City of Crystal Lake, IL
McHenry County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
The Virginia Street Design Guidelines are applicable to properties within the Virginia Street Corridor (VSC) Overlay District. The objective of these guidelines is to provide a set of design suggestions to enhance the performance and image of the corridor.
[1]
Editor's Note: The Virginia Street Corridor Guidelines are included as an attachment to this chapter.
The Pattern Book is a tool provided to Crystal Lake residents, that provides guidance for the City's built environment. Its goal is to promote design strategies for additions and new construction in established neighborhoods that is contextual and respectful to the existing character. The Pattern Book is available on the City website: www.crystallake.org.
Access management is the systematic control of the location, spacing, design, and operation of driveways, median openings, interchanges, and street connections to maintain safety at a roadway's full traffic carrying capacity. Implementing an access management program will encourage smooth and safe traffic flow on the City's roadways.
A. 
Roadway classification hierarchy. Per the UDO, City streets are classified as follows from highest to lowest:
1. 
Major arterial;
2. 
Minor arterial;
3. 
Major collector;
4. 
Minor collector;
5. 
Local street; and
6. 
Alley.
Major arterial, minor arterial, major collector and minor collector streets in the City are indicated on the Thoroughfare Plan included in the Appendix.
B. 
Design objectives. In reviewing an application for any development, the City Engineer shall determine that the following objectives have been met:
1. 
Adequate corner clearance from any adjacent street intersections has been provided to preserve the functional integrity of the intersection, and spacing from adjacent driveways is sufficient to safely minimize conflicts between traffic entering and exiting adjacent driveways;
2. 
Adequate stopping sight distance and intersection sight distance is provided;
3. 
Auxiliary lanes are provided as needed to:
a. 
Minimize speed differentials with mainline highway traffic;
b. 
Prevent the encroachment of turning vehicles on mainline traffic; and
c. 
Prevent the queuing of inbound traffic from impacting mainline traffic.
4. 
Sufficient storage distance between the curbline and the first point of conflict for traffic on the site is provided to prevent the spill back of traffic onto public streets. This distance shall be adequate to absorb the maximum peak period inbound traffic during the normal weekday;
5. 
Appropriate conflict reduction measures have been provided to safely manage inbound and outbound left turning traffic. Median design features and driveway channelization shall be used as appropriate to accomplish conflict reduction;
6. 
Access locations have been properly offset from driveways or street intersections located across the roadway in order to limit conflicts within the mainline or median of the street;
7. 
The design of the access satisfies standard geometric guidelines for turning radii, driveway slope, angle of entry, design speed and width. The drainage design of the access should not interfere with the drainage system in the public right-of-way;
8. 
The access provides for the safe crossing of pedestrians, bicyclists and the handicapped;
9. 
The installation of necessary traffic control devices for the safe and proper operation of the access meet the requirements of the MUTCD and, in the case of traffic signals, are located so as to allow for proper signal coordination and adequate left turn storage needs at the access and nearby intersections.
C. 
Required spacing. Spacing between adjacent access locations or a proposed access location and an adjacent street intersection shall be consistent with the following. Where the indicated spacing is met, there is a presumption that access will be permitted subject to satisfying the design objectives of Section A-400D below.
[Amended 6-3-2014 by Ord. No. 7034; 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
1. 
Access separation between driveways shall be measured from inside edge to inside edge of driveway and is measured at the point where both driveways' nearest points to each other meet the back of curb or edge of pavement.
2. 
The separation between a driveway and intersecting street shall be 30 feet and shall be measured from the nearest edge of the driveway at the back of curb or edge of pavement to the edge of the cross-street pavement.
3. 
For individual residential properties, the following limitation on the number of driveways applies:
a. 
One driveway for 70 feet or less of lot width frontage.
b. 
Two driveways for greater than 70 feet of lot width frontage.
D. 
Access.
1. 
Site plans and subdivision plats. Site plans and subdivision plats shall be designed to facilitate compliance with the spacing guidelines and access design objectives of this section at the time of development. Specific further objectives related to the development of subdivisions that shall be considered include:
a. 
Residential subdivisions shall not derive direct access from roadways with a freeway (or equivalent) designation.
b. 
Where lots in a proposed subdivision or development front on an arterial or major collector street as designated on the thoroughfare plan, options for designing access that meets the standards of this section include:
(i) 
The use of cross access easements in order to maintain private access points at intervals no less than 400 feet.
(ii) 
The use of lower level public streets to provide secondary access.
c. 
Vehicular ingress and egress restrictions along the frontage of arterial or higher level streets may be imposed by requiring subdivision plats to dedicate to the proper street authority access control authority.
d. 
Secondary access shall be required for major residential subdivisions with 100 or more lots.
e. 
Outparcels and phased development plans.
(i) 
In the interest of promoting unified access and circulation systems, development sites under the same ownership or consolidated for the purposes of development and comprised of more than one building site shall not be considered separate properties in relation to the access standards of this Ordinance. The number of connections permitted shall be the minimum number necessary to provide reasonable access to these properties, not the maximum available for that frontage. All necessary easements, agreements, and stipulations required by the City's Unified Development Ordinance shall be met. This shall also apply to phased development plans. The owner and all lessees within the affected area are responsible for compliance with the requirements of this code and both shall be cited for any violation.
(ii) 
All access to the outparcel must be internalized using the shared circulation system of the principle development or retail center. Access to outparcels shall be designed to avoid movement across parking aisles and queuing across surrounding parking and driving aisles.
2. 
Shared access/cross access.
a. 
A system of joint use driveways and cross access easement shall be required between adjacent lots fronting on major arterial, minor arterial and major collector streets in order to minimize the total number of access points along those streets and to facilitate traffic flow between lots. The location and dimensions of said easement shall be shown on any subdivision or site plan and approved by the City Engineer.
b. 
Building sites utilizing shared access and/or cross access shall incorporate the following:
(i) 
A continuous service drive or cross access corridor extending the entire length of each block served to provide for driveway separation consistent with the access management classification system and standards.
(ii) 
A design speed of 10 miles per hour and sufficient width to accommodate two-way travel aisles designed to accommodate automobiles, service vehicles, and loading vehicles;
(iii) 
Stub-outs and other design features to make it visually obvious that the abutting properties may be tied in to provide cross-access via a service drive;
(iv) 
A unified access and circulation system plan that includes coordinated or shared parking areas is encouraged wherever feasible.
A cross access corridor is generally required for a nonresidential use adjacent to other commercial, office, industrial or multifamily development along an arterial or major collector.
3. 
Recorded easements. Pursuant to this section, property owners required to provide shared or cross access easements shall:
a. 
Record an easement with the deed allowing cross access to and from other properties served by the joint use driveways and cross access or service drive;
b. 
Record an agreement with the deed that remaining access rights along the thoroughfare will be dedicated to the City and preexisting driveways will be closed and eliminated after construction of the joint-use driveway;
c. 
Record a joint maintenance agreement with the deed defining maintenance responsibilities of property owners.
4. 
Direct access to individual one to four family dwellings shall be prohibited on major collector, minor arterial, and major arterial streets.
5. 
Reverse frontage.
a. 
Access to double-frontage lots shall be required on the street with the lower functional classification.
b. 
When a residential subdivision is proposed that would abut an arterial or collector street, it shall be designed to provide through lots along the arterial with access from a frontage road or interior local road.
(i) 
Access rights of these lots to the arterial shall be dedicated to the City and recorded with the deed.
(ii) 
A berm or buffer yard may be required at the rear of through lots to buffer residences from traffic on the arterial. The berm or buffer yard shall not be located within the public right-of-way.
6. 
Emergency vehicle access. The purpose of this subsection is to ensure that all premises shall be readily accessible for emergency service vehicles, particularly fire-fighting equipment.
a. 
Emergency access required: Any developments which do not have frontage on a public street shall provide access for fire vehicles and emergency apparatus from a public street as follows:
(i) 
Dead-end access: A dead-end access exceeding 150 feet in length shall be provided with a turning radius or area of not less than those prescribed in the cul-de-sac requirements of the UDO.
(ii) 
Fire lanes:
I. 
A fire lane at least 20 feet wide shall be required to provide access to any portion of any structure which is more than 150 feet from the nearest street right-of-way when the structure is 30 feet or less in height;
II. 
A fire lane at least 24 feet wide shall be required to provide access to any portion of any structure which is more than 50 feet from the nearest street right-of-way when the structure exceeds 30 feet in height.
III. 
When fire vehicles and emergency apparatus are provided access to any portion of a structure more than the distance from a street right-of-way specified in the subsection above, by means of either buffer yard area or adjoining property, the requirements of Subsection (II) above, may be waived by the Fire Chief.
In addition to the situations above which require a fire lane, a fire lane to provide access to any part of a building may also be required if the Fire Chief determines that the distance of a structure from the nearest hydrant, the configuration of structures on a site, or other special characteristics of the site otherwise inhibit rapid, effective fire extinguishment.
7. 
Street structures. No driveway shall interfere with municipal facilities such as streetlight or traffic signal poles, signs, fire hydrants, cross walks, bus loading zones, utility poles, fire alarm supports, drainage structures, or other necessary street structures. The City Engineer is authorized to order and effect the removal or reconstruction of any driveway which is constructed in conflict with street structures. The cost of reconstructing or relocating such driveways shall be at the expense of the abutting property owner.
E. 
Driveway design.
1. 
All driveways shall meet the City's standard specifications for street construction and construction standards as set forth in the City Code.
2. 
Curb cuts for driveways shall not be permitted in the curb return of an intersection.
3. 
The curb return radii for driveways intersecting at right angles with the roadway and without a deceleration lane shall be as follows:
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
a. 
Curb return radii for commercial and multifamily driveways shall vary between 15 feet and 30 feet as shown on the City standard detail in Section A-600.
b. 
Curb return radii for driveway types not included in the above shall be determined by the City Engineer.
4. 
The angle of driveway approach shall be approximately 90° for two way drives and between 45° and 90° for one-way drives.
5. 
Restricted access: For the benefit of traffic safety and flow on collector and arterial streets, access points may be required to be designed to prohibit certain types of turning movements (for example, left turns out). Driveways not meeting the spacing guidelines in this Ordinance may be required to be designed for limited access by the addition of a channelizing island to the driveway (refer to the City Standard Details for additional information).
6. 
Deceleration lanes: For the benefit of traffic safety and flow on collector and arterial streets, tapered or channelized deceleration lanes for vehicles turning right into high volume or intersection type driveways shall be required if warranted by a traffic study.
a. 
Design of right-turn deceleration lanes shall be in accordance with IDOT Bureau of Local Roads standards.
b. 
The spacing requirements for driveways not meeting the specifications in this Ordinance may be lessened or waived by the City Engineer if tapered or channelized deceleration lanes are used.
7. 
Traffic signals: Access points on arterial and collector streets may be required to be signalized in order to provide safe and efficient traffic flow, but only if the intersection meets the signal warrant(s) specified in the latest edition of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD).
a. 
A development may be responsible for all or part of any right-of-way, design, hardware, and construction costs of a traffic signal if it is determined that the signal is necessitated by the traffic generated from the development.
b. 
A development may be required to post a letter of credit or bond meeting the City's minimum requirements to cover the costs of its assigned share of the traffic signal improvement.
8. 
Driveways on arterials with more than two lanes should incorporate channelization features. Double yellow lines may be considered instead of medians on major collectors or where truck traffic off tracking is a problem.
F. 
Driveway width.
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
1. 
Residential.
a. 
The maximum width of the residential driveway approach measured at the property line shall not exceed 20 feet in width and 25 feet at the street.
b. 
The minimum width of the residential driveway approach measured at the property line shall not be less than nine feet in width.
c. 
The minimum width for the driveway anywhere outside the public right-of-way is nine feet. Alternate widths may be approved by the City Engineer in cases of a legal nonconforming lot.
2. 
Nonresidential.
a. 
The maximum width of a nonresidential driveway approach measured at the property line for two-way operation shall not exceed 36 feet or for one-way operation shall not exceed 24 feet, except that the City Engineer may issue permits for driveway approaches greater than 36 feet in width on arterial or major collector streets to handle special traffic conditions.
b. 
The minimum width of a nonresidential driveway approach measured at the property line for two-way operation shall not be less than 24 feet or for one-way operation shall not be less than 14 feet.
G. 
Driveway length.
1. 
Residential. The length of a residential driveway shall be at least 20 feet long as measured between the garage (or interior end of driveway) and right-of-way line. This minimum driveway length ensures that a vehicle can be parked on the driveway without encroaching into the public right-of-way or blocking the sidewalk.
2. 
Nonresidential. The length of driveways or "throat length" shall be designed in accordance with the anticipated storage length for entering and exiting vehicles to prevent vehicles from backing into the flow of traffic on the public street or causing unsafe conflicts with on-site circulation. The driveway throat length shall be defined as the distance from the street to the first point of conflict in the driveway. Variation from these requirements shall be permitted for good cause upon approval of the City Engineer.
Table A-400-2 Minimum Driveway Throat Lengths
Number of Exit Lanes
Unsignalized Access Drives
(feet)
Signalized Access Drives
(feet)
Major Collector
50
100
Minor Arterial
75
100 (1-2 exit lanes)
200 (3 exit lanes)
300 (4 exit lanes)
Major Arterial
75
100 (1-2 exit lanes)
200 (3 exit lanes)
300 (4 exit lanes)
H. 
Redevelopment. Access connections to roadways in place as of the date of adoption of this Ordinance that do not conform with the standards herein are considered nonconforming. Properties with nonconforming connections should be brought into compliance with this Ordinance as changes to the roadway design allow or when an existing development is changed in any of the following ways:
1. 
Existing structure is replaced by a new structure or improvements; or
2. 
Existing structure or parking lot is expanded by 20% or more beyond the size existing at the effective date of this Ordinance (incremental changes that cumulatively increase the size by 20% or more fall within the regulated activities of this Ordinance); or
3. 
An existing use is changed to a use for which a higher parking ratio is specified.
Major Collector, Section C-1650 A-500-C-1.tif
Major Collector, Section C-2650 A-500-C-2.tif
Major Collector, Section C-3650 A-500-C-3.tif
Major Collector, Section C-4650 A-500-C-4.tif
Major Collector, Section MC-1650 A-500-MC-1.tif
Minor Collector, Section MC-2650 A-500-MC-2.tif
Minor Collector, Section MC-3650 A-500-MC-3.tif
Minor Collector, Section MC-4650 A-500-MC-4.tif
Minor Collector, Section MC-5650 A-500-MC-5.tif
Local Street, Section L-1650 A-500-L-1.tif
The City's Standard Details for construction are incorporated by reference and made a part of this Unified Development Ordinance. These details can be obtained by contacting the City's Engineering Division.
The details are also available on the City website: http://www.crystallake.org/departments/engineering/permits-and-development/construction-details-standards.
A. 
Pavement design and construction: Pavement Design and Construction shall be to the following standards:
1. 
Pavement thickness design: The City of Crystal Lake requires specific pavement structures to account for the different loading levels expected for each classification of roadway or parking lot. Refer to the following chart for the standard typical pavement thicknesses for the various roadway and parking lot classifications that do not require a separate administrative approval from the City Engineer.
Standard Pavement Sections - Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA)
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
Major/Minor Arterial
Major Collector
Minor Collector
Local/Alley
Parking Lots
Parking Lots - Heavy Duty
HMA Surface Course
1.5"
Mix D, N70
1.5"
Mix C, N50
1.5"
Mix C, N50
1.5"
Mix C, N50
1.5"
Mix C, N50
1.5"
Mix C, N50
HMA Binder Course
2.5"
IL 19, N70
4.5"
IL 19, N50
2.5"
IL 19, N50
4"
IL 19, N50
2.5"
IL 19, N60
2.5"
IL 19, N50
2.5"
IL 19, N50
2.5"
IL 19, N50
2.5"
IL 19, N50
HMA Base Course
8"
7"
6"
4"
Aggregate Base Course (CA-6, Grade #9)
4"
12"
4"
12"
4"
12"
4"
8"
10"
Standard Pavement Sections - Portland Cement Concrete
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
Major/Minor Arterial
Major Collector
Minor Collector
Local/Alley
Parking Lot (including heavy duty)
Portland Cement Concrete, Class PV
8"
8"
6"
6"
6"
Aggregate Base Course (CA-6, Grade #9)
8"
8"
8"
4"
4"
2. 
Alternate pavement design: The designer also has the option, with City Engineer approval, to utilize an alternate pavement structure with a structural number that meets or exceeds the standard designs established by the Engineering Division. The following Pavement Design Chart is intended to show the minimum structural number allowable for a particular street classification and parking lots if an alternate hot mix asphalt pavement design is utilized. A higher structural number may be required for those streets in manufacturing, business, and/or office areas.
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
Pavement Design Chart
Street Classification
Minimum Structural Number
(HMA)
Major/Minor Arterial
4.0
Major Collector
3.7
Minor Collector
3.5
Local/Alley
3.0
Parking Lot - Heavy Duty
2.7
Parking Lot
2.2
3. 
Structural coefficients: Structural numbers for any alternate designs shall be calculated using the following structural coefficients:
Common Structural Coefficients
Structural Coefficient
Coefficient
Portland Cement Concrete
0.50
Hot Mix Asphalt Surface Course
0.40
Hot Mix Asphalt Binder Course
0.33
Bituminous Base Course
0.25
Aggregate Base Course (CA-6, Grade #9)
0.13
Structural coefficients for other materials not listed in this Ordinance must be approved by the City Engineer.
4. 
Final surface placement: Final hot mix asphalt surface for public or private streets may be delayed upon approval of the City Engineer to avoid premature damage of final surface course if a performance surety covering 120% of the cost for the placement of the surface course is in place and only if a bituminous aggregate mixture pavement section is utilized.
5. 
Asphalt seams: Asphalt seams for bituminous base course, binder, and surface layers must be staggered by one foot.
6. 
Minimum thickness:
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
a. 
Surface course thickness: The minimum thickness for hot mix asphalt surface course shall meet the latest Illinois Department of Transportation specifications.
b. 
Binder lift thickness: The minimum lift thickness for hot mix asphalt binder shall meet the latest Illinois Department of Transportation specifications.
c. 
Aggregate base course thickness: The minimum thickness for aggregate base course shall be four inches.
7. 
Certification of pavement improvements: The City shall require street cores to be taken and tested at random intervals before the final wearing surface is applied, to certify that construction has met City requirements. If street core samples do not meet the required pavement design standards, an additional wearing course or other remedial action will be required.
8. 
Hot mix asphalt ramping: The hot mix asphalt binder course shall be ramped up to meet the top of the gutter flag and the top of all utility structures, such as sanitary sewer manholes, storm sewer inlets, valve vaults, and similar improvements. The binder course shall be ground off around the utility structures and around the gutter flag prior to placement of the final surface course. Refer to the City Standard Details in Appendix Section A-600 for additional information.
9. 
Construction season: All pavement materials can be installed from April 1 to November 1, weather permitting. Any work done after November 1 shall require authorization from the City Engineer. This authorization will in no way void the contractor's and developer's required guarantee on the work done.
10. 
Unstable ground: Whenever ground is encountered which, in the opinion of a soils engineer acceptable to the Engineering Division, is unstable either before preparation of detailed plans or during the construction phase of the proposed improvements, no paving for public or private streets shall be placed thereon until such unstable materials are removed in their entirety and replaced with satisfactory material which shall be adequately compacted, or the unstable material shall be adequately stabilized, all in accordance with recommendations rendered by such soils engineer and as approved by the City Engineer.
A. 
Sidewalk design and construction: Sidewalk design and construction shall be to the following standards:
1. 
Sidewalk materials.
a. 
No walk shall be poured unless the subgrade, compacted granular base, forms, grade and alignment have been inspected and approved by the Community Development Department.
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
b. 
Sidewalks shall be constructed on a well-compacted subgrade.
c. 
The base course shall consist of a minimum of two inches of compacted CA-6 gravel, Grade 8 or 9. Sand and pea gravel are not acceptable as a base course material.
d. 
The surface shall be constructed with a six-bag cement mix per cubic yard of concrete. The aggregate gradation incorporated shall meet the minimum requirements of Class S1 concrete as specified by IDOT Standard Specifications, Sections 703 and 704.
e. 
A curing compound shall be applied to all finished surfaces. Alternate methods of curing may be used as specified in Section 625.04 of the IDOT Standard Specifications.
2. 
Sidewalk design.
a. 
The finish grade of the sidewalk shall be established by the City Engineer. However, general criteria includes a minimum pitch to the street of 1/4 inch per foot of width, and the grade of the finished walk shall have sufficient fall from the edge of the walk to the curbline to provide sufficient drainage which shall be 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch per foot.
b. 
The sidewalk finish surface shall have a broom finish and shall have contraction joints on five-foot centers, and 1/2 inch full depth expansion joints every 50 feet. Expansion joints shall also be required where the walk abuts an existing walk, a curb, driveway, approach, building, or as directed by the City Engineer. Contraction joints shall not exceed 1/3 the thickness of the finished walk. All joints and edges of the walk shall be tooled. Preformed expansion joint material shall meet the requirements of Section 715 of the IDOT Standard Specifications.
c. 
Water service boxes shall not be located in the sidewalk slab. In the event of a conflict, the contractor shall contact the Public Works Department for further instructions.
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
d. 
The area around all walks and approaches must be backfilled, graded and seeded. Excess dirt and concrete must be cleaned away by the contractor, leaving the right-of-way in a neat, workmanlike condition.
e. 
The finish grade of the sidewalk shall meet the latest guidelines and standards of the American with Disabilities Act. General criteria includes a minimum pitch to the street of 1/4 inch per foot of width, and the grade of the finished walk shall have sufficient fall from the edge of the walk to the curbline to provide sufficient drainage which shall be 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch per foot.
[Added 6-3-2014 by Ord. No. 7034]
3. 
Cold weather pours: Special attention shall be given to pouring concrete in cold weather as follows:
a. 
Unless authorized by the City Engineer, the placing of concrete shall not commence unless the ambient air temperature is 35° F. and rising. Operations shall cease and finished work protected if the temperature drops below that level.
b. 
Protection after placing concrete shall be in place for at least four days as follows:
Cold Weather Protection
Minimum Temp.
Protection
25° F. through 32° F.
2 layers of polyethylene
Below 25° F.
12 inches of straw covered with 2 layers of polyethylene
c. 
If calcium chloride is added to the concrete mix, it may be added only in liquid form as part of the mixing water at the batch plant and shall not exceed 2% by weight of the amount of cement in the concrete.
d. 
No material containing frost shall be used.
e. 
No sidewalk shall be placed on a frozen base or subgrade.
4. 
Private sidewalks: The same material and construction specifications apply to sidewalks erected on private property.
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
5. 
Traffic control/pedestrian safety: It is the responsibility of the permit holder or his/her agent/contractor to supply warning devices, barricades, etc., to protect the work and to warn of any excavations, material stockpile, drop-offs, or any condition constituting a pedestrian or traffic hazard.
The steps described in the following hypothetical example are a simplified version of a full shared parking analysis. The applicant must provide operational data to support the presented percentages for maximum parking needs for different uses at different days and time. These percentages will be reviewed by the City and in certain instances, a review by the City's approved traffic consultant may be deemed necessary by the City Engineer.
A mixed-use development consisting of office, retail and entertainment uses is proposing to utilize shared parking. The number of originally required parking spaces for these different uses is as follows:
Use
Number of Parking Spaces
Office
200
Retail
320
Entertainment
125
Total
645
The percentages of maximum parking needed for these different uses at different days and times are determined as follows:
Weekday
Weekend
Overnight
Use
Daytime
Evening
Daytime
Evening
12:00 a.m. - 6:00 a.m.
Office
100%
10%
10%
5%
5%
Retail
60%
90%
100%
70%
5%
Entertainment
40%
100%
80%
100%
10%
Applying these percentages to the original number of required parking spaces yields:
Weekday
Weekend
Overnight
Use
Daytime
Evening
Daytime
Evening
12:00 a.m. - 6:00 a.m.
Office
200
20
20
10
10
Retail
192
288
320
224
16
Entertainment
50
125
100
125
13
Total
442
433
440
359
39
For this example, a parking reduction to allow shared parking from the originally required 645 spaces to the greater of the maximum parking required for the combination of uses at the same time (442) or 75% of the originally required parking spaces (484) is permissible. Therefore 484 spaces, a reduction of 161 spaces, shall be required for this development.
Elderly Housing/Assisted Living (Continuing Care Retirement Community)
0.4 parking spaces for each dwelling unit (Arlington, Mass., pop. 42, 389)
0.5 spaces per unit (Kearney, Nebr., pop. 27, 431; St. Charles, Ill., pop. 27, 896)
0.6 of a parking space for each unit (Fairfield, Conn., pop. 57,340)
1 space per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39, 673)
1 space per staff person during the shift with the maximum number of employees, plus 1 space per 4 residents. For assisted living facilities in the R-3 (single-family medium density) residential district that have agreed to prohibit residents from parking vehicles at the facility, the parking requirements may be reduces for the residents, provided at least 1 visitor space per 10 residents is available (Ormond Beach, Fla., pop. 36, 301)
1 space per dwelling unit (Mesa, Ariz., pop. 396, 375)
1 per each dwelling unit, plus 1 per every 3 employees (Royal Oak, Mich., pop. 60, 062)
1 space per staff person working the largest shift, plus 1 space per 4 residents (Ormond Beach, Fla., pop. 36,301)
1 per employee, plus 0.25 per bed or 0.25 per dwelling unit (Lakewood, Ohio, pop. 56,646)
1 for each 3 beds (Ewing Township, N.J., pop. 57,564)
2 spaces for each living unit (Harlingen, Tex., pop. 57,564)
Automobile Parts Store (Automotive Parts, Accessories and Tire Stores)
1 space per each 400 square feet of gross leasable area, plus 1 space for each employee on the maximum work shift (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39,673)
1 space per 350 square feet of gross floor area (Redding, Calif., pop. 80,365)
1 parking space per 800 square feet of floor area, plus site area (Huntsville, Tex., pop 35,078)
1 parking space for each 600 square feet of gross floor area (San Bruno, Calif., pop. 40,165)
4 per 1,000 square feet (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
Automobile Rental Establishment/Motor Vehicle Rental Establishment (Passenger Car Rental and Leasing)
1 per 300 square feet of gross floor area, plus adequate space for rental vehicles (Faribault, Minn., pop. 20,818)
1 per 400 square feet, plus 1 per rental vehicle (San Jose, Calif., pop. 894,943)
1 space per 400 square feet of gross floor area (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39,673)
1 space per 400 square feet of gross floor area of inside display, plus 1 space per 2,000 square feet of outside display, plus 1 space per 500 square feet of gross floor area of repair, plus 1 space per 300 square feet of gross floor area of parts storage and sales area (Garden Grove, Calif., pop. 165,196)
1 per 300 square feet indoor sales per office area, plus 1 per 1,500 square feet outdoor storage, plus 4 per service bay for repair per maintenance activities (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
1 space per 300 square feet, plus 1 space per 4,500 square feet of outdoor sales per display (Lenexa, Kans., pop. 40,238)
Car Wash - Full Service
Stacking for 30 vehicles or 10 per approach lane, whichever is greater, plus 3 spaces per bay for manual drying, plus 2 per 3 employees on largest shift (Greensboro, N.C., pop. 223,891)
Stacking area 5 times the capacity of the car wash, plus 1 parking space per employee (DeKalb, County, Ill., pop. 88,969)
Stacking for 30 vehicles or 10 per approach lane, whichever is greater, plus 3 spaces per bay for manual drying, plus 1 per employee on largest shift (Washington, N.C., pop. 9,583)
1 space per each employee, plus reserve spaces equal to 3 times the wash lane capacity (Yavapai County, Ariz., pop. 167,517)
1 space per 150 square feet of gross floor area (under main roof, including wash and detail areas) (Duncanville, Tex., pop. 36,081)
1 parking space per employee of the largest shift. Stacking for 5 vehicles for automatic car wash lane, plus 2 drying spaces for each washing stall (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39,673)
2 per washing stall (Missouri City, Tex., pop. 52,913)
3 spaces, plus 1 space for each manager or employee on the largest shift (Ormond Beach, Fla., pop. 36,301)
4 spaces, plus sufficient are for stacking spaces (North Miami Beach, Fla.)
Car Wash - Self Service
1 parking space for each employee, plus 1 space per owner or manager and reservoir space equals to 5 times the capacity of the facility (Bellevue, Ky., pop. 6,480)
1 space per 2 washing bays or stalls in addition to the washing are or stalls themselves (Duncanville, Tex., pop. 36,081)
2 stacking spaces per each washing stall, plus 2 drying spaces for each washing stall (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39,673)
2 spaces for drying and cleaning purposes per stall, plus 3 reservoir spaces in front of each stall (Yavapai County, Ariz., pop. 167,517)
3 stacking spaces per approach lane, plus 2 drying spaces per stall (Greensboro, N.C., pop. 223,891)
4 spaces for each stall (State College, Pa., pop. 38,420)
5 stacking spaces for each car-washing stall (DeKalb County, Ill., pop. 88,969)
Furniture Store
1 space for every 400 square feet floor area gross (Columbia, N.C., pop. 819, Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276,093)
1 parking space for each 500 square feet of gross floor area up 5,000 square feet, plus 1 parking space for each additional 1,000 square feet, plus 1 space for each employee (Boca Raton, Fla., pop 74,764)
1 per each 660 square feet of floor area (Eugene, Ore., pop 137,893)
1 space per 1,000 square feet of floor area (Gresham, Ore., pop. 90,205)
Home Improvement Center (Home Centers)
1 space per 200 square feet of gross leasable floor area (Grosse Ile Township, Mich., pop. 10,894)
1 per 400 square feet of gross floor area (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., pop. 152,397)
Hardware Store
1 space for every 400 square feet floor area gross (Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276, 093)
1 per each 660 square feet of floor area (Eugene, Ore., pop. 137, 893)
1 parking space for each 200 square feet of gross floor area, plus 1 parking space for each 1,000 square feet of the facility devoted to outside operations or storage, exclusive of the parking area (Indianapolis, Ind., pop. 781,870)
2 parking spaces, plus 1 additional parking space for each 300 square feet of floor area over 1,000 (Frisco, Tex., pop. 33,714)
3.29 spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Helena, Mont., pop. 25,780)
4 per 1,000 square feet (Hickory, N.C., pop. 25,780)
Bakery (Baked Goods Store)
1 space per each 350 square feet of gross floor area excluding storage areas which shall not exceed 15% of the gross square footage (St. Tammany Parish, La., pop. 191,268)
1 per 1,000 square feet or 1 per employee, whichever results in more spaces (Blue Springs, Mo., pop. 48,080)
1 space for each 250 square feet of net floor area (Lafayette, Calif., pop. 23,908, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., pop. 152,397)
1 for each 500 square feet of floor area or 5 spaces, whichever is greater (Memphis, Tenn., pop. 650,100)
3.5 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of gross leasable floor area (Plainfield, Ind., pop. 18,396)
4.5 parking spaces per each 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Naperville, Ill., pop. 128,358)
10 per 1,000 square feet; 5 per 1,000 square feet if no sit down eating area is provided (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
Liquor Store (Beer, Wine and Liquor Stores)
1 space per 250 square feet (Lenexa, Kans., pop. 40,238)
1 space per 200 square feet (Omaha, Nebr., pop. 390,007)
1 per 300 square feet of gross floor area restaurant, plus drive-through 1 per 40 square feet of dining area, plus 6 stacking spaces per drive-up lane (Faribault, Minn., pop. 20,818)
1 parking space is required per 150 square feet (Coral Springs, Fla., pop. 117,549)
3.5 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of gross leasable area shall be required for any individual free standing retail or service commercial use unless listed separately in this section, in which case the parking requirement noted for that specific use shall be utilized; provided, however, that in no case shall any individual use provide less than 5 parking spaces (Indianapolis, Ind., pop. 781,870)
4 per 1,000 square feet (Hickory, N.C., pop. 25,780)
Pharmacy/Drug Store
1 space for each 150 square feet of gross floor area (Grants Pass, Ore., pop. 20,003)
1 parking space for each 275 square feet of retails sales, office or work area, plus warehouse requirements for designated storage, receiving and shipping area not open to the public (Ormond Beach, Fla., pop. 36,301)
3 per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Tampa, Fla., pop. 303,447)
1 space per each 350 square feet of gross floor area excluding storage areas which shall not exceed 15% of the gross square footage (St. Tammany Parish, La., pop. 191,268)
1 space per 200 square feet (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531, Kennewick, Wash., pop. 54,693)
1 space per 250 square feet of gross leasable area (Ogden, Utah, pop. 15,026)
1 space per 300 square feet for stores 20,000 square feet and under and 1 space per 225 square feet for stores over 20,000 square feet (San Mateo, Calif., pop. 92,482)
3.5 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of gross leasable area shall be required for any individual free standing retail or service commercial use unless listed separately in this section, in which case the parking requirement noted for that specific use shall be utilized; provided, however, that in no case shall any individual use provide less than 5 parking spaces (Indianapolis, Ind., pop. 781,870)
4.5 parking spaces per each 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Naperville, Ill., pop. 128,358)
5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39673)
5.5 spaces for each 1,000 square feet of gross floor area for building over 3,000 square feet; all smaller buildings, 1 space for each 200 square feet (Evansville, Ind., pop. 121,582)
Department Stores
1 space for every 200 square feet floor area gross (including all aboveground and below-ground floors) (Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276,093)
1 space per 200 square feet (Columbia, Miss., pop. 6,603)
1 per each 250 square feet of usable floor area (Royal Oak, Mich., pop. 60,062)
Between 25,001-400,000 square feet of gross leasable area: 3.3 per 1,000 gross floor area; between 400,001-600,000 square feet of gross leasable area: 3.6 per 1,000 gross floor area; more than 600,000 square feet of gross leasable area: 4 per 1,000 gross floor area.
Retail Sales Establishment, bulk Merchandise (Warehouse Clubs and Supercenters)
A minimum of 5 and a maximum of 7 spaces for each 1,000 square feet of gross floor area depending upon the nature of the specific use (Redondo Beach, Calif., pop. 63,261)
1 space for each 200 square feet of gross floor area (Las Cruces, N. Mex., pop. 74,267)
Office Supplies Store
1 space per 250 square feet (Lenexa, Kans., pop. 40,238)
1 parking space is required per 300 square feet (Coral Springs, Fla., pop. 117,549)
8 spaces for each development up to 1,000 square feet of floor space and 1 additional space for each additional 300 square feet or portion thereof (Irving, Tex., pop. 191,615)
Pet Shop (Pet and Pet Supplies Stores)
1 per 250 square feet (Henderson, Nev., pop. 175,381)
Massage Establishment
4 per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Racine, Wisc., pop. 81,855)
6 spaces per 1,000 square feet with a minimum of 6 spaces (Costa Mesa, Calif., pop. 108,724)
Tattoo Parlor
1 space per 300 square feet of gross floor area in excess of 4,000 square feet (Minneapolis, Minn., pop. 382,618)
1 per 250 square feet of gross floor area (Broward County, Fla., pop. 1,623,018)
2 spaces per tattoo or body piercing artist (Knoxville, Tenn., pop. 173,890)
Funeral Homes
0.25 per seat of chapel capacity plus 0.33 per employee (Tampa, Fla., pop. 303,447)
1 per 3 persons capacity (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
1 space per 5 seats in largest chapel plus 1 space per employee, plus 1 space for each facility vehicle (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531)
1 space per 3 permanent seats plus 1 space per 25 square feet of temporary seating area (Lenexa, Kans., pop. 40,238)
Crematorium
0.25 per seat in chapel, plus 1 per employee (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
0.25 space per seat of chapel capacity, plus 0.33 space per employee (Spartanburg, S.C., pop. 39,673)
1 space per 32 square feet of area in parlor and assembly rooms (Bloomington, Ind., pop. 69,291)
1 per 4 seats or; 1 per 75 square feet of seating area if no fixed seats (Rohnert Park, Calif., pop. 42,236)
1 parking space per for each 50 square feet of floor area in parlors or assembly rooms (Plainfield, Ind., pop. 18,396)
1 per 4 seats or 100 square feet of chapel area, whichever is greater (Burlington, Vt., pop. 38,889)
Pool Hall (Billiards Parlor)
1 per billiard table (North Ogden, Utah, pop. 15,026)
1 space per 300 square feet (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531)
1 space per 3 persons based on the maximum occupancy, plus, 1 space per employee on the major shift (Smithfield, Va., pop. 6,324)
1 per 2 persons who may be legally admitted at 1 time based on the occupancy load established by local codes, plus 1 per employee, or 1 per 100 square feet of usable floor area, whichever is greater (Canton, Mich., pop. 76,366)
1 space for each 225 square feet of gross floor area, plus restaurant per bar seating requirements, as applicable (Ormond Beach, Fla., pop. 36,301)
1 space per 2 billiards tables, plus 1 space per 2 employees (Humboldt County, Nev., pop. 16,106)
4 parking spaces for each table (Platte County, Mo., pop. 73,781)
Bowling Alley
1 space for every 3 persons of maximum capacity permitted by fire regulations, plus 1 space per 200 square feet of gross floor area used in a manner not susceptible to such calculations (Yavapai County, Ariz., pop. 167,517)
2 spaces for each alley, plus 1 additional space for each 2 employees, plus 1 for each 100 square feet of gross floor area used or amusement or assembly (Canton, Mich., pop. 7,709)
2 spaces for each alley, plus 1 additional space for each 2 employees (Salisbury, N.C., pop. 26,462)
2 per bowling lane (Ithaca, N.Y., pop. 29,287)
4 spaces for each bowling lane (Burbank, Calif., pop. 100,316)
4.36 spaces per lane (Helena, Mont., pop. 25,780)
5 spaces per lane (Lycoming County, Pa., pop. 120,044 Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276,093)
Golf Courses
1 per 3 holes, plus 1 per each 2 employees (Eugene, Ore., pop. 137,893)
2 spaces per hole and 60 per tee time spacing (in minutes), 2 spaces per designated station on the driving range tee area, and 1 space per 50 square feet of dining area (indoor and outdoor combined), and 1 space per 300 square feet of retail sales area, and 1 space per golf course facility staff, and 1 space per 500 square feet putting and chipping green. For golf course facilities located adjacent to or within a resort to and from which the golf facility provides free motorized transportation (e.g. golf cart), the course golfer range user, diner and customer parking requirements stated above will be reduced by 30% (Phoenix, Ariz., pop. 1,321,045)
4 spaces per hole (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531)
5 spaces for each hole, plus 1 space for each employee, plus 1 space for each 4 seats within an accessory restaurant (Sugar Creek Township, Ohio, pop. 3,894)
6 spaces per hole (Lenexa, Kans., pop. 40,238)
36 per 9 holes (Las Cruces, N. Mex., pop. 74,267)
50 per 18 holes (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
50 spaces, plus 1 space for each 3 persons of total capacity where dining facilities are included (South Kingstown, R.I., pop. 27,921)
Country Club
1 space for each 3 persons, based on the maximum anticipated capacity of all facilities capable of simultaneous use as determined by the director of community development (Coconino County, Ariz., pop. 18,617)
1 space for each 3 members (Bedford, N.Y., pop. 18,133)
1 space per member or family member (Niagara Falls, N.Y. pop. 55,593)
1 per employee, plus 4 per golf green (Charleston County, S.C., pop. 309,969)
1 parking space for each 2 members, or accommodations such as lockers or seating capacity, which ever is greater, but not less than 4 parking spaces for each 1 hole, plus 1 parking space for each 3 seats in dining, bar and rooms for assembly (Platte County, M.O., pop. 73,781)
1 per 5 members (Staunton, Va., pop. 23,853)
1 space per 4 members based on maximum anticipated membership, plus 1 space per 2 employees on the major shift (Capistrano, Calif., pop. 33,826)
3 spaces per golf hole, plus 1 space for each 4 seats in an accessory restaurant or bar use (Ormond Beach, Fla., pop. 36,301)
Health Clubs
With: playing court, 1.8 per each playing court; viewing area, 1 per each 4.4 seats, 9.6 feet of bench, length, or 31 square feet of gross floor area; locker room, sauna, whirlpool, weight room, or gymnasium, 1 per each 83 square feet of gross floor area; lounge or snack bar area, 1 per each 66 square feet of gross floor area; pro shops or sales area, 1 per each 330 square feet of gross floor area; swimming pool, 1 per each 220 square feet of pool surface area (Eugene, Ore., pop. 137,893)
1 space per 4 persons based on the maximum allowable occupancy (Provo, Utah, pop. 105,166)
1 space for each 3 occupants based on maximum design capacity as determined by the fire codes (Lansing, N.Y., pop. 10,521)
1 space per 100 square feet floor area gross (including all aboveground and below ground floors) (Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276,093)
1 parking space per 200 square feet of exercise area (Frisco, Tex., pop. 33,714)
1 per 300 square feet of floor space (Arlington, Mass., pop. 42,389)
1 per 150 square feet of gross floor area (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531; Las Cruces, N. Mex., pop. 74,267)
1 space 200 square feet (Lenexa, Kan., pop. 40,238)
5 per 1,000 square feet (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
10 per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area (Jefferson County, Col., pop. 527,056)
Hotels
The maximum required shall be as follows: 1 space for each guest room without kitchen facilities and 1.5 spaces for each guest room with kitchen facilities, plus 1 space per each 100 square feet of banquet, assembly, meeting, or restaurant seating area. The decision-making body may require less than the maximum requirement based on factors including, but not limited to, the size of the project, the range of services offered, and the location. (Redondo Beach, Calif., pop. 63,261)
For the first 40,000 square feet of floor area, 20 off-street parking spaces for every 1,000 square feet. 10 off-street parking spaces shall be provided and maintained by the hotel or motel for each additional 1,000 square feet up to 100,000 square feet of floor area. Furthermore, 5 off-street parking spaces shall be provided for ever 1,000 square feet over 100,000 square feet of space used. Additionally, at least 1 permanently maintained off-street parking space shall be provided for every 300 square feet of floor area used for administrative offices. Convention facilities, dressing rooms, employee lounges and locker rooms, kitchen areas, stage and backstage areas, and all similar areas not open to the public and not excluded in this subsection shall provide at least 1 permanently maintained parking space for every 1,000 square feet of floor area. (Mesquite, Nev., pop. 9,389)
0.7 spaces per accommodation unit, plus 1 space per 330 square feet (Vail, Colo., pop. 4,531)
1 for each sleeping room, plus 1 for each 400 square feet of meeting area and restaurant space (Arlington, Mass., pop. 42,389)
1 space per room or lodging unit (Eugene, Ore., pop. 137,893; Gresham, Ore., pop. 90,205; Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276,093; Tampa, Fla., pop. 303,447)
1 space per guestroom, plus the applicable requirement for eating and drinking, banquet, assembly, commercial or other as required for such use, less 75% of the spaces required for guestrooms (Palo Alto, Calif., pop. 58,598)
1 space per room, plus 1 space per 20 rooms (to accommodate motel per hotel staff), plus 75% of the normal spaces required for accessory uses (e.g. banquet rooms, meeting rooms, restaurants, etc.) if applicable (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531)
1 parking space shall be provided for each guest or sleeping room or suite, plus 1 additional space for each employee (Gurnee, Ill., pop. 28,834)
1.2 parking spaces shall be provided for each sleeping room for hotels, apartment hotels and motels. In addition to sleeping rooms, if there are other accessory uses provided therein, additional, off-street parking shall be provided for those accessory uses at the rate of 40% of the requirements for such uses as provided in other subsections hereof. (Boca, Raton, Fla., pop. 74,764)
1.25 for each rentable room or suite, plus 10 for each 100 square feet of conference, banquet or restaurant area (Lansing, N.Y., pop. 10,521)
1.25 per room for first 50 rooms, plus 1 per room for each additional room; other uses within hotel per motel at standard rates (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
Bed-and-Breakfast Inn
1 per guest room (Brunswick County, N.C., pop. 73,143; Ithaca, N.Y., pop. 29,287)
1 space per bed-and-breakfast guest unit, plus required parking spaces for resident family and 1 per employee (Yavapai County, Ariz., pop. 167,517)
1 space per guest room, plus 2 parking spaces per dwelling unit (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531)
2 parking spaces for the primary dwelling unit, plus 1 space for each additional habitable unit, plus 1 parking space for each 2 seats in the dining area in excess of 2 seats per habitable unit (Duluth, Minn., pop. 86,918)
2 for every dwelling, plus 1 for every guest room (Cincinnati, Ohio, pop. 331,285)
2 spaces per permanent resident family, plus 1 space per guest room (Big Rapids, Mich., pop. 10,849)
3 spaces for the principal dwelling, plus 1 space per rented room (Cookeville, Tenn., pop. 23,923)
Hospitals
In excess of 10,000 square feet of floor area, 1 per each 200 square feet of floor area or 1.35 per bed (Eugene, Ore., pop. 137,893)
1 space for every 2 beds (Raleigh, N.C., pop. 276,093)
1 space for every 2 beds for patients, plus 1 space for each staff doctor or nurse, plus 1 parking space for each employee on the maximum shift (Boca Raton, Fla., pop. 74,764)
1 per bed (Tampa, Fla., pop. 303,447)
1 space per bed for first 100 beds; 1 space per 2 beds for next 100 beds; 1 space per 4 beds thereafter (Columbia, Mo., pop. 84,531)
1 parking space shall be provided for each 2 beds, plus 2 spaces for each 3 employees (Gurnee, Ill., pop. 28,834)
1.5 spaces per bed, plus 1 space per employee (Lenexa, Kans., pop. 40,238)
2 spaces per bed, plus outpatient medical clinic and outpatient medical offices, if any (Aventura, Mass., pop. 25,267)
2.25 per bed at design capacity (Arlington, Mass., pop. 42,389)
3 per bed (Hickory, N.C., pop. 37,222)
Certain plants are more suited than others to provide benefits under various landscape conditions. The recommended plant lists below provide a range of plants suitable for various plantings; they are not inclusive of all the better plants but are representative of them.
A. 
Acceptable street trees.
Alder, Black (Alnus glutinosa)
Alder, Speckled (Alnus rugosa)
Birch, River (Betula nigra), especially Heritage
Cherry, Sargent (Prunus sargentii)
Chokecherry, Schubert (Prunus virginiana "Schubertii")
Corktree, Amur (Phellodendron amurense)
Corktree, Sakhalin (Phellodendron sakhalinense)
Dogwood, Kousa (Cornus kousa)
Dogwood, Corneliancherry (Corrus mas)
Elm, Chinese (Ulmus parvifolia, NOT Siberian elm)
Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), male clones only
Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), esp. Chicago-land, Prairie Pride, and Windy City
Honeylocust, Thornless Common (Gleditsia triacanthos inermis), many cultivars available; vastly overused; would discourage continued planting
Hornbeam, American (Carpinus caroliniana)
Hornbeam, European (Carpinus betulus)
Hophornbeam, American (Ostrya virginiana)
Katsuratree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum)
Linden, Crimean (Tilia X euchlora), esp. Redmond
Linden, Littleleaf (Tilia cordata), esp. Glenleven, Greenspire, and June Bride
Linden, Silver (Tilia tomentosa)
Maple, Hedge (Acer campestre)
Maple, Paperbark (Acer griseum)
Maple, Three-flower (Acer triflorum)
Maple, Miyabe (Acer miyabei)
Maple, Norway (Acer platanoides), esp. Cleveland, Emerald Queen, Schwedler, Summershade, and Superform. May be too big for many areas; too shady, often preventing lawn growth.
Maple, Red (Acer rubrum), esp. Autumn Blaze, Marmo, Morgan, Northwood, October Glory, and Red Sunset
Maple, Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus)
Maple, Tartarian (Acer tataricum)
Maple, Purpleblow (Acer truncatum)
Oak, Bur (Quercus macrocarpa)
Oak, English (Quercus robur)
Oak, Red (Quercus rubra or Q. borealis)
Pear, Callery (Pyrus calleryana), esp. Chanticleer and Fauriei (cultivars such as Brad ford and Aristocrat are proving to be landscape liabilities as they age beyond 15 years)
B. 
Unacceptable street trees. The following are landscape liabilities because of high susceptibility of pests or disease; invasive root systems; casting deep shade; dangerous thorns; troublesome seeds, fruits, or cones; or weak-wooded, leading to hazardous twig and limb breakage.
Ash (Fraxinus species)
Birches (Betula species), except river birch (B. nigra)
Boxelder (Acer negundo)
Buckeyes (Aesculus species)
Buckthorn (Rhamnus species)
Catalpa (Catalpa species)
Cone-bearing trees, including pines, spruces, firs, larches
Crabapples, except for non-fruiting varieties
Elms (Ulmus species), except Chinese elm (U. parvifolia)
Fruit trees, including apple, cherry, peach, pear, plum
Ginkgo (Ginkgo species), female only
Hawthorns (Crataegus species)
Hickories (Carya species)
Horsechestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)
Kentucky coffeetree (Gymocladus dioicus)
Locust, Black (Robinia pseudoacacia)
Maple, Silver (Acer saccharunum)
Mulberries (Morus species)
Mountainashes (Sorbus species)
Osage-orange (Maclura pomifera)
Poplars (Populus species), including aspens and cottonwoods
Russian-olive (Eleagnus augustifolia)
Sycamore, or Planetree (Platanus species)
Tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima)
Walnut, Black (Juglars nigra)
Willows (Salix species)
The above-listed plants shall not be planted within parkways, medians, or other passageways. Such approval will be contingent upon an agreement that the developer/owner will accept all obligations for maintenance, liability, and removal if such is deemed necessary.
C. 
Acceptable street trees to be planted under power lines.
Maple, Trident (Acer buergeranum)
Maple, Amur (Acer tataricum subsp. ginnala)
Maple, Tatarian (Acer tataricum)
D. 
Plants well-suited for parking islands and median strip planting. These plants are characterized by variable tolerance to sun, heat, drought, and pollution. In addition, they possess relatively restricted root systems, few litter problems, and have aesthetically pleasing habit.
1. 
Trees:
Crabapple, Japanese (Malus floribunda)
Crabapple, Siberian (Malus baccata)
Corktree, Amur (Phellodendron amurense)
Dogwood, Corneliancherry (Cornus mas)
Elm, Chinese (Ulmus parvifolia; NOT Siberian)
Hackberry, Common (Celtis occidentalis)
Hawthorn, Thornless Corkspur (Crataegus crusgalli inermis)
Honeylocust, Thornless (Gleditsia triacanthos inermis)
Lilac, Japanese Tree (Syringa reticulata)
Linden, Littleleaf (Tilia cordata)
Linden, Redmond (Tilia Americana "Redmond")
Linden, Silver (Tilia tomentosa)
Maple, Amur (Acer ginnala)
Maple, Hedge (Acer campestre)
Oak, Bur (Quercus macrocarpa)
Oak, Chestnut (Quercus prinus)
Pear, Callery (Pyrus calleryana)
Pine, Jack (Pinus banksiana)
Redcedar, Eastern (Juniperus virginiana)
Spruce, Black Hills (Picea glauca "Bensata")
Spruce, Colorado (green or blue; Picea pungens)
2. 
Shrubs:
Autumn-olive, Cardinal (Eleagnus umbellata "Cardinal")
Bayberry, Northern (Myrica pennsylvanica)
Barberry, Japanese (Berberis thunbergii)
Cinquefoil (Potentilla species)
Coralberry, Hancock (Symphoricarpos X chenaultii "Hancock")
Currant, Alpine (Ribes alpinum)
Falsespirea, Ural (Sorbaria sorbifolia)
Forsythia, Border (Forsythia X intermedia)
Junipers (Juniperus species)
Peashrub, Siberian (Caragana arborescens)
Plum, Beach (Prunus maritima)
Privet, Regel (Ligustrum obtusifolium regelianum)
Quince, Flowering (Chaenomeles speciosa)
Rose, Rugosa (hedge; Rosa rugosa)
Rose, Virginia (Rosa virginiana)
Spirea, Goldflame (Spirea X bumalda "Goldflame")
Sumacs (Rhus species)
Viburnum, Arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum)
Viburnum, Black Haw (Viburnum prunifolia)
Yucca, Adam's needle (Yucca filamentosa)
3. 
Vines and ground covers:
Juniper, Sargent Chinese (Juniperus chinensis sargentii)
Cinquefoil, Longacre (Potentilla fruticosa "Longacre")
Sumac, Gro-Low Fragrant (Rhus aromatica "Gro-low")
Fleeceflower, Japanese (Polygonum cuspidatum compactum)
Englemann ivy (Parthenocissus quinquefolia engelmannii)
E. 
Plants well-suited for berms (Mounds).
1. 
Trees:
Crabapple, Sargent (Malus sargentii)
Crabapple, Japanese (Malus floribunda)
Fir, White (concolor; Abies concolor)
Hawthorn, Thornless Corkspur (Crataegus crusgalli inermis)
Linden, Silver (Tilia tomentosa)
Maple, Amur (Acer ginnala)
Maple, Hedge (Acer campestre)
Oak, Bur (Quercus macrocarpa)
Pine, Mugo (Pinus mugo)
Pine, Jack (Pinus banksiana)
Pine, Red (Pinus resinosa)
Pine, Scotch (Pinus sylvestris)
Redcedar, Eastern (Juniperus virginiana)
Spruce, Colorado (green or blue; Picea pungens)
Yellowwood (Cladrastis lutea)
2. 
Shrubs:
Barberry, Japanese (Berberis thunbergii)
Currant, Alpine (Ribes alpinum)
Dogwood, Gray (Cornus racemosa)
Junipers (Juniperus species)
Peashrub, Siberian (Caragana arborescens)
Cinquefoil (Potentilla species)
Privet, Regel (Ligustrum obtusifolium regelianum)
Rose, Rugosa (hedge; Rosa rugosa)
Smokebush, Common (Cotinus coggygria)
Sumacs (Rhus species)
F. 
Plants well-suited for detention ponds.
1. 
In water up to six feet deep.
Yellow lotus (yellow water lily; Nuphar species)
2. 
In water two - three feet deep.
White water lily (Nymphaea odorata)
Pickerelweed (Pontaderia cordata)
Arrowhead (Sagittaria latifolia)
3. 
At the water's edge.
a. 
Herbaceous plants:
Sweet flag (Acorus calamus)
Turtlehead (Chelone glabra)
Bulrushes, sages, rushes
Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)
Marsh marigola (Caltha palustris)
b. 
Trees and shrubs:
Speckle alder (Alnus rugosa)
Black alder (Alrus glutinosa)
Willows (Salix species)
4. 
Above the water's edge.
a. 
Herbaceous plants:
Daylilies (Hemerocallis species)
Purple cornflower (Echinacea purpurea)
Marsh milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)
b. 
Trees and shrubs:
Speckled alder (Alnus rugosa)
Serviceberry (Amelanchier leaves)
Pagoda dogwood (Cornus alternifolia)
Silly dogwood (Cornus amomum)
Redosier dogwood (Cornus sericea or Cornus stolonifera)
American hazelnut (Corylus americana)
Tamarack (Larix laricina)
European larch (Larix decidua)
Swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor)
Red maple (Acer rubrum)
Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)
Black alder (Alnus glutinosa)
Willows (Salix species)
Indigobush (Amorpha fruticosa)
Black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa)
Purple-fruited chokeberry (Aronia prunifolia)
Pasture rose (Rosa carolina)
Elderberry (Sambucus species)
Arrowwood viburnum (Viburnum dentatum)
American bladdernut (Staphylea trifolia)
Nannyberry viburnum (Viburnum lentago)
Blackhaw (Viburnum prunifolium)
G. 
Trees with high salt-tolerance. Among the following trees, some (indicated with an asterisk) are considered to be undesirable for street tree planting. Such undesirable trees, however, have the good fortune to survive all sorts of adverse environmental conditions. They often thrive with little or no maintenance. These trees can be useful in vacant lots, industrial areas, leftover bits of land. Their lack of aesthetic appeal is more than balanced by their ability to bring some measure of green relief to an otherwise ugly and barren landscape.
Cherry, black (Prunus serotina)*
Hickory, shagbark (Carya ovata)*
Honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos)
Larches (Larix species)
Locust, black (Robinia pseudoacacia)*
Maple, Norway (Acer platanoides)
Maple, silver (Acer saccharinum)*
Oak, bur (Quercus macrocarpa)
Oak, English (Quercus robur)
Oak, Red (Quercus rubra)
Pine, Austrian (Pinus nigra)
Pine, jack (Pinus banksiana)*
Pine, mugo (Pinus mugo)
Pine, Scotch (Pinus sylvestris)
Poplars (Populus species)*
Redcedar, eastern (Juniperus virginiana)*
Serviceberry (Amelanchier species)
Spruce, Colorado (Picea puncens)
Sumac, staghorn (Rhus typhina)*
Sycamore maple (Not sycamore; Acer pseudoplatanus)
Tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima)*
Willows (Salix species)*
The following shall govern the furnishing and planting of parkway trees:
A. 
Location of planting sites. All plantings will be made on City parkways at various addresses or block/lot numbers. Contractors are responsible for all JULIE locates. The City will stake or mark the curbing or sidewalk for the location of the new plantings. All trees must be centered in the parkway at that point unless otherwise directed. Planting will be done in the Spring and Fall only.
B. 
Communication. The contractor must notify the City's Engineering and Building Department before commencing work. Failure to do so will result in a stop-work order.
C. 
Tagging of trees. The City reserves the right to tag all trees before digging. Trees should not be transplanted from a distance greater than 50 miles from the City of Crystal Lake. The City shall not be required to accept any delivered trees, which in the opinion of the Director of Public Works or his authorized representatives do not meet specifications.
D. 
Final acceptance of trees. Approval of trees during tagging shall not be construed as final acceptance. The City reserves the right to additionally reject trees at the final planting site under the following conditions:
1. 
If tagged trees are missing the actual tags that were placed by the City.
2. 
If the trees are found to be injured or in poor condition (including dry or cracked root balls).
3. 
If, after the ball wrapping materials are unwrapped from the top of the root ball, the root flare (the point where the roots flare out from the trunk) is deeper than two inches from existing grade.
In each case, the City shall not be financially liable in any way for rejected trees, even if they have already been planted.
E. 
Leaning trees. All Contractors will guarantee that the new planting will remain plumb for two years after planting, or they are required to return and straighten and stake the tree as necessary. The guide wires must have appropriate warning flags.
F. 
Guarantee. Trees furnished are to include planting and a minimum two-year warranty. All trees that die or fail to grow adequately in the opinion of the City Staff within two years after planting must be replaced the same or the following planting season. The replacement tree shall also be covered by a successive two-year guarantee. Total contract amount shall be retained by the City in the form of bond until the end of the guarantee period, for purposes of insuring performance during the guarantee period.
G. 
Specifications for parkway trees.
1. 
All trees shall have a diameter of 2 1/2 inches or greater, measured at a point six inches above the root flare.
2. 
All trees must be nursery grown within a radius of 50 miles of the City of Crystal Lake, Illinois.
3. 
All trees shall have straight trunks and be uniformly shaped with good full branching and well-developed root systems. All trees shall be free from insects and disease, broken branches and bark scrapes. All shade trees must have one dominant leader split or secondary leaders are not allowed.
4. 
All tree roots shall be balled and burlapped with a minimum ball size of 24 inches diameter. Balls shall be intact at the time of planting.
5. 
Trees shall be true to name as specified.
6. 
Trees shall be freshly dug. No heeled-in plants or plants from cold storage will be accepted.
H. 
Transportation and handling.
1. 
The Contractor will transport the trees to the planting sites. All trees will be covered during transport to reduce water loss through transpiration.
2. 
Planting material shall be handled in a manner as to cause the least amount of damage during the planting process.
3. 
Balled and burlapped plants shall always be handled by the soil ball. Plants shall not under any circumstance be dragged, lifted or pulled by the trunk or foliage parts in a manner that will loosen the roots in the ball.
4. 
On the job site, plants should be handled, secured or covered so as to prevent damage from wind and vibration. Plants shall never be thrown or bounced off a truck or loader to the ground.
5. 
Plant material shall be planted the day it is taken to planting site, or it shall be watered and/or covered and placed in a shady area to prevent drying out or freezing.
I. 
Digging planting hole.
1. 
All planting holes shall be dug circular in outline.
2. 
Depth of holes shall be such that the bottom of the root ball will be placed on undisturbed subgrade, and the root flare shall be at or one inch above the grade of the surrounding soil.
3. 
Width of holes at the soil surface shall be twice the diameter of the root ball, with sides sloping inward towards the bottom of the root ball (see planting detail).
4. 
Excavated plant pit that will be left open when work is not in progress or pose an immediate and considerable hazard to traffic shall be adequately barricaded with qualified warning devices. No planting pit may remain open in excess of 24 hours.
J. 
Placement of tree/unwrapping ball.
1. 
The tree shall be placed plumb in the center of the hole.
2. 
All ropes, strings, nails and burlap wrapping shall be removed from the upper one-third of the root ball after the tree has been placed in the hole.
K. 
Backfilling/watering/pruning.
1. 
In most instances, the backfill around the ball shall be the same soil that was removed from the hole. However, in cases where excessive clay, rocks, stones, etc. are encountered, topsoil shall be used.
2. 
A shallow "saucer" of soil, approximately three inches to four inches high shall be formed just inside the edge of each planting hole to serve as a water reservoir.
3. 
Any excess soil or debris shall be removed from the planting site immediately upon completion of planting each individual tree.
4. 
When approximately two-thirds of the planting pit has been backfilled, the hole shall be watered so as to settle the soil around all of the roots. After the water has been absorbed, the planting pit shall be filled with the planting soil, tamped lightly to grade, and watered thoroughly again, any further settlement shall be brought to grade with additional planting soil. Contractor shall supply all watering equipment. Trees planted in an empty lot or retention pond must be watered by Contractor for at least one year.
5. 
Initial pruning shall be corrective only and done by the contractor at the time of planting.
L. 
Approved species.
1. 
Average City blocks shall have no more than 33% of any one species of tree. The planting of one species exclusively is not allowed because of the possibility of an epidemic.
2. 
Approved species list is included in Appendix Section A-1000.
3. 
No ash or elm species shall be planted in City parkways until further notice.
M. 
Inspection. City staff shall inspect plantings on the day of plant material installation, one year after planting and at two years after planting.
[Amended 3-1-2016 by Ord. No. 7200]
The boundaries of the Downtown District are delineated below. This delineation does not imply that properties within this district are zoned B-4 Downtown Business. Rather, it indicated properties where provisions pertaining to the Downtown District are applicable.
650 A-1300.tif
A. 
Criteria for required park and recreation land dedication.
1. 
Requirement and population ratio. The ultimate density of a proposed development shall bear directly upon the amount of land required for dedication. The total requirement shall be one acre of land per 100 of ultimate population in accordance with the following classifications:
Types of Recreation Area
Size Range Per 100 People
Minimum Acres
Play lots
Minimum 8,000 square feet
N/A
Elementary school/park
10 acres - minimum combination
1.0
Neighborhood park
10 acres - minimum
1.0
District or area park
15 acres - minimum
1.0
2. 
Location. The Official Map of the City of Crystal Lake and/or the Master Plan for Parks and Recreation for the Crystal Lake Park District as adopted by the Crystal Lake Park District shall be used as a guideline in locating sites. A central location which will serve equally the entire development is most desirable. In large developments these sites can be located throughout the development according to established standards for park area distances.
3. 
In the event the City should determine that a cash contribution shall be made by the subdivider or developer in lieu of land dedication, the City shall apply the population ratio of an acre of land for 100 ultimate population within the development or area to be subdivided times the fair market value.
B. 
Criteria for requiring school site dedication.
1. 
Requirement and population ratio. The ultimate number of students to be generated by the subdivision or planned unit development shall be used as a basis to determine the amount of land required or cash value thereof for school developer donations. The amount of land required shall be determined by obtaining the ratio of estimated children to be served in each such school classification over the maximum recommended number of students to be served in each such school classification as stated herein, and then applying such ratio to the said minimum recommended number of acres for a school site of each such school classification as stated herein. The product thereof shall be the acres of land deemed needed to have sufficient land for school sites to serve the estimated increase of children in each such school classification.
2. 
School classifications and size of school site. School classifications and size of school sites within the City shall be determined in accordance with the following criteria:
School Classification by Grades
Maximum No. of Students of Each Such School Classification
Minimum No. of Acres of Land for Each School Site of such Classification
(acres)
Elementary schools Kindergarten - 6th
600 students
11
Junior high schools 7th - 8th
900 students
19
High schools 9th - 12th
2,000 students
50
3. 
Location. The Official Map of the City, the Comprehensive School Plan and/or the standards adopted by the affected school district shall be used as a guideline in locating sites. Each subdivider or his/her agent shall obtain a statement in writing for each school district affected by the development recommending the exact size and location of each parcel to be used for school sites and submit a copy thereof to the City prior to consideration and approval of such by the Mayor and City Council.
C. 
Criteria for requiring a contribution in lieu of park and school sites. When the available land is inappropriate for park and recreational purposes or for a school site, the City shall require the subdivider or developer to pay a cash contribution in lieu of the land dedication required or shall require the developer to make a contribution or dedication of a combination of land and cash in lieu of land, upon the election of the City. The cash contributions in lieu of park and recreation land dedication shall be held in trust by the City, or other public body designated by the City, solely for the acquisition and development of park and recreation land as hereinbefore classified, which will be available to serve the immediate or future needs of the residents of that subdivision or development or for the improvement of other existing local park and recreation land which already serves such needs. The City shall determine the uses and purposes for which the cash contribution in lieu of park sites was deposited with the City. The cash contributions in lieu of school sites shall be held in trust by the City or other public body designated by the City, solely for use in the acquisition and development of land for a school site to serve the immediate or future needs of children from that subdivision or development or improvement to any existing school site which already serves such needs.
1. 
Fair market value. The cash contribution in lieu of land shall be based on the "fair market value" of the acres of land in the area improved as specified herein, that otherwise should have been dedicated as park and recreation and school sites. It has been determined that the present fair market value of such improved land in the planning jurisdiction of the City is $135,000 per acre, and such figure shall be used in making any calculation herein unless the subdivider or developer files a written objection thereto. In the event of any such objection the developer shall submit an appraisal showing the fair market value of such improved land in the area of his/her development or other evidence thereof and final determination of said fair market value per acre of such improved land shall be made by the City Council based upon such information submitted by the subdivider or developer and from other sources which may be submitted to the City Council.
2. 
Criteria for requiring dedication and a fee. There will be situations in subdivision or planned unit developments when a combination of land dedication and a contribution in lieu of land are both necessary. These occasions will arise when:
a. 
Only a portion of the land to be developed is proposed as the location for a park or school site. That portion of the land within the subdivision falling within the park or school location shall be dedicated as a site as aforesaid, and a cash contribution in lieu thereof shall be required for any additional land that would have been required to be dedicated.
b. 
A major part of the local park or recreation site or school site has already been acquired and only a small portion of land is needed from the development to complete the site. The remaining portions shall be required by dedication, and a cash contribution in lieu thereof shall be required.
D. 
Density formula.
1. 
The current table of the estimated ultimate tabulation per dwelling unit of population density is generally indicative of current and short-range projected trends in family size for new construction and shall be used in calculating the amount of required acres of land for park sites as well as the amount of acres of land to be used in determining the credit to be given the developer in determining the amount of the school contribution and shall be the basis for determination of any combination of land dedication and cash contribution unless a written objection is filed thereto by a subdivider or developer. For purposes of this subsection the current table shall mean the most recent table of estimated ultimate tabulation per dwelling unit published by the Illinois School Consulting Service as applied simultaneously with the request for approval of the final plat of subdivision or planned unit development pursuant to the ordinance of the City.
2. 
In the event a subdivider or developer files a written objection to the Table of Estimated Ultimate Population listed herein, he/she shall submit his/her own demographic study showing the estimated additional population to be generated from the subdivision or planned unit development and in that event final determination of the formula to be used in such calculations shall be made by the City Council based upon such demographic information submitted by the subdivider or developer and from other sources which may be submitted to the City Council by the park district, school district, or others. It is recognized that population density, age distribution and local conditions change over the years, and the specific formula for the dedication of land, or payment of fees in lieu thereof as stated herein is subject to periodic review and amendment if necessary.
E. 
Criteria for requiring a contribution for parks/recreational uses. The schedule of contributions shall be required as follows:
Based on one acre per 100 people $135,000 = fair market value of one acre.
Type of Unit
Estimated Population
(per dwelling)
Amount Due
Detached single-family
2-bedroom
2.017
$2,723
3-bedroom
2.899
$3,914
3-/4-bedroom
3.331
$4,497
4-bedroom
3.764
$5,081
5-bedroom
3.77
$5,090
Attached single-family
1-bedroom
1.193
$1,611
2-bedroom
1.99
$2,687
2-/3-bedroom
2.191
$2,958
3-bedroom
2.392
$3,229
4-bedroom
3.145
$4,246
Apartments
Efficiency
1.294
$1,747
1-bedroom
1.758
$2,373
1-/2-bedroom
1.836
$2,479
2-bedroom
1.914
$2,584
2-/3-bedroom
2.484
$3,353
3-bedroom
3.053
$4,122
F. 
Criteria for requiring a contribution to schools.
1. 
The City has determined through the application of the formula developed in the City fiscal impact study that the following schedule of contributions shall be required as follows:
a. 
Two-bedroom apartment: $17 per unit.
b. 
Three-bedroom apartment: $1,252 per unit.
c. 
Two-bedroom condo: $17 per unit.
d. 
Three-bedroom condo: $1,252 per unit.
e. 
Two-bedroom townhouse: $17 per unit.
f. 
Three-bedroom townhouse: $1,252 per unit.
g. 
Four-bedroom townhouse: $6,150 per unit.
h. 
Three-bedroom single-family: $6,192 per unit.
i. 
Four-bedroom single-family: $10,969 per unit.
j. 
Five-bedroom single-family: $5,307 per unit.
2. 
The contributions required for schools shall be reduced by the value of the land accepted for school sites which shall be determined in accordance with provisions in this Appendix section. The total cash contribution shall be paid in accordance with provisions of this Appendix section. It is recognized that local conditions change over the years and the cash contribution required for school is subject to the periodic review and amendments, as necessary.
G. 
Reservation of additional land. Where the Comprehensive Plan or the standards of the City call for a larger amount of park and recreational land in a particular subdivision or planned unit development than the developer is required to dedicate, the land needed beyond the developer's contribution shall be reserved for subsequent purchase by the City or other public body designated by the City, provided that such acquisition is made within one year from the date of approval of the final plat.
H. 
Combining with adjoining developments. Where the subdivision or planned unit development is less than 40 acres, public open space or a school site which is to be dedicated should, where possible, be combined with dedications from adjoining developments in order to produce usable recreation areas or school sites without hardship on a particular developer.
I. 
Topography and grading. The slope, topography and geology of the dedicated site as well as its surroundings must be suitable for its intended purposes. Grading on sites dedicated for park and recreational uses shall not differ greatly from surrounding land.
J. 
Improved sites. All sites shall be dedicated in a condition ready for full service of electrical, water, sewer and streets (including enclosed drainage and curb and gutter) as applicable to the location of the site, or acceptable provision made therefor. The sidewalks and trees normally included within the definition of improved sites may be deferred due to the delay time between dedication of any such school site and construction of school facilities thereon.
K. 
For those residential developments that have already received final plat of subdivision or final planned unit development approval prior to April 26, 2005, the school and park fees would remain the same during the course of the time line of their respective growth management schedules. After the terms of the growth management schedule have elapsed, the fees charged shall be those in effect at the time a permit is applied for. In every other case, the school and park fees shall increase 60 days after April 26, 2005. Where an existing dwelling is replaced with a new dwelling with the same number of bedrooms as the prior dwelling and for existing vacant lots platted prior to 1982, no contribution shall be required.
A. 
Rescue capital facilities fees.
1. 
In the subdividing of any land within the City or within 1 1/2 miles of the corporate limits, as a condition of the approval of a final plat of subdivision or a final plat for a planned unit development, each subdivider or developer shall be required to pay a fire/rescue capital facility fee in accordance with the table of fees listed below:
Unit Type
Library
Police and/or Administration
Fire/Rescue
Total
1-bedroom apartment
$132
$132
$561
$825
2-bedroom apartment
$187
$186
$515
$888
3-bedroom apartment
$271
$223
$682
$1,176
1- or 2-bedroom condominium
$187
$186
$515
$888
3-bedroom condominium
$244
$234
$538
$1,016
2-bedroom townhouse
$160
$178
$574
$912
3-bedroom townhouse
$244
$234
$538
$1,016
2- or 3-bedroom single-family
$244
$255
$662
$1,161
4-bedroom single-family
$288
$315
$766
$1,369
5-bedroom single-family
$319
$334
$737
$1,390
2. 
All such fees for land within the City shall be paid in accordance with § 241-20. All such fees for land outside the City limits but within 1 1/2 miles of the City limits or within the City's planning jurisdiction as established by the Illinois Compiled Statutes shall be paid upon final plat approval by the City, provided that subdividers or developers may, as a condition of and prior to final plat approval by the City.
3. 
For those residential developments that have already received final plat of subdivision or final planned unit development approval prior to April 26, 2005, the fire/rescue capital facility fees would remain the same during the course of the time line of their respective growth management schedules. After the terms of the growth management schedule have elapsed, the fees charged shall be those in effect at the time a permit is applied for. In every other case, the fire/rescue capital facility fees shall increase 60 days after April 26, 2005. Where an existing dwelling is replaced with a new dwelling with the same number of bedrooms as the prior dwelling and for existing vacant lots platted prior to 1982, no contribution shall be required.
A. 
General. All proposed plats submitted for approval under the provisions of the UDO shall allocate sufficient easement areas for features including, but not limited to, stormwater management facilities, public utilities, tree preservation, environmental conservation, pedestrian/vehicular access, landscaping, municipal facilities and wetland/wetland buffers, wherever necessary.
1. 
All easements and corresponding utility location plans shall be approved prior to the approval of the plat.
2. 
For features required to be in an easement but not required to be within common area, maintenance shall generally be the responsibility of the lot owner, except as expressly provided otherwise in this Unified Development Ordinance or in the development approval.
3. 
A grant of authority to the City to enter upon an easement for purposes of inspection, maintenance and/or repair of a feature within the easement shall not be construed as relieving the owner or owners of such responsibility.
B. 
Recording of easements. All necessary easements and easement provisions shall be clearly identified on final plats and shall be recorded with the McHenry County Recorder's Office as a condition of approval prior to permit issuance.
C. 
Existing easements. All proposed plats shall clearly identify any existing easements on the property, including dimensions, bearings, and recorded instrument numbers.
D. 
Easement types. Unless specifically defined on an approved plat or by condition of plat approval, the following requirements shall apply to these easements:
1. 
Municipal utility easement (MUE).
a. 
Shall be required for any publicly owned and maintained sanitary sewer, water, and/or storm sewer facilities, including all fire hydrants and associated fire service lines.
b. 
Grants the City exclusive access for installation, maintenance, repair, or removal of sanitary sewer, water, and/or storm sewer facilities together with the right to cut, trim, or remove trees, bushes, and roots as may be reasonably required to maintain or access such facilities.
c. 
Shall prohibit encroachment by other utilities, unless such encroachment is approved by the Director of Public Works (or designee) in conjunction with the preliminary plat or consists of a perpendicular crossings of the municipal utility easement. Upon written permission from the Director of Public Works (or designee), encroachments may be permitted after the recording of the final plat.
d. 
Shall prohibit the location of structures and substantial landscaping, including, but not limited to, buildings, fences, retaining walls, signs, posts, trees, shrubbery and light fixtures within the easement.
e. 
Shall prohibit grading activity within the easement without written permission from the City Engineer (or designee).
f. 
Allows the placement of driveways and/or parking within the easement. However, the grade of the property on and adjacent to the easement shall not be altered in any manner so as to interfere with the proper operation and maintenance thereof, or with the surface drainage thereon.
g. 
Shall be exclusive of any other blanket easement on the property.
h. 
Shall be at least 20 feet in width if the easement is not immediately accessible from a public right-of-way. Municipal utility easements that are immediately adjacent to a public right-of-way may be reduced to 15 feet in width with the approval of the Director of Public Works (or designee).
i. 
Shall provide that the owner of the lot, property owners association or other party accepting title to all or any part of the easement is responsible for the maintenance of the surface of that portion of the easement which is located on such party's property. Maintenance shall include, but shall not be limited to, the regular seeding, watering and mowing of all lawns.
j. 
Shall provide that the owner of the lot, property owners association or other party accepting title to all or any part of the easement are completely responsible for landscape and/or paving restoration, should maintenance of the utility be required.
k. 
A recorded municipal utility maintenance agreement (MUMA) is required between the property owner and the City. A standard form can be provided to the developer upon request to the Engineering Division.
2. 
Public utility easement (PUE).
a. 
Shall allow both private and public utility providers access associated with the installation, maintenance, repair, or removal of utility facilities.
b. 
Shall prohibit the location of structures and landscaping (other than grass), including, but not limited to, buildings, retaining walls, signs, posts, trees, shrubbery and light fixtures within the easement.
c. 
Shall allow the location of fences and plant material in the easement, subject to written approval of the applicable utility company and the City Engineer.
3. 
Restricted private utility easement (RPUE).
a. 
Shall be required for any privately owned and maintained drainage system improvements outside a Stormwater Management Easement (including but not limited to storm sewers, drainage structures and pump stations) that serve or benefit more than one individual lot.
b. 
Shall prohibit the location of structures and landscaping (other than grass), including, but not limited to, buildings, fences, retaining walls, signs, posts, trees, shrubbery and light fixtures within the easement.
c. 
Shall provide that the owner of the lot, property owners association or other party accepting title to all or any part of the easement is responsible for maintenance of the utility features within such easement and the surface of such easement so that it is in good and functional condition for its intended purpose. Maintenance shall include, but shall not be limited to, the regular seeding, watering and mowing of all lawns.
d. 
Shall provide that the owner of the lot, property owners association or other party accepting title to all or any part of the easement are completely responsible for landscape and/or paving restoration, should maintenance of the utility be required.
e. 
Shall be enforceable by the Engineering and Building Department on behalf of owners of properties that are adversely affected by conditions within the easement.
f. 
Shall allow the Public Works Department to enter upon the easement for the purpose of maintenance, to charge the costs of such maintenance to the responsible parties, to construct drainage facilities within the easement, and to assume responsibility for the drainage features at its discretion.
g. 
Allows the placement of driveways and/or parking within the easement. However, the grade of the property on and adjacent to the easement shall not be altered in any manner so as to interfere with the proper operation and maintenance thereof, or with the surface drainage thereon.
h. 
Shall be exclusive of any other blanket easement on the property.
i. 
Shall be at least 20 feet in width if the easement is not immediately accessible from a public right-of-way. Restricted private utility easements that are immediately adjacent to a public right-of-way may be reduced to 15 feet in width with the approval of the Director of Public Works (or designee).
4. 
Drainage easement (DE).
a. 
Shall be required for any surface swales or other minor improvements that are intended for maintenance by the lots on which they are located.
b. 
Shall prohibit any alteration within the easement that would hinder or redirect flow.
c. 
Shall prohibit the location of structures and landscaping (other than grass), including, but not limited to, buildings, retaining walls, signs, posts, trees, shrubbery and light fixtures within the easement.
d. 
Shall allow the location of fences in the easement, subject to written approval of the City Engineer.
e. 
Shall provide that the owner of the lot, property owners association or other party accepting title to all or any part of the easement is responsible for maintenance of the drainage features within such easement so that it is in good and functional condition for its intended purpose as a stormwater drainage facility. Maintenance shall include, but shall not be limited to, the regular seeding, watering and mowing of all lawns and removal of all obstructions.
f. 
Shall be enforceable by the Engineering and Building Department on behalf of owners of properties that are adversely affected by conditions within the easement.
g. 
Shall allow the Public Works Department to enter upon the easement for the purpose of maintenance, to charge the costs of such maintenance to the responsible parties, to construct drainage facilities within the easement, and to assume responsibility for the drainage features at its discretion.
5. 
Stormwater management easement (SME).
a. 
Shall provide that the owner of the lot, property owners association or other party accepting title to all or any part of the easement is responsible for maintenance of the stormwater management features (including but not limited to storm sewer pipes and drainage structures) within such easement so that it is in good and functional condition for its intended purpose as a stormwater management facility. Maintenance shall include, but shall not be limited to, the regular seeding, watering and mowing of all lawns, removal of all obstructions and keeping all surface openings of the drainage pipes underlying the easement free of all grass clippings, leaves, or other related or foreign materials.
b. 
Shall prohibit the location of structures and landscaping (other than grass or plantings as shown on the approved landscape plans), including, but not limited to, buildings, fences, retaining walls, signs, posts, trees, shrubbery and light fixtures within the easement. However, the replacement of these allowable landscaping due to damage or removal resulting from repair of the stormwater management facility by the City of Crystal Lake shall be the responsibility of the owner or responsible party.
c. 
Shall prohibit any alteration within the easement that would hinder or redirect flow or change in any way the topography or elevations of the easement.
d. 
Shall be enforceable by the Engineering and Building Department on behalf of owners of properties that are adversely affected by conditions within the easement.
e. 
Shall allow the City, upon five days' notice to the owner or responsible party served by certified mail, to enter upon the easement for the purpose of maintenance and to charge the costs of such maintenance to the responsible parties at its discretion.
f. 
Shall allow the City to enter upon the easement for the purpose of emergency repairs, to charge the costs of such repairs to the responsible parties, to construct drainage facilities within the easement, and to assume temporary responsibility for the drainage features at its discretion.
g. 
The City may, at its sole election, record notice of lien with the Recorder of Deeds for McHenry County as described above against the subject real property for the costs of unpaid maintenance or emergency repairs conducted by the City. Said lien shall include the applicable expense to the homeowner's association plus attorney's fees and court costs. Upon payment of said lien, the City shall issue the appropriate release of lien to the owner or responsible party. It shall not be the obligation of the City to record the release of the lien but shall be the obligation of the party procuring the release.
6. 
Conservancy easement (CE).
a. 
Prohibits any land-disturbing activities, or alteration of any vegetative cover, including mowing, within the easement area.
b. 
Allows the removal of dead and diseased trees that pose a safety risk or impede drainage, only after first obtaining written approval from the Community Development Department. Normal maintenance activities for wetlands or wetland buffers, as outlined in a maintenance plan approved by the City Engineer and in accordance with the Crystal Lake Stormwater Ordinance, are permitted.
[Amended 6-3-2014 by Ord. No. 7034]
c. 
All Conservancy Easements shall be identified with signs located along the boundary of the easement. Signs shall be placed at intervals of no more than 200 feet, and each sign shall be a maximum of 1.5 square feet in area. A minimum of one sign is required, regardless of easement size.
d. 
Conservancy Easements shall be required on the Final Plat for the following environmental features:
(i) 
Excessive slopes: All areas with a slope 2:1 (H:V) or greater.
(ii) 
Riparian buffers: Riparian buffer areas as defined in the Crystal Lake Stormwater Ordinance.
(iii) 
Floodplains: All areas within designated floodways and regulatory floodplains as defined in the Crystal Lake Stormwater Ordinance.
(iv) 
Wetlands: All delineated wetlands and required wetland buffer areas as defined in the Crystal Lake Stormwater Ordinance.
(v) 
Trees and forested areas: All trees required to be preserved by the Section 4-300, Tree preservation.
7. 
Access easement (AE).
a. 
Shall be required for shared, joint or cross access as required by the Access Management Ordinance or to facilitate pedestrian connections between private properties.
b. 
Grants the general public the right to access the easement for purposes of driving, walking, running, bicycling, skating, or utilizing certain classes of non-motorized vehicles.
c. 
Prohibits the placement of any obstruction within the easement that would otherwise prevent the public from accessing this easement.
8. 
Landscape easement (LE).
a. 
Shall be required for landscaping in common areas that is maintained by the property owners association or other responsible party.
b. 
Shall provide that the property owners association or other party accepting title or maintenance obligations to all or any part of the easement is responsible for maintenance of the landscaping as indicated on the plat of subdivision in a manner consistent with the landscape plan approved by the City of Crystal Lake. Maintenance shall include, but shall not be limited to, the watering of plantings and lawns, removal of weeds, leaves or other foreign material and the mowing of lawns.
c. 
No individual lot fences are permitted in the landscape easements.
9. 
Other. Other easements may be required by the City Council to preserve features or functions unique to a given property and shall be defined on the recorded plat.
E. 
Common areas. In addition to easements required by this section, the following environmental features shall be placed within common areas on the plat:
1. 
Riparian buffers.
2. 
Floodways.
3. 
Wetlands and wetland buffers: All delineated wetlands and required wetland buffer areas as defined in the Crystal Lake Stormwater Ordinance.
4. 
Forested areas: All contiguous areas of tree cover totaling one acre or greater that are required to be preserved by Section 4-300, Tree preservation.
5. 
Stormwater management facilities: Engineered and built drainage or water quality treatment improvements, including but not limited to detention and retention facilities, for subdivisions shall be contained within common areas. Such improvements shall be constructed and maintained according to the requirements of the Crystal Lake Stormwater Ordinance.
F. 
Access. All common areas required by this section shall be provided with an access easement that connects the common area with a public right-of-way. The access easement shall be a minimum of 15 feet in width.
Summary of Easements
Easement Type
Width
Typical Maintenance By
Fences Permitted?
Municipal Utility Easement
MUE
Minimum 20 feet
City
No
Public Utility Easement
PUE
Varies
Utility Company
Yes (utility company approval needed)
Restricted Private Utility Easement
RPUE
20 feet
Property Owners' Association
No
Drainage Easement
DE
Varies
Property Owner
Yes (City approval)
Stormwater Management Easement
SME
Varies
Property Owners' Association
No
Conservancy Easement
CE
Varies
Property Owners' Association
Yes (City approval)
Access Easement
AE
Varies (minimum 15 feet)
Property Owner
No
Landscape Easement
LE
Varies
Property Owners' Association
No
650 A-1600-F.tif