Town of Westminster, MA
Worcester County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
A. 
Granite or precast reinforced concrete bounds, four feet long by six inches square at the top, shall be set at points as indicated on the approved plan. Such bounds shall be set in gravel with their tops at the proposed sidewalk surface grades, unless otherwise directed. A hole 1/2 inch in diameter and one inch deep shall be drilled in the bound at the exact point of survey reference.
B. 
All underground utilities, including surface water drains, shall be installed and all ways shall be constructed by the subdivider at his own expense, in accordance with the grades approved by the Planning Board. Subdividers shall comply with the details and specifications shown on Figures 2 through 8[1] and to any other specification as indicated on the approved plan.
[1]
Editor's Note: Figures 2 through 8 are included at the end of this chapter.
C. 
Residential roads shall consist of at least 18 inches of gravel after compaction in accordance with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, 1967 Standard Specifications, Sections 401 and 405, or as amended, and treated with a prime coat of MC-1, applied at a rate of 0.3 gallon per square yard, the binder course shall be 2 1/2 inches thick and the top course shall be 1 1/2 inches thick after rolling so as to form a compacted final pavement depth of four inches as shown on in Figure 2. Commercial roads shall be designed to the same specifications as residential roads except for a two-inch base, after compaction, should be applied before the binder course and final course so as to form a compacted final pavement width of six inches as shown in Figure 2A.
D. 
Granite curb inlets conforming to Figure 4 will be required at every catch basin.
E. 
All sewers, surface water drains, water pipes and any other underground facilities, together with their appurtenances, shall be installed only after the subgrade of the way has been established.
F. 
The excavating of trenches, the methods and material of backfilling and all other matters relating to the installation of water pipes, sewer lines, storm drains and subsurface drains shall be consistent with good construction practices and shall at all times be subject to the inspection of the applicable Town departments (Figure 8).
G. 
Connections for all utilities from the main structure to the exterior line of the way shall be constructed for each lot, whether or not there is a building thereon.
H. 
The subdivider shall protect improvements required under the subdivision rules and regulations, including utilities, streets, curbings, sidewalks, etc., from any and all damage, until the entire subdivision is completed and approved as a whole by the Planning Board. Any damage to these utilities, etc., prior to the approval by the Planning Board, shall be repaired in a manner satisfactory to the Planning Board, the full cost of which shall be borne by the subdivider. Any material used which does not meet the standards as set forth in these regulations shall be replaced by the subdivider at his own expense. Underground utilities and appurtenances not installed in accordance with the final grade approved by the Planning Board shall be removed and reset to proper grade at the expense of the subdivider.
I. 
Where the grade of the way is above or below the grade of the adjacent land, walls or slopes shall be constructed by the subdivider in conformance with the recommendations of the Planning Board.
J. 
Curbing shall be sloped granite edging on all intersections, culs-de-sac and all other radii. Cape Cod berm Type I dense mix shall be allowed in all remaining sections (Figure 5).
A. 
Bituminous concrete pavement shall conform to Massachusetts Department of Public Works, 1967 Standard Specifications, Section 460, and designated as Class I binder course, top course and dense mix (for curbings).
B. 
Residential subdivisions shall have a two-and-one-half-inch binder course and a one-and-one-half-inch top course. Industrial and commercial subdivisions shall have two-inch binder courses and a two-inch top course. The Planning Board may require a greater width of way where deemed necessary to handle either the traffic generated from within or outside of the subdivision. All drainage structures shall be coated with 3,000 psi air-entrained concrete and coated with asphalt cement, in accordance with the Westminster DPW requirements, before final paving.
C. 
Before application of the finish coat, the bituminous concrete base shall have been in place for a minimum of 12 months or for a lesser period as may be determined by the Board. A machine-applied tack coat shall be applied over a cleaned bituminous binder course prior to installation of final paving course.
All sidewalks shall be designed meeting all applicable accessibility requirements; constructed as shown on Figures 2 and 2A,[1] and shall be of bituminous concrete. Sidewalks shall be five feet wide with a base of eight inches of suitable gravel in accordance with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, 1967 Standard Specifications, Sections 401 and 405, or as amended, and a surface of Type I-1 bituminous concrete, 2 1/2 inches in depth laid in two courses, one-and-one-half-inch binder and one-inch top.
[1]
Editor's Note: Figures 2 and 2A are included at the end of this chapter.
There shall he constructed for each lot a driveway ramp not less than 14 feet in width at the gutter line as shown on the plan entitled "Typical Driveway Cross Section” (Figure 3).[1] All driveways shall be designed to meet the specifications of the Westminster DPW. In addition, driveway cuts into streets shall be prohibited until the Planning Board finds that the location, width, length, line of sight, grades, proximity to other driveways and streets, grade and elevation will provide adequate provisions for the public safety. Driveway cuts shall not be permitted within 100 feet of the sideline of intersecting streets or railroad crossings. No more than one driveway cut shall be permitted per lot.
[1]
Editor’s Note: Figure 3 is included at the end of this chapter.
All signage, street signs, stop signs, stop bars, and crosswalks, in accordance with the US Department of Transportation Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, shall be installed within the subdivision.
A. 
Trees shall be Sugar maple (or other species approved by the Planning Board) with a diameter of two to three inches measured four feet from the ground level and shall be eight to 10 feet tall. The trees shall be nursery grown and planted in a hole at least one foot in diameter larger than the root system, and the developers must apply good grade of loam, mixed with bog peat and bovung or a good grade of organic fertilizer.
B. 
There shall be minimum of two trees per lot in residential subdivisions. These two trees shall be planted anywhere in the front yard area as defined in Chapter 205, Zoning.
All subdivisions shall be provided with adequate fire protection installation and maintenance in accordance with the requirements of the Westminster Fire Department entitled "Fire Protection Water Supply Regulations."
During construction, a sightly appearance shall be maintained. Upon completion of all work on the ground, the applicant shall remove all temporary structures and all surplus material and rubbish and shall leave the work in a neat and orderly condition. Waste materials, debris, and discards shall be removed to and disposed of at a place and in a manner approved by the Board of Health and the Planning Board.
The applicant shall maintain the roads for vehicular travel in a manner satisfactory to the Board. Further, the applicant shall maintain the road and all other improvements within the subdivision, in a condition which meets all the above requirements to the satisfaction of the Board until acceptance of such roads by vote of the Town.
A. 
The applicant shall control erosion and sedimentation during construction according to the objectives, principles and design considerations set forth in the following publications: "Residential Erosion and Sediment Control," published by the Urban Land Institute, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the National Association of Home Builders, 1978; and "Soil and Water Conservation in Urbanized Areas of Massachusetts," published by the USDA Soil Conservation Service, Amherst, 1975. These publications are hereby incorporated as part of these regulations. If it is determined by the Conservation Commission or the DPW that the erosion control plan is not working, then the plan shall be revised. Failure to respond shall result in cease-and-desist of all site activity until the revised plan is approved.
B. 
When directed by the Town, the applicant shall clean up, in a timely manner, any sand, dirt, or debris which erodes from the subdivision onto any public street or private property, and to remove any silt or debris that enters any existing drainage system including catch basins, sumps, pipelines, manholes, and ditches.
All earth removal incidental to the subdivision of land shall receive an earth removal permit from the Board of Selectmen before the commencement of any earth removal activity.
A. 
Any submission of a subdivision requiring substantial cuts, earth removal in excess of 3,000 cubic yards, creating 1,000 feet or more of roadway/street, or creating more than 10 lots, and all nonresidential subdivisions shall be accompanied by four copies of an environmental and community impact analysis, as determined during the preliminary plan process. The environmental and community impact analysis shall assess the relationship of the proposed development to the natural and man-made environment of Westminster. This report shall be prepared by an interdisciplinary team of professionals qualified and experienced and, where applicable, licensed in their field. Such teams shall typically consist of registered professional engineers, traffic engineers, architects, landscape architects, land use planners, hydrogeologists, hydrologists, and other environmental professionals.
B. 
It is intended that the report be a guide to the Planning Board in its deliberations and will build into the Board's decision-making process an appropriate and careful consideration of the environmental and community impacts of the proposed development.
C. 
For each of the components of the environmental and community impact analysis listed under this section, each of the following concerns must be separately addressed.
(1) 
The environmental and community impacts of the proposed development. All primary and secondary environmental and community impacts, both beneficial and adverse, as a result of the proposed development. This section shall include all impacts resulting from the construction phase as well those resulting from project completion.
(2) 
Adverse impacts which cannot be avoided should the proposed development be implemented. The report shall describe the kinds and magnitudes of adverse impacts which cannot be reduced in severity or which can be reduced in severity but not eliminated.
(3) 
Alternatives to the proposed development. The report shall develop, describe and objectively weigh alternatives to the proposed development which are allowed pursuant to the Westminster Zoning Bylaw.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 205, Zoning.
(4) 
Measures to be used to minimize adverse environmental and community impacts. Corrective and protective measures which will be taken, as part of the project, to minimize adverse impacts shall be described in detail.
D. 
The Planning Board as part of a review for a preliminary subdivision plan, submitted in accordance with the requirements of § 231-11, shall specify which of the following topics shall be evaluated and the level of detail required for each topic in the environmental and community impact analysis and submitted with the definitive plan. If no preliminary plan is submitted, the environmental and community impact analysis shall evaluate all of the following topics.
(1) 
Traffic analysis. A complete analysis of the traffic flow of the proposed development and impacts of traffic on levels of service on affected intersections.
(2) 
Community impact analysis. Describe the effect of the project on community services including public safety (police and fire protection), public water and sewer, drainage and stormwater management, roadways, waste disposal, and educational services.
(3) 
Natural environment.
(a) 
Air and noise pollution. The impact of local air quality and noise from the proposed development, including traffic generated from the development both during construction and after completion, shall be evaluated. The Planning Board may require detailed technical reports of such impacts.
(b) 
Water pollution. The impact of stormwater runoff on adjacent and downstream surface watercourses and subsurface groundwater shall be evaluated. Dangers of flooding as a result of increased downstream runoff, especially peak runoff and the impact of the proposed project on existing water table elevations, shall be analyzed. The location and type of wells located on abutting property within 100 feet of the property line of the proposed project shall be identified. The analysis shall include a report prepared and endorsed by a qualified Massachusetts hydrological engineer setting forth the location and elevation of the high groundwater table on the entire portion of the land to be excavated and the location of monitoring wells which have been used to establish high groundwater table. The highest elevation of the groundwater shall be determined by observation wells monitored during the months of April and May. The report shall include a soil log profile.
(c) 
Land. Compatibility of the proposed development with existing soils; the impact of any soils or other materials to be removed from the site; and the potential danger and impacts of erosion and sedimentation caused by the proposed development. The analysis shall include an erosion and sediment control plan. The Planning Board may require detailed soil borings.
(d) 
Water supply. The average and peak daily demand and the impact of such demands on groundwater aquifers, supplies and adjacent watercourses.
(e) 
Sewage disposal. The average and peak daily disposal and the impact of such disposal on groundwater aquifers, supplies and adjacent watercourses.
(4) 
Man-made environment.
(a) 
Existing neighborhood land use. Compatibility with adjacent or nearby land uses or approved private development plans, if known, or land use changes to occur during the life of the proposed development. If not compatible, reason therefor shall be detailed. Consultation with the Planning Board is strongly recommended.
(b) 
Zoning. Compatibility of proposed development with the purpose of the Zoning Bylaw[2] and the zoning district.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 205, Zoning.