead), the Lynch and Walker Flouring Mill (114 Cramer), and the outbuilding associated with the mill.
(2) 
The north portion of the district contains the more densely built-up commercial center of the Village. Most of Mazomanie's retail store buildings face east and west onto Brodhead Street, the principal north-south thoroughfare of the Village. As a consequence, Brodhead Street serves as both the principal thoroughfare of the Mazomanie Downtown Historic District and its main entranceway as well. The view of the district seen from Brodhead Street at the top of the High Street slope is also the finest in the Village and the one most frequently seen by visitors exiting from US Highway 14.
(3) 
The north portion of the district contains 30 buildings in all, of which 13 front on Brodhead Street, seven front on Hudson Street, and the remaining 10 front on Crescent Street. Two of these buildings are small frame construction garage buildings associated with larger district buildings, two are single-family residential buildings whose dates of construction and placement between other district buildings warrant their inclusion within the district (34 E. Hudson and 53 Crescent), one is noncontributing to the district because of the substantial alterations made to its exterior (1 Brodhead), and two are noncontributing to the district because of the late date of their construction (41 and 37 Crescent). The remaining 23 buildings include all of the surviving buildings associated with Mazomanie's commercial history not otherwise included in the south part of the district. These buildings can be divided into two basic types: freestanding buildings built mostly to shelter small manufacturing, agricultural and industrial processing or warehousing concerns and more densely packed commercial specialty store buildings, most of which are placed in rows and are joined by party walls, forming continuous blocks of buildings. Regardless of type, most of the buildings within the district are faced in either brick or stone and none of them is more than two stories in height.
C. 
Architectural character.
(1) 
Collectively, the buildings within the district represent the continuous evolution of the various building styles associated with commercial buildings in Mazomanie through eight decades of the Village's history, beginning with the frame construction Greek Revival style John Davidson Store Building (23 Hudson) built in 1859 and ending with the late Tudor Revival style Mazomanie Community Building (9-11 Brodhead) built in 1935. With the exception of the Italianate style J. A. Schmitz Block (18 Brodhead) and the buildings just mentioned, nearly all the rest are examples of various stages in the development of the Commercial Vernacular and the Astylistic Utilitarian forms. District examples of the Commercial Vernacular form in particular are characterized by the understated designs of their principal facades and by their restrained use of ornamentation, regardless of the period during which they were built. In general, most of the district buildings exhibit a high degree of integrity for buildings of these types even though nearly all of them have experienced some exterior or interior changes. This is especially true of the commercial specialty stores that line Brodhead and Hudson Streets. Almost all of these buildings have had their first floor display windows modified to conform to more modern taste in the last two decades. Fortunately, most of these modifications are reversible and many of the cast-iron window frames and most of the decorated cast-iron columns that originally enframed the display windows are still intact beneath the later alterations.
(2) 
The mix of building types and styles found in the district illustrates every phase of Mazomanie's commercial history and every phase of the architectural evolution of the buildings which represent this history. The buildings within the district are also representative of the larger patterns of stylistic evolution that shaped similar commercial buildings in other area communities. What makes Mazomanie significant as an exemplar of this progression, however, is both the completeness of the extant examples in terms of the styles represented and the relatively high degree of integrity that buildings within the district display.

§ A420-3 History and significance.

A. 
Because the Mazomanie Downtown Historic District contains almost all of the surviving resources in the Village that were built specifically for commercial activity prior to 1935, the history of commercial activity in Mazomanie and the history of the district are essentially one and the same.
B. 
The first settlers of European origin in this area arrived in December of 1843 as the agents of the British Temperance Emigration Society, which had been formed in December of 1842 and had headquarters in Liverpool, England. The declared object of the society was to raise a fund by weekly contributions to buy land in the State of Wisconsin and to secure to each settler a farm of eight acres with improvements, the whole not to exceed the value of £40. The first settlers then began to arrive in June 1844 and they promptly began the arduous task of making the land over into farms. The community that developed was overwhelmingly devoted to farming and was so thinly spread over the landscape that the only settlement of any size in the vicinity between 1845 and 1850 was the now vanished Village of Dover, located some three miles west of the eventual site of the Village of Mazomanie.
C. 
The railroad that was to transform this area was the Milwaukee and Mississippi Railroad, the successor to Wisconsin's first railroad, the Milwaukee and Waukesha. While the Milwaukee and Mississippi railroad was in process of construction through our state and the line was being surveyed through the town, the directors of the road noticed that a fine location presented itself for a village, north and west of the bluff on Section 16. They observed that by maintaining a proper grade in building their road, a fine water power could be developed by making the grade serve the purpose of confining the waters of Black Earth Creek for a distance of about 3/4 of a mile and determined to take advantage of the circumstances thus presented to lay the foundations of a thriving village. Accordingly, after purchasing a portion of the northwest quarter of said Section 16, Messrs. E. H. Brodhead, Eliphalet Cramer, Anson Eldred and Moses Scott, as proprietors, joining with Abram Ogden, a previous owner, laid out what is known as the original plat of the Village. This was in the early part of the year 1855.
D. 
The first buildings constructed in the new village were shanties built for the railroad construction crew. These temporary buildings were immediately followed by the first buildings of the residents of the new village and then their commercial buildings.
E. 
These new commercial buildings were all clustered along Brodhead Street and its intersection with Hudson Street. This concentration of buildings around the juncture of local roads and the railroad created the beginnings of a commercial core whose location was to determine the pattern of subsequent commercial development in the Village.
F. 
In June of 1856, the railroad reached Mazomanie and on June 10 the new community commemorated this event with a great celebration that drew people from the entire area. With the coming of the railroad, population and building activity in the Village boomed and on November 15, 1856, the Madison Patriot reported that Mazomanie now contained about 80 buildings of all types, among which were many new mostly frame construction commercial buildings (all nonextant). In 1857, the first buildings included within the Mazomanie Downtown Historic District were built. The first of these was a new railroad depot built to replace the one constructed in 1855 and destroyed by fire in 1856. In the same year, the Milwaukee firm of Lynch and Walker purchased the water power created by the construction of the railroad and built the original portion of the stone-over-frame construction Lynch and Walker flour mill. Both literally and figuratively these two 1857 buildings were of the greatest importance to the local economy. With the construction of the mill local farmers now had a means of turning their crops into a salable product and the railroad gave them the means to transport this product to market, thereby ensuring the success of agriculture in the vicinity.
G. 
Besides the mill and the depot, only a single pre-1860 commercial building still exists in the district today, the Greek Revival style John Davidson Store Building (2 E. Hudson), built ca. 1859. All the rest of the original buildings have fallen victim either to fire or to larger buildings that were built on their sites.
H. 
In 1860, the first manufacturing concern of importance was established in the Village when the firm of J. Warren and Co. built a large three-story brick and stone building on Crescent Street for the purpose of manufacturing fanning mills. These small hand-operated wood and metal mills were designed to separate wheat from chaff and they sold widely to farmers both within and outside the region. Fire destroyed this factory in 1865 and it was replaced and enlarged by N. T. Davies, who added a foundry and machine shop and succeeded in rebuilding the business. His new building lasted until 1877 when it too burnt down. Undaunted, Davies once again rebuilt it and this factory building survived for many years until it was finally demolished in 1970 and replaced by the new Municipal Building. Other factories (nonextant) were also built in the Village during this period, including several that also produced fanning mills. Two early factories that still survive from this period are the John Parman Blacksmith Shop (105 Crescent) and the first portion of C. J. Trager's Carriage Manufacturing Building (38 Crescent) built ca. 1868. Both Parman's and Trager's principal business was the manufacturing of carriages and wagons and these businesses soon evolved into substantial Village industries.
I. 
The coming of the Civil War put a temporary curb on the building of new commercial store buildings, and only two buildings from the war period still survive in the district. These are the Charles Butz Store Building (8-10 Brodhead) and the Frank Dietz Store Building (4 Brodhead), both built ca. 1863. By the end of the war, however, business in the Village grew rapidly.
J. 
J. B. Stickney (Mazomanie's railroad freight agent during the 19th century) states that the period of best business activity was from 1860 to 1870. During this time, the population of the Village nearly doubled (to 1,143 in 1870) and the population of the township, outside of the Village, increased by 53% (to 570 in 1870). The farmers came from a distance of 30 miles from Mazomanie, and for an average business day in 1870 the number of teams on the streets was three times greater than in 1900. There was little or no building during the later sixties, but the trade brought by the farmers made busy and profitable times for the merchant, laboring man and artisan.
K. 
Stickney's comments notwithstanding, a number of commercial buildings survive in the district that were built immediately after the war and they are notable as a group for their two-story brick facades. These buildings include the F. Heydecke and Co. Store Building (6-8 E. Hudson), built ca. 1866; the Jonathan Jones Store Building (10-12 E. Hudson), built ca. 1867; the Peters Family Store Building (29 Brodhead), built ca. 1865; and the Crosby Store Building (39 Brodhead), built ca. 1866.
L. 
The 1870's in Mazomanie were quiet by comparison with the 1860's and business activity and population growth both leveled off during this period. Only three buildings within the district were built during this decade: the J. A. Schmitz Block (18 Brodhead), built in 1879; the now greatly altered D. W. Bronson & Son Block (1 Brodhead), built in 1877; and a major addition to the C. J. Trager Carriage Manufacturing Building, built in 1875. Mazomanie's manufacturing activity continued at about the same level as well, with the more successful of the existing factories experiencing modest growth.
M. 
By 1880, the population of the Village of Mazomanie had begun to decline and by 1885 it stood at 1,024, a loss of 119 people since 1870 during a period when the Town of Mazomanie added 520 people for a total of 1,544. Only one building within the district was built during the 1880's. This was the Masonic Lodge Block (2 Brodhead), built in 1888. The only significant addition to the local manufacturing scene during the 1880's was the creation of the Mazomanie Knitting Factory in 1881, which was housed in a frame building located on a site now occupied by the Mazomanie Electrical Power Plant and Village Hall (118 Brodhead). This factory turned out knit hosiery, mittens, scarfs, underwear and caps and employed up to 60 people until it closed in 1891, after which the building was recycled by the Village as the forerunner of the later Municipal Hall.
N. 
As the 19th century neared its end, Mazomanie settled into a period of consolidation during which the economic activity of the Village became focused almost entirely on the agriculturally based economy of the surrounding area. Such manufacturing as still existed centered increasingly on creating finished products out of the crops and produce brought to market by local farmers and included such items as cheese, eggs, cream, and butter. The retail sector also adjusted to the relatively static nature of the local economy and evolved into a rural area trading center. Despite the economy, more buildings were added to the district in the 1890's than at any time since the 1860's. These buildings included the A. J. Lamboley Block (28-34 Brodhead), built in 1891; the A. E. Diment Store Building (14 E. Hudson), built in 1898; the Henry Lappley Store Building (18 E. Hudson), built in 1898; the C. R. Vogel Store Building (25 Brodhead), built in 1891; and the Joseph Hausmann Store Building (31 Brodhead), built in 1890. The impetus for constructing these new buildings did not necessarily come from the need for expanded business quarters, however, as the Lamboley Block, Vogel Store, and Hausmann Store were all constructed after fires destroyed earlier frame construction buildings on their sites.
O. 
By the turn of the century, Mazomanie's population had declined still further to around 990, but otherwise the level of business activity in the Village does not appear to have changed significantly. By 1900, the commercial core of the Village had, for the most part, attained the appearance it still has today. A few changes were still to come, however, beginning in 1900 when separate fires destroyed a large portion of the Lynch and Walker Flouring Mill and the former Mazomanie Knitting Factory, which was then being used as the Village Hall and Power Plant. The mill was promptly rebuilt in the form it has today and the Village built a new stone-over-frame Village Hall. Little else was done in the first decade of this century that altered the appearance of the district, and by 1905 the Village population had reached a modern low of about 900. Even so, several smaller buildings were constructed in this decade around the peripheries of the district. These buildings include William Rienow's concrete block Meat Market Building (30 E. Hudson), built in 1907; Phillip Hamm's Livery Barn (46 E. Hudson), built in 1908; and the Mazomanie Sickle Building (46 Crescent), built in 1902.
P. 
The 1910's saw the population of the Village begin to grow once again to approximately 1,000 in 1915, but the only change within the district was the demolition in 1907 of a small one-story brick bank building on Brodhead Street that had been constructed for James Cowdrey in 1873. This building was then replaced by a two-story addition to the Lamboley Block.
Q. 
The 1920's left more of a mark on the district than did the previous decade and witnessed the construction of the last of the retail store buildings to be built within the district. These buildings were Paylow's Department Store (14 Brodhead), built in 1923, and the W. C. P. Weinschenk Store Building (13-15 Brodhead), also built in 1923. The construction of these two buildings resulted in the demolition of the last remaining frame construction commercial retail buildings in the district that dated from the years prior to 1890. A more significant change occurred when the first buildings within the Village designed to serve the automobile were built. The largest of these buildings were two one-story brick garages (both nonextant), one of which was located just to the west of the Hamm Livery Stable on Hudson Street and the other on the corner of Crescent and State Streets. A third building still survives. This is the small Sunrise Oil Co. filling station (101 Crescent), built in 1925 and located just across Crescent Street from the now vanished garage building mentioned above.
R. 
The last building constructed in the district until the 1950's was the Mazomanie Community Building. (9-11 Brodhead), built in 1935.
S. 
Mazomanie was a village of greater commercial importance during the period of its significance than the other villages in the area and this importance was originally manifested in Mazomanie's larger number of business enterprises and in its larger number of buildings of all types connected with these enterprises. Today, Mazomanie is unusual among its local peers in that so many of the buildings associated with its commercial history are still extant and survive in a largely intact state, and this situation is all the more unusual given the early date of construction of so many of these buildings. The survival of these Mazomanie buildings as a still intact group is a matter of importance in a day when such buildings are increasingly threatened by obsolescence and by the complexities of the demands being made on older resources in small rural communities as these villages try to find new roles in modern economic life. Thus, the Mazomanie Downtown Historic District is locally significant because its commercial history is representative of the commercial history of other similar communities in the area and is also the most extensive and varied. This significance is heightened by the number and variety of its numerous intact resources and resource types which together make a significant contribution towards the understanding of the area's commercial history.

§ A420-4 Rationale for historic preservation.

The Village of Mazomanie, along with other Wisconsin communities, has become increasingly concerned about preserving historically and architecturally significant buildings and sites. There are multiple rationale and benefits to be derived from preservation.
A. 
Sense of place. Perhaps the most important rationale is the desire of the community to regain and protect a "sense of place." Much of the American landscape has gone the way of billboards, standardized housing projects, franchise businesses and other indistinguishable building projects. Many of the features that distinguish one community from another have been lost to new construction, destruction and remodeling. The uniqueness of our community or those things that make downtown Mazomanie what it is must be protected. The buildings and landmarks within the Downtown Historic District provide us with our "sense of place" or belonging.
B. 
Economic benefit. Preservation can be a significant economic benefit. As more people are placing a value on uniqueness and ties with our various heritages, business and property owners are realizing clear financial advantages in maintaining and protecting historic structures. Americans are searching out those places that can provide a connection to the past. The Downtown Historic District is a drawing card to shoppers and tourists. Furthermore, changes in tax regulations as embodied in the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 provide financial incentives for preserving historic buildings and sights. Also, rehabilitation of old buildings if often more economical than building anew.
C. 
Resource conservation. Preservation of older buildings and districts is one of the most cost-effective ways of conserving resources. Frequently, the quality of construction in older buildings cannot be matched by newer construction practices. Extending the life of these older buildings not only retains the quality built into them but also reduces our reliance on new materials.
D. 
Individual accomplishment. Finally, one of the most rewarding rationale for preservation is the fostering or awakening of community pride as individuals become involved in projects to save their heritage. In Mazomanie, individuals who have already participated in preservation either through the protection and maintenance of individual sites or through participation in various committees have derived a feeling of pride and accomplishment in contributing to the community in a manner which may be handed down to future generations. Many residents have a strong personal commitment to preserving values which are symbolized in the structures we have built.

§ A420-5 Historic preservation goals.

The following goals state the intent of municipal and public decisions and actions relating to historic preservation:
A. 
Preserve and maintain historic sites which reflect or represent elements of the Village's cultural, social, economic, political and architectural history.
B. 
Educate residents and visitors to the Village of Mazomanie about the history of the community as reflected and represented in historic sites.
C. 
Stabilize and improve historic property values in the Village of Mazomanie.
D. 
Preserve and enhance the appearance and aesthetic values associated with historic sites.
E. 
Enhance the economic vitality and livability of historic neighborhoods.
F. 
Foster civic pride in the beauty and noble accomplishments of the past.
G. 
Conserve natural resources and energy that are embodied in older structures.
H. 
Promote economic development which incorporates the preservation and continued use or reuse of historic structures.
I. 
Coordinate historic preservation with other planning and development programs of the Village of Mazomanie. These include, but are not limited to, economic development, land use planning, park and recreation planning, capital improvement programming and neighborhood planning.

§ A420-6 Historic preservation policies.

The following policy statements should guide the Historic Preservation Commission and the Village Board in designating landmarks, landmark sites and historic districts and reviewing proposals for changes or improvements on these properties.
A. 
Policies for designation.
(1) 
All structures, sites and historic districts eligible for or listed in the National Register of Historic Places should be considered for local preservation designation.
(2) 
Any improvement, site or historic district, whether eligible for the National Register or not, may be designated a local landmark for any of the following reasons:
(a) 
The structure, site or district exemplifies or reflects the broad cultural, political, economic or social history of the nation, state or community;
(b) 
The structure, site or district is identified with historic personages or with important events in national, state or local history;
(c) 
The structure site or district embodies the distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type inherently valuable for a study of a period, style, or method of construction or of indigenous materials or craftsmanship; or
(d) 
The structure, site or district is representative of the notable work of a master builder, designer or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age.
B. 
Policies for exterior alterations.
(1) 
The distinguishing original qualities or character of a building, structure or site and its environment should not be destroyed. The removal or alteration of any historical material or distinctive architectural feature should be avoided.
(2) 
All buildings, structures, and sites should be recognized as products of their own time. Alterations which have no historical basis and which seek to create an earlier appearance shall be discouraged.
(3) 
Changes which may have taken place during the course of time are evidence of the history and development of a building, structure or site and its environment. These changes may have acquired a significance in their own right, and this significance should be recognized and respected.
(4) 
Distinctive stylistic features or examples of skilled craftsmanship which characterize a building, structure or site should be treated with sensitivity.
(5) 
Deteriorated architectural features should be repaired rather than replaced. In the event replacement is necessary, the new material should match the material being replaced in composition, design, color, texture and other visual qualities. Repair or replacement of missing architectural features should be based on accurate duplications of features, substantiated by historical physical or pictorial evidence rather than conjectural designs or the availability of different architectural elements from other buildings or structures.
(6) 
The surface cleaning of structures should be undertaken with the gentlest means possible. Sandblasting and other cleaning methods that will damage the historic building materials shall not be undertaken.
(7) 
Every reasonable effort should be made to protect or preserve archaeological resources affected by, or adjacent to, any acquisition, protection, stabilization, preservation, rehabilitation, restoration or reconstruction project.
C. 
Policies relating to new construction in historic districts.
(1) 
The mass, volume and setback of proposed structures should appear to be compatible with existing buildings in the immediate area.
(2) 
The facade of new or remodeled structures should maintain a compatible relationship with those of existing structures in terms of windowsill or header lines; proportion of window and door openings; horizontal or vertical emphasis of major building elements; and extent of architectural detail.
(3) 
The building materials and colors used should complement and be compatible with other buildings in the immediate area.
(4) 
The sizing, design and placement of signs should fit the building and be comparable to signs in adjacent structures.
(5) 
All landscaping and parking provisions should compliment and be compatible with improvements in the immediate area.
D. 
Policies relating to demolition.
(1) 
No building or structure should be demolished if it is of such architectural or historic significance that its demolition would be detrimental to the public interest, contrary to the general welfare of the Village of Mazomanie or detract from the general historic character of the Historic District.
(2) 
Any new structure which is proposed to be constructed or any change in the use which is proposed to be made should be compatible with the buildings and environment of the historic district in which the subject property is located.

§ A420-7 Preservation guidelines.

The following preservation guidelines represent the principle concerns of the Historic Preservation Commission regarding this historic designation. However, the Commission reserves the right to make final decisions based upon particular design submissions. These guidelines shall be applicable only to the Downtown Historic District. Nothing in these guidelines shall be construed to prevent ordinary maintenance or restoration and/or replacement of documented original elements.
A. 
Guidelines for rehabilitation These guidelines are based upon those contained in the Historic Preservation Ordinance for the Village of Mazomanie.[1] These guidelines are not intended to restrict an owner's use of his/her property but to serve as a guide for making changes which will be sensitive to the architectural integrity of the structure and appropriate to the overall character of the district.
(1) 
Roofs.
(a) 
Retain the original roof shape. Avoid making changes to the roof shape which would alter the building height, roofline, pitch or gable orientation. Dormers, skylights and solar collector panels may be added to roof surfaces if they do not visually intrude on those elevations visible from the right-of-way.
(b) 
Retain the original roofing materials, wherever possible. Avoid using new roofing materials that are inappropriate to the style and period of the building and neighborhood.
(c) 
Replace roof coverings with new materials that match the old in size, shape, color and texture. Avoid replacing deteriorated roof coverings with new materials which differ to the extent from the old in size, shape, color, and texture that the appearance of the building is altered.
(2) 
Exterior finishes.
(a) 
Masonry.
[1] 
Unpainted brick or stone should not be painted or covered. Avoid painting or covering natural stone and unpainted brick. This is likely to be historically incorrect and could cause irreversible damage if it was decided to remove the paint at a later date.
[2] 
Repoint defective mortar by duplicating the original color, style, texture and strength. Avoid using mortar colors and pointing styles which were unavailable or not used when the building was constructed.
[3] 
Clean masonry only when necessary to halt deterioration and with the gentlest means possible. Sandblasting brick or stone surfaces is prohibited.
[4] 
Always replace or repair deteriorated material that duplicates the old as closely as possible.
(b) 
Stucco. Repair stucco with a stucco mixture duplicating the original as closely as possible in appearance and texture.
(c) 
Wood.
[1] 
Retain original material, whenever possible, and avoid removing architectural features such as half-timbering, window architraves and doorway pediments. An architrave is a molded ornament skirting the head and sides of a door or window. These are in most cases essential parts of a building's character and appearance that should be retained.
[Amended 12-8-2006 by Ord. No. 2006-2]
[2] 
Repair or replace deteriorated material with new material that duplicates the appearance of the old as closely as possible. Avoid covering architectural features with new materials which are inappropriate or were unavailable when the building was constructed, such as artificial stone, brick veneer, asbestos or asphalt shingles, or vinyl or aluminum siding.
(3) 
Windows and doors.
(a) 
Retain existing window and door openings that are visible from the public right-of-way. Retain the original configuration of panes, sash, lintels, keystones, sills, architraves (molded ornaments skirting the head and sides of a window or door), pediments, hoods, doors, shutters, and hardware. Avoid making additional opening or changes in the principal elevations by enlarging or reducing window or door openings to fit new stock window sash or new stock doors sizes. Avoid discarding original doors and door hardware when they can be repaired or reused.
[Amended 12-8-2006 by Ord. No. 2006-2]
(b) 
When replacing window sash and doors, respect the stylistic period or periods a building represents and duplicate the original window sash and door design. Avoid using inappropriate sash and door replacements such as unpainted, galvanized aluminum storm and screen window combinations or plastic metal strip awnings or fake shutters. Avoid using modern-style window units such as horizontal sliding sash in place of double-hung sash or the substitution of units with glazing configuration not appropriate to the style of the building.
(4) 
Porches, trim and ornamentation.
(a) 
Retain and avoid altering porches and steps visible from the public right-of-way that are historically and architecturally appropriate to the building.
(b) 
Retain trim and decorative ornamentation, including copings, cornices, cresting, finials, railing, balconies, oriels, pilasters, columns, chimneys, bargeboards or decorative panels. An oriel is a bay window, especially one built out from a wall and resting on a bracket or similar support. Repair or replace, when necessary, deteriorated material with new material that duplicates the old as closely as possible.
[Amended 12-8-2006 by Ord. No. 2006-2]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 246, Historic Preservation.
B. 
Guidelines for streetscapes. Maintain the height, scale, mass and materials established by the buildings in the district and the traditional setback and density of the block faces. Use traditional landscaping, fencing, retaining walls, signage and streetlighting which are compatible with the character and period of the district.
C. 
Guidelines for new construction. It is important that new construction be designed so as to harmonize with the character of the district. A positive feature of the Downtown Historic District is that it is an eclectic collection of buildings representing a broad range of architectural styles, dating from the 1860's to the 1930's. It is not the intention of this plan that new construction should try to emulate or copy past styles. It is the intention of the plan that new construction should reflect the traditional siting, scale and form of existing buildings. Siting refers to setback distance, spacing between buildings, their orientation and their relationship to each other. Scale refers to the overall height and bulk of new buildings and their compatibility with existing structures. Form refers to the profiles of roofs and building elements which project and recede from the main block. New construction should express the same continuity established by existing buildings within the historic district.
D. 
Guidelines for demolition. Although demolition is not encouraged and is generally not permissible, there may be instances when demolition may be acceptable if approved by the Historic Preservation Commission. The following guidelines shall be taken into consideration by the Commission when reviewing demolition requests:
(1) 
Condition. A demolition request may be granted when it can be clearly demonstrated that the condition of a building or a portion thereof is such that it constitutes an immediate threat to health and safety.
(2) 
Importance. Consideration will be given to whether or not the building is of historical or architectural significance or displays a quality of material and craftsmanship that does not exist in other structures in the area.
(3) 
Potential for restoration. Consideration will be given to whether or not the building is beyond economically feasible repair.
(4) 
Additions. Consideration will be given to whether or not the proposed demolition is a later addition which is not in keeping with the original design of the structure or does not contribute to its character.
(5) 
Replacement. Consideration will be given to whether or not the building is to be replaced by a compatible building of similar architectural style and scale.
E. 
Fire escapes. Additional required fire escapes shall be designed and located so as to minimize their visual impact from the public right-of-way.
F. 
Signs. The installation of any permanent exterior sign other than those now in existence shall require the approval of the Commission. Approval will be based on the compatibility of the proposed sign with the historic and architectural character of the building and the district.

§ A420-8 Historic preservation strategy.

The program noted in this section consists of specific strategies for implementing the goals identified in § A420-5. The major features of the action program are four distinct strategies which combine the use of education, regulatory powers, economic incentives, and Village improvement programming. All of these strategies will require input and action from the members of the Historic Preservation Commission, the Mazomanie Historical Society, the Village Board and the Village staff. In general, the Historic Preservation Commission, with assistance from the Mazomanie Historical Society, should be charged with educational and public information responsibilities, designating landmarks and historic districts and reviewing changes to improvements on such properties. The Village Board should be the appeal review body for all regulatory actions of the Historic Preservation Commission. The Village staff should be responsible for keeping minutes of Historic Preservation Commission actions and serving as a liaison between the Village Board, the Historic Preservation Commission and the general public.
A. 
Education strategy. In general, the Historic Preservation Commission and Historical Society should provide a program for public information. The Historic Preservation Commission members will organize and conduct most of the public information programs associated with historic preservation. The Village staff will be available to provide some clerical and support help, but the impetus for education will need to be sponsored by the Historic Preservation Commission and Historical Society. Specific education programs may include the following:
(1) 
Conduct walking tours and workshops.
(2) 
Publish brochures and literature.
(3) 
Provide plaques and signs where appropriate and resources permit identifying historic sites.
(4) 
Provide video tape or other audiovisual materials promoting historic preservation.
(5) 
Work with individual property owners to explain the historic preservation goals and policies of the Village.
(6) 
Provide technical information to property owners and other individuals on construction techniques associated with preservation and suggest methods to meet the design guidelines contained in the Historic Preservation Ordinance.
B. 
Regulatory strategy. The Village's development regulations should be used to require the preservation and maintenance of designated landmarks. The Historic Preservation Commission should be charged with designating landmarks, landmark sites and historic districts and reviewing proposals for changes to improvements on these properties.
[Amended 12-8-2006 by Ord. No. 2006-2]
C. 
Economic incentive strategy. The financial advantages to business and property owners in maintaining and preserving historic structures provide the "carrot" element of the program for historic preservation. Increased property values and business activity provide the primary economic incentives; these are supplemented by incentives provided by tax regulations and the possibility of public financial assistance. The federal government through its tax incentive programs and grants-in-aid program has maintained a public policy of providing economic incentives for historical preservation. Through block grant programs and other techniques for providing local development incentives, such as tax incremental financing, the Village has the opportunity to provide additional incentives for historic preservation. The following specific actions are recommended as a means of implementing an economic incentive strategy for historic preservation:
(1) 
The Historic Preservation Commission should provide written material and communicate through other media concerning the availability of federal tax incentives for historic preservation. In particular, information on the twenty-five-percent tax credit program for improvements to certified commercial and income-producing property as provided by the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 should be made widely available.
(2) 
The Village Board should explore the opportunity of utilizing federal block grant funding for loans or grants for the rehabilitation of locally designated landmarks.
(3) 
The Village Board should consider establishing a revolving loan fund from general revenue or other local revenue sources to assist the rehabilitation of locally designated landmarks.
(4) 
Potential low-interest loans may be available from local lending institutions for facade improvements.
D. 
Village municipal property strategy. Several historic buildings are publicly owned structures. The Village has the opportunity to set an example, act as a steward and be a leader in the area of historic preservation by assuring that public capital improvements are sensitive to the historic integrity of landmarks and historic districts. The following specific steps should be taken to screen public actions for historic sensitivity:
(1) 
All Village improvement programs which will impact designated landmarks or properties identified in the intensive survey as significant should be reviewed by the Historic Preservation Commission.
(2) 
All proposed Village improvements within designated historic districts should be reviewed by the Historic Preservation Commission for historic sensitivity. Where affordable, street furniture, public lighting and pavement surfaces within historic districts should be designated to integrate into the character of the district.

§ A420-9 Relationship to other planning activities.

Historic preservation planning is most meaningful if it is coordinated with other planning activities of the Village of Mazomanie. The Historic Preservation Plan reflects this coordination in two ways:
A. 
Goals.
(1) 
The goals for historic preservation must compliment and reinforce community goals as expressed in the soon to be developed Village Master Plan. At its most general level, historic preservation planning reinforces the concern for the aesthetic and visual elements of the urban experience. Preservation of historic structures and districts is viewed as part of an overall program to encourage quality urban design.
(2) 
The goals of historic preservation planning also restate and reinforce the Village's goals for economic development and revitalization. The economic benefits of historic preservation have been well documented nationwide. These benefits range from high job creation ratios and spin-off economic benefits to properties adjacent to historic structures to cost-effectiveness of rehabilitation over new construction.
B. 
Specific implementation.
(1) 
The strategies for implementation of historic preservation goals are closely associated with the downtown revitalization strategies already being implemented in the Village of Mazomanie.
(2) 
The action program described in this plan is designed to integrate into the efforts of Village staff and the Village Board. The Historic Preservation Commission is expected to work closely with each of these groups to coordinate its historic preservation efforts with other planning activities in the Village.