Town of Pinedale, WY
Sublette County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Adopted by the Town Council of the Town of Pinedale 10-22-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-424 (Title 18 of the 1983 Municipal Code). Amendments noted where applicable.]
GENERAL REFERENCES
Building and fire construction standards — See Ch. 175.
Construction standards for water lines, sewer lines and streets — See Ch. 180.
Drainage — See Ch. 196.
Solid waste — See Ch. 389.
Streets and sidewalks — See Ch. 395.
Subdivision of land — See Ch. 400.
Water and sewer — See Ch. 460.
Zoning — See Ch. 475.

§ 275-1 Title.

The ordinance codified in this chapter shall be known, cited, and referred to as the "Master Land Use Plan of the Town of Pinedale, Wyoming."

§ 275-2 Introduction.

A. 
Pinedale is the county seat for Sublette County. It is situated on the upper reaches of the Green River Drainage, on the western slope of the Wind River Mountain Range. The Town functions as an educational, commercial, and social center for a large service area of outlying rural communities and ranches.
B. 
The 2005 U.S. Census Bureau population estimate for Pinedale was 1,658 people, which is an approximate population increase of 17% since 2000, and an approximate population increase of 40% since 1990.
C. 
Between 1990 and 2005, Pinedale and the surrounding area have proven popular with retired and semiretired persons wishing to purchase a secondary or amenity-based residence. Since 2000, this trend has been eclipsed by an influx of persons seeking employment in the nearby natural gas fields as well as the service industry. The growth rate between 2000 and 2005 is primarily seen as an effect of nearby natural gas extraction. It is expected that the population growth rate of about 17% every five years will likely continue for the next 10 years as natural gas extraction is expected to continue for that period of time. Another trend to mention is the increase of younger families into the area, which is contributing to the Town becoming more family-oriented. Besides these population and industry trends there is also the growing trend of rural sprawl occurring around Pinedale, where residential and commercial areas are developing at the edges of Town. A significant concentration of people live within five miles of the Town, but are not included in the below population tally. Although they do not live within the Town limits, a portion of these residences are serviced by Town water and sewer services. If these adjacent properties continue to be annexed into Town, Pinedale's population will grow at a faster rate.
D. 
In addition, the seventeen-percent increase between 2000 and 2005 has occurred despite shortages in available housing stock. It is likely that the population could increase at a faster rate if more housing were made available. In this sense, the price of living is tied to population growth. With more growth the cost of living will potentially increase.
E. 
The table below indicates past, present and projected population figures for the Town of Pinedale:
Year
Population
Percent Change
1950
770
1960
965
+25.3%
1970
948
-1.8%
1980
1,066
+12.4%
1990
1,181
+10.8%
2000
1,419
+20.1%
2005
1,658
+16.8%
2010
1,939
+16.9%
2015
2,269
+17%
Data provided by Sublette County Socioeconomics Office

§ 275-3 Characteristics of Pinedale: general.

A. 
Economy.
(1) 
The major industries in Sublette County consist of oil and gas production, tourism, and agriculture. Within Pinedale itself, the leading employers are the natural gas industry, schools and child care facilities, along with federal, state and county governmental agencies. Tourism, hunting, fishing, and seasonal recreational activities are also important economic factors, and have been a major source of income for the Town and the surrounding area. Even though the natural gas industry has recently overshadowed tourism as the driving economic force in the area, the recreation and tourism industry continues to flourish.
(2) 
Natural gas extraction is currently concentrated in the Jonah Field (in southern Sublette County) and the Pinedale Anticline (which lies just southwest of the Town limits). The Pinedale office of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administrates both fields. The BLM expects development activity to continue in the Jonah Field until approximately 2015 and in the Pinedale Anticline until approximately 2020.
(3) 
The main economic thrust associated with the natural gas fields is expected to dissipate as the labor-intensive development phase of activity tapers off between 2015 and 2020. Many workers who moved to Pinedale for jobs in the development phases of natural gas extraction can be expected to leave the area during this time. However, a smaller level of economic activity in the form of employment, sales taxes, and royalty payments from the natural gas fields will continue as the fields continue to produce natural gas until approximately 2050. Eventually when the natural gas boom passes, it is anticipated that the leading industry in the area will once again be recreation and tourism.
Data provided by Sublette County Socioeconomics Office
B. 
Climate conditions. Sublette County is composed of high desert step, river bottoms and forested mountain ranges. Pinedale's elevation is 7,175 feet above mean sea level. Precipitation varies from 10 inches to 17 inches per year. Annual average temperature is 35° F., and the growing season varies between 13 and 70 days. Daily summer temperatures can reach extremes with afternoon highs in the 80s and nighttime lows in the 40s. Daily winter temperatures can reach afternoon highs in the 30s and lows in the 10s.
C. 
Quality of life/livability.
(1) 
The Town of Pinedale is a unique community boasting a high quality of life. Pine Street (U.S. 191) is the bustling main street, which bisects Pinedale and creates a small-town atmosphere cherished by residents and visitors alike. Pinedale has a prime location on the corridor connecting Jackson, Wyoming, to Denver, Colorado.
(2) 
The Town celebrates its unique Western flair through annual events, like the Green River Rendezvous Days, and the everyday charm of Western-inspired architecture. The Town is very livable with everything residents need within a few-block radius. Also, Pinedale has well-funded schools, a quality library system and a variety of other public amenities.
(3) 
The abundance of natural features and ease of access to recreational areas, including parks in and around the Town, contribute to the high quality of life. There are recreational activities, including trout fishing, skiing, hiking, and camping, available around Pinedale making it an all-season tourist destination. The proximity to Fremont Lake nestled in the Wind River Mountain Range as well as the Green and New Fork Rivers, Wyoming Range, and Gros Ventre Range make Pinedale a cherished location.
(4) 
While Pinedale is very livable, there are areas where the Town is working to improve the quality of life of its residents. The Town is currently investigating traffic calming techniques and traffic signal insertion due to growing concern of residents about the increased traffic along Pine Street. Additional sidewalks and bike lanes throughout Town are needed to bolster active transportation, such as walking and biking. Also, the lack of workforce housing is an important issue the Town is working to alleviate in order to accommodate service and skilled workers.

§ 275-4 Characteristics of Pinedale: specific.

A. 
Water.
(1) 
The Town's water supply was historically obtained from Pine Creek and includes some of the earliest direct-flow water rights dating from the late 1890s. Today, the majority of the water storage rights of the Town are in Fremont Lake. High flow volumes in Pine Creek during spring snowmelt unfailingly fill the storage capacity of 30,899.44 acre-feet in Fremont Lake. Pinedale owns portions of all four permits in the lake, totaling 58% or 17,963.91 acre-feet.
(2) 
The water supply system has been recently upgraded to include an additional transmission line. The older transmission line is still in use, but it is not the major line supplying the Town. A gravity flow pipeline transmits the water to the Town's distribution system to maintain pressure. The current flow capacity of the Town's water system is 10,000 gallons per minute.
Comparison Chart of Water Use
Water Use
Per Day
(gallons)
Per Minute
(gallons)
Per Day Per Person*
(gallons)
National average
255,000
177
150
Pinedale average
1,920,000
1,333
1,130
Pinedale peak
2,400,000
1,667
1,412
Pinedale peak, including fire flow**
4,560,000
3,167
26,824
NOTES:
*
Using population count of 1,700 people.
**
Fire flow is 1,500 gallons per minute.
(3) 
In order to understand the above chart, it needs to be mentioned that the figures in the third column representing water use per day per person does not subtract water that is used for watering lawns, or other maintenance activities. Even without this breakdown it is easy to see that water use in Pinedale is significantly higher than the national average.
(4) 
The chart illustrates that there is a lot of water being wasted through unregulated water consumption, which includes high summer irrigation of lawns and gardens, the practice of running bleeder lines continuously during winter months to prevent freezing and not shutting bleeder lines off in the summer. Mandatory water meters within new developments will help to curb over-consumption, but currently they are not in use. Many older residences still do not have water meters. For water conservation purposes and budgetary concerns, the Town encourages all homeowners to install a water meter on their property. In Town, water meters will eventually be required in all residences.
(5) 
Chemical and biological quality of the Town's water is good to excellent. This is due in a large part to the geographical and regional positioning of the Pine Creek drainage. The hydrologic area that provides water for Pine Creek is essentially totally covered with vegetation, primarily coniferous forest but also sagebrush grasslands, which at once locks soils in place to limit erosion and sediments transported by the streams, and slows melting rates in spring by providing shade on the snow. The drainage area for Fremont Lake is in a wilderness area, meaning there is little disturbance and human activity, which keeps water quality pure.
(6) 
For decades the Town's water supply was a direct pipe from Fremont Lake, with no purification additives. In the late 1970s, national water supply requirements for communities developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) were enforced in Pinedale. A chlorination facility near the lake is now a component of the distribution system. This facility will need to be expanded as a rising population increases the demands on water usage. Part of the EPA requirements are that water be in contact with chlorine for one hour prior to use; due to increasing flows this is becoming difficult to accomplish.
(7) 
Additional EPA protection measures for water supplies will require a secondary purification system to supplement the existing chlorine method; an ultra violet (UV) system is recommended. The Town is currently investigating a UV method that could be incorporated into the existing system, which could be in place and operating by 2009.
Data provided by Former State Water Commissioner.
B. 
Sewage treatment. The Town recently completed a redevelopment of its sewage lagoon. The current capacity of Pinedale's wastewater treatment facility is 1.5 million gallons per day or 1,041 gallons per minute. Peak flow this year was 1.01 million gallons per day, or 700 gallons per minute. The current design capacity of the system can accommodate a population of 2,500 people. There is the potential to expand the system to 3,000,000 gallons per day, which would accommodate a population of approximately 6,000 people. The Town is in the process of rehabilitating and replacing existing sewer lines to eliminate infiltration and inflow (INI). INI contributes greatly to the wastewater treatment at the wastewater treatment facility. The Town is currently undergoing a four-phase sewer rehabilitation program, of which the first two phases are being designed and the last two phases are scheduled for upcoming years. Funding for sewer rehabilitation generally comes from the State Land Investment Board's Mineral Impact Account and the Wyoming Business Council.
Data provided by Pinedale Public Works Department and Town Engineer.
C. 
Solid waste disposal.
(1) 
For many years, the Town operated a sanitary landfill, which served both the Town and the surrounding area. In the Spring of 1985, the operation of this landfill was taken over by Sublette County. Currently, the Town of Pinedale does not play a role in solid waste disposal. The county has a trash transfer station about 2 1/2 miles west of Town adjacent to U.S. Highway 191. Solid waste is collected at the transfer station, and then the county transports it to the Sublette County landfill located a few miles northeast of the Town of Marbleton.
(2) 
In 1991, the Recycling Board was born out of the dedication of a few local citizens. A Joint Powers Board, a partnership of the Town of Pinedale and Sublette County, now administrates the Recycling Board. The Recycling Board functions as an instrumentality as it was created by statute and implemented through the Joint Powers Board. Currently, the Recycling Center solicits cardboard, mixed paper, aluminum, and plastics. Eventually, the Recycling Center would like to be able to dispose of glass products as well. The Recycling Board works to encourage residents in the area to recycle and contribute to the process of waste diversion.
(3) 
In the next few years, the Recycling Center will be looking into acquiring a bigger facility in an appropriate location that is accessible to the community.
Data provided by Pinedale Public Works Department and Recycling Board.
D. 
Law enforcement.
(1) 
The Sublette County Sheriff's Department provides Pinedale with all law enforcement services. The main offices and jail facility of the Sublette County Sheriff's Department are in the Town of Pinedale. The Sheriff's Department keeps the peace and runs a detention facility. The detention facility currently can hold up to 50 inmates; by 2011 the detention facility will need to expand to house 75 inmates. Within the Sheriff's Department many divisions are housed, including Emergency Management, Drug Court, School Resources Officer, Court Room Security, Search and Rescue, Emergency Response Team, Narcotics Task Force, K-9 Operations, and Probation Office.
(2) 
Since 2001, the Sheriff's Department has grown exponentially. In 2001 the Department had 34 employees, 17 vehicles, and received 6,175 calls for service. In 2006, the Department had 73 employees, 35 vehicles, and received 8,348 calls for service. It is projected that in 2011 the Department will have approximately 84 employees, 46 vehicles, and receive 11,000 calls for service.
(3) 
Recently, the Wyoming State Highway Patrol permanently assigned four troopers and a lieutenant to the Pinedale area.
(4) 
The Town of Pinedale is in the process of hiring a Municipal Officer to assist in implementation and enforcement of the Town ordinances.
Data provided by Sublette County Sheriff's Department and Wyoming Highway Patrol.
E. 
Fire Department.[1] Pinedale has a Volunteer Fire Department, which serves both the Town and the northern part of Sublette County. Staffed by approximately 25 volunteers, the Department can field seven vehicles. Currently, the Town of Pinedale has an ISO rating of five; with upcoming review this number is expected to decrease. Given the increasing population and height of buildings, the Fire Department hopes to acquire an aerial ladder truck and potentially a larger facility within the next few years.
Data provided by Pinedale Volunteer Fire Department.
[1]
Editor's Note: See also Ch. 40, Fire Department, Volunteer.
F. 
Emergency medical services.
(1) 
In January of 2006, Pinedale Emergency Services and Big Piney EMS merged to form Sublette County Emergency Medical Services. The countywide service maintains two division clinics, one in Pinedale and the other in the Big Piney/Marbleton area. Each division clinic currently runs three ambulances and is staffed by a combination of career EMTs and local volunteers. A third ambulance facility, located at Sand Draw station, is scheduled to open in the Fall of 2007. This facility has a specially equipped ambulance, outfitted for access and service to the gas field workers and the high volume of traffic on US 191, as well as residents in the southeast corner of the county. Initially, crews from each of the other two services will rotate regularly out to Sand Draw until there is enough staff to station a crew permanently.
(2) 
Between 2001 and 2005, it is estimated that EMS runs within the Pinedale Division had increased by approximately 210%. As a result, the services could no longer rely on volunteers to man the ambulances. In 2003, the Sublette County Rural Health Care District, owners/operators of Sublette County EMS, changed the structure to a partially paid service, and began hiring paid, full-time EMTs for the first time in the organization's history.
(3) 
Currently, Sublette County EMS employs 50 EMTs, 21 as full-time employees and the remainder as volunteers. There are two supervisors, one over each division. Rural Health Care is currently experiencing the same difficulties recruiting personnel as similar organizations statewide due to the high cost of living. Available workforce housing would help resolve this issue. Once each division is fully staffed, sustainability of services is projected through the next five years.
(4) 
Increases in population will further stress the system. The increased numbers of travelers on the road results in more motor vehicle accidents, most of which result in an ambulance run. Further, production in the gas fields has brought a very large increase in population, and gas field accidents/injuries have increased. In addition to the increased incidents, the added difficulty of accessing gas field production sites increases response time as well as overall run time for ambulance teams.
(5) 
While the two division clinics are able to handle a majority of health care needs, Sublette County does not have a hospital. An ambulance run to the hospital results in a minimum of four- to four-and-one-half-hour turnaround. Helicopter pads are located at both clinics to accommodate life flight services. Three helicopter transport facilities assist Sublette County in times of emergency. The three facilities are Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls, Portneuf in Pocatello, Idaho, and the University of Utah's Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. Future considerations need to be made regarding transportation of those in medical need, including the ease of road access for emergency vehicles.
Data provided by Rural Health Care.
G. 
Transportation.
(1) 
U.S. 191, Pine Street, runs through Pinedale, serving as the "main street" for the Town and business district. Streets within Town are either improved gravel, oil and chip penetration, or asphalt mat. With isolated exceptions, most streets in Town have developed in an orderly manner. Standard asphalt paving and curbs and gutters should be installed on all existing streets. All future subdivisions should be required to have asphalt streets, sidewalks, and curbs and gutters.
(2) 
Street right-of-way widths are standardized through the Town Ordinance based on road classification, but there are some roads that vary from excessive (100 feet) to insufficient (30 feet or less). Standard rights-of-way and driving surface widths should be established in all subdivisions, taking into consideration traffic density and snow removal requirements. The Town has an inventory of the street system and an established snow route system for snow removal for plowing priority.
(3) 
Pine Street (U.S. 191) is currently maintained by the State of Wyoming's Transportation Department because of its classification as a highway and Pinedale's population. If population increases to 1,500 residents or more, the state will relinquish its maintenance of Pine Street to the Town. This is expected to happen by 2010, when the next census occurs. At this time the Town will need additional personnel and equipment, such as plow trucks, to serve Pine Street.
(4) 
Currently, Sublette County is working on a truck route, which will be used as an access route for the gas fields southwest of Town. This project is very important, as the truck route will help to reduce the traffic congestion and dependency on the Pine Street bridge on Tyler Avenue, the only structure spanning Pine Creek capable of handling overweight vehicle traffic. Because of the high traffic volume on Pine Street, traffic-calming elements are being explored by Town staff.
(5) 
The Town encourages active transportation, including walking and bike riding. The Sublette County Recreation Board developed a Pinedale Area Pathways Plan for the Pinedale Area. Continued implementation of this plan will provide for a comprehensive pathways system for the area. Active transportation contributes to the healthy living of residents by offering safe and reliable transportation options, and provides various environmental benefits for the community. The separation of pedestrian and vehicular traffic is also important to having a healthy active transportation system.
(6) 
In addition, the Town is actively undergoing a traffic study to evaluate road conditions, capacity, and safety in order to develop a comprehensive street maintenance and improvement plan.
Data provided by Pinedale Public Works Department.
H. 
Public facilities.
(1) 
Sublette County School District #1 represents the largest landowner in Pinedale. Federal, state, county, and local governmental agencies follow, with private and religious organizations making up the balance. Most of the existing governmental facilities are centrally located on along Pine Street.
(2) 
As the Town develops, conveniently located portions of the parkland/open space should be reserved to meet the growing needs of the residents. Existing parks should be maintained and improved as needed. Park upgrades have been identified and must remain a continuous priority along with parkland expansion projects. The area adjacent to Pine Creek should be considered for future conservation easements, open spaces, and parks.
(3) 
At present, the Town is considering the construction of a new Town Shop facility, which would house the Public Works Department and the Animal Control Department. The Public Works Department will continue to be affected by growth and population increases, and their need for new equipment and personnel will rise.
(4) 
Other public facilities available for use by residents as well as visitors include the Sublette County Visitors Center, the Mountain Man Museum, the Sublette County Library, Rendezvous Pointe, and the Rodeo Grounds.
I. 
Recreation.
(1) 
Residents and visitors alike enjoy recreational opportunities offered in and around Pinedale. Pinedale is located near the Bridger-Teton National Forest and within 10 miles of pristine wilderness areas. An abundance of fishermen, hunters, backpackers, snowmobile enthusiasts and others utilize the national forest and BLM land surrounding Pinedale.
(2) 
Three mountain ranges are within easy access of Pinedale: the Wind River, Gros Ventre, and Wyoming. These ranges offer camping, fishing, hiking, and climbing opportunities for visitors. Many of the major trailheads can also be found within these mountain ranges.
(3) 
Also, in the surrounding areas of Pinedale are ski resorts, dude ranches, trout streams, hot springs, and other outdoor recreational activities.
(4) 
Within Town, various public sports facilities exist, including a football field, tennis courts, indoor hockey rink, gymnasiums, basketball court, and skateboard park. The Town also has baseball diamonds, groomed cross-country ski trails, bike trails, and a rodeo grounds. At present, the Pinedale Aquatics Center is under construction, which will include pools, water recreation areas, indoor track, weight room, racquetball courts, and a gymnasium.
(5) 
Also, parklands are available for public use throughout the year and are located in various areas of Town. Boyd Skinner Park, Burzlander Park, American Legion Park, Split Diamond Park, and Trails Creek Park are the major parks in Pinedale. In addition, a nine-hole golf course is located just west of Town.
J. 
Wildlife.
(1) 
A unique aspect to Pinedale is the abundance of wildlife living in the surrounding BLM and National Forest Service Land. Moose, mule deer, eagles, sage grouse, pronghorn, black bears, and many other animals and birds call the area in and near of Pinedale home. Pinedale's location along the Pronghorn Migration Corridor provides ample opportunities to view these unique animals. The Pronghorn Migration Corridor near Pinedale is notable as it is the second longest mammal migration remaining in the Western Hemisphere, surpassed by only that of Arctic caribou, and it is only one of two pronghorn migrations that persist in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Efforts need to be taken to protect the Pronghorn Migration Corridor, their ranges, and the habitats of other native species.
(2) 
In and around Pinedale exists a network of rivers, creeks, streams, and mountain lakes, which provide prime habitat for fish. Various species of native cutthroat trout, such as Bonneville, Colorado, Snake River, and Yellowstone, can be found throughout the area, as well as lake trout, brook trout and other naturalized fish varieties.

§ 275-5 Characteristics of Pinedale: physical.

A. 
Land use patterns.
(1) 
Residential land use patterns.
(a) 
Residential development was traditionally centered around the "old" part of Town, which is now located within the present commercial zone.
(b) 
A large percentage of population growth has occurred within the eastern five-mile radius of the Town limits, creating somewhat of a "rural sprawl" character in that area. A number of subdivisions continue to be developed to the north, northwest, and south of Town.
(c) 
Portions of undeveloped land are currently located within the corporate limits of the Town for residential development. Sufficient water and sewer services exist at this time and will be phased into future residential developments as needed. Future development should take place with consideration given to both the Official Preferred Land Use Map and the Official Zoning Map. The Town ordinances should at all times guide development. Development should occur in progressive stages utilizing existing undeveloped areas within Town prior to developing outlying areas. Developers and property owners within the residential districts are encouraged to renovate existing buildings.
(2) 
Commercial land use patterns.
(a) 
Most commercial services within the Town of Pinedale are located on Pine Street (U.S. 191) in a large commercial district. In addition, several tracts of undeveloped land lie within in the commercial zone.
(b) 
Further commercial development should be contained within the existing commercial districts. Both developed and undeveloped land should be utilized prior to further expansion of the commercial districts. Developers and property owners within the commercial districts should be encouraged to renovate existing buildings.
B. 
Housing opportunity.
(1) 
The Town of Pinedale's intent is to facilitate the provision of choice, quality, affordability, and quantity in future housing. Provisions are made through the Town's ordinances to accommodate a variety of residential types, including but not limited to detached homes, semidetached homes, townhouses, condominiums, apartments, and mobile home dwellings. Discrimination is prohibited by federal, state and local laws, which are actively enforced.
(2) 
In regards to coordination, the provision of future housing needs is closely linked to the Official Preferred Land Use Map and Official Zoning Map. Coordination and evaluation of housing needs is the responsibility of local officials such as Town Council, Planning and Zoning Commission as well as the Town Planning and Zoning Department.
(3) 
In 2007, there were 930 residential buildings and 206 commercial buildings occupied within the Town of Pinedale. According to the Sublette County Socioeconomics Office, by 2015 the population of Pinedale will be 2,269. Given this, there will be a need for approximately 330 additional housing units within Town.
Data provided by Sublette County Socioeconomics Office.
C. 
Streetscape.
(1) 
The streetscape of Pine Street (U.S. 191) exemplifies its identity as a Western Town. A majority of buildings along Pine Street are built with Western facades. Future buildings and new constructions along Pine Street should conform to the character of existing buildings. The use of natural materials, particularly logs and wood, is encouraged.
(2) 
Pine Street needs to continue its appeal as a pedestrian-friendly corridor and a tourist draw. By encouraging commercial buildings along Pine Street to abut the sidewalk and have parking in an alternative location, such as behind or to the side, a pedestrian-friendly corridor will be promoted. Benches, lighting, information kiosks and other pedestrian amenities are necessary, as well as beautification elements such as flower planters and garbage cans. Awnings over many sidewalks create a unique pedestrian atmosphere. Street trees also provide needed shade along sidewalks, and the Town encourages the development of a street tree network.
(3) 
Sidewalks contribute to the streetscape by providing pedestrians with a safe route in the community. The Town encourages active transportation, which can be more easily accommodated by having sidewalks throughout the Town.
(4) 
As the Town continues to grow, there may be a need for implementing a Design Review Board to review the architectural design of new and renovated developments as a way to make sure the character of Pinedale is sustained. A study regarding the feasibility of such a board, or coupling the duties with the Planning and Zoning Commission, should be undertaken if the Town Council deems it necessary.
D. 
Preservation of Western culture.
(1) 
The Town of Pinedale has a rich history exemplified by how the Town developed as the farthest incorporated Town from a railroad. The unique wooden architecture existing along the main street illustrates how the Town was forced to develop using the available resources, in this case the surrounding forests.
(2) 
Sublette County is registered with the Wyoming State Historical Preservation Office's Certified Local Government Program. Residents from Pinedale sit on the Sublette Historical Preservation Commission, which was created through the Certified Local Government program. The group is very active and offers a wealth of information regarding the heritage of the Town.
(3) 
The Town of Pinedale has a designated historic district, which encompasses the four blocks (Magnolia to the North, Mill Street to the South, Maybell Avenue to the East, and Lake Avenue to the West) where the original Town site was founded in 1904. A plaque located at the corner of Franklin Avenue and Pine Street was dedicated to the founders of Pinedale during the hundredth anniversary of the Town of Pinedale.
(4) 
As an effort to preserve the character of the Town, the expanded designation of Pine Street (U.S. 191) as a heritage district is encouraged as an educational tool. By designating the area as such, the character of the streetscape and buildings will continue to strengthen the appeal of Pinedale.

§ 275-6 Official Preferred Land Use Map; purposes and permitted uses of land use districts.

There is hereby established a map, to be known as the "Official Preferred Land Use Map of the Town of Pinedale." This shall indicate streets, alleys, parks, and other public places. It shall further indicate the official preferred zoning districts for land within and up to a one-mile buffer from the corporate limits of the Town of Pinedale. This map shall be located and maintained in the Pinedale Town Hall, 210 W. Pine Street, Pinedale, Wyoming, and shall be available during regular business hours. Official Preferred Land Use Map is Map 1.
A. 
Purpose and permitted uses of land use districts. The following descriptions of land use districts are from Chapter 475, Zoning, of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(1) 
Agriculture (A). The Agriculture District is intended to allow for and protect agricultural uses within the Town by controlling density and land coverage and providing for compatible land uses. (See § 475-33.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: general agriculture, recreational camp, cemetery, golf course, greenhouse or plant nursery, public parks, and other uses outlined under § 475-34 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(2) 
Open Space (OS). The Open Space District is applied to parklands, recreational areas, and floodplain areas along streams, creeks, and rivers. Open space districts are encouraged for areas that are to be kept minimally developed. Development can occur in privately owned open space districts upon consideration by the Town. (Proposed zoning district.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: public parks, recreational areas, picnic shelters, sports fields, and other uses outlined under proposed open space section in Town ordinances.
(3) 
Residential - 1 (R-1). The Residential - 1 District is intended to be applied to lands which are suitable for low-density residential development within the existing community. The district also allows uses which are compatible with and provide support to a low-density residential environment. (See § 475-50.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: single-family dwellings, public parks, schools, churches, and other uses outlined under § 475-51 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(4) 
Residential - 2 (R-2). The Residential - 2 District is intended to provide for a compatible mixture of single-family and multifamily dwellings at a density slightly higher than that for single-family districts alone, plus the accessory public and semipublic uses offering services to the surrounding area. (See § 475-61.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: single-family dwellings, multifamily dwellings not to exceed four dwelling units, churches, community centers, and other uses outlined under § 475-62 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(5) 
Residential - 2A (R-2A). The Residential - 2A District is intended to provide for a compatible mixture of single-family and multifamily dwellings at a density slightly higher than that for single-family districts alone, plus the accessory public and semipublic uses offering services to the surrounding area. (See § 475-72.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: single-family dwellings, multifamily dwellings not to exceed two dwelling units, churches, community centers, and other uses outlined under § 475-73 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(6) 
Residential - 4 (R-4). The Residential - 4 District is intended to allow for a compatible mixture of multifamily dwellings at a medium density and other uses of an institutional or semipublic nature while maintaining a general residential environment. (See § 475-83.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: single-family dwellings, multifamily dwellings, boardinghouses, club or lodge, day care, hospital, museum, and other uses outlined under § 475-84 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(7) 
Residential Suburban (R-S). The Residential Suburban District is intended as a permanent residential district for those areas of the community where it is desired to maintain low residential densities. (See § 475-40.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: single-family dwellings, community centers, public parks and other uses outlined under § 475-41 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(8) 
Manufactured Homes (MH). The Manufactured Home District is intended to allow for manufactured homes, as defined in § 475-198, but which do not meet the standards of § 475-200, in a planned development. Other details of manufactured homes can be found in § 475-94. Manufactured homes include mobile homes, double-wide mobile homes, triple-wide mobile homes, modular structures and other manufactured style homes.
(a) 
Permitted uses: manufactured homes in a manufactured home court or park or a manufactured home subdivision containing two or more manufactured homes and comply with all the provisions of this regulation and the subdivision regulations of Town as well as public parks, community centers, and other uses outlined under § 475-95 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(9) 
Commercial 1 (C-1). The Commercial - 1 District is intended for the purpose of grouping those retail, commercial, institutional and office uses necessary for a central business district serving a major trade area larger than a segment of the community. This district is intended to be the most intensely developed of all the business districts. (See § 475-107.)
(a) 
Permitted uses:
[1] 
Commercial businesses of various types outlined in § 475-108, which includes stores, banks, motels, restaurants, and other retail and commercial establishments.
[2] 
Other uses as allowed in the R-1, R-2, and R-4 Zoning Districts, provided the lot area and setback requirements as established in said zoning districts are met, and other uses outlined under § 475-108 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(10) 
Commercial 2 (C-2). The Commercial - 2 District is intended to regulate the type and density of commercial development located along the access highway of the Town. The district has the same intent as the C-1 District but it can front a highway. (See § 475-117 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.) The District also allows for mixed land use in the form of residential apartments above commercial units.
(a) 
Permitted uses:
[1] 
Same as uses in C-1 Zoning District. (See § 475-118 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.)
[2] 
Residential uses, in the form of apartments permitted above commercial storefronts (proposed zone district change).
(11) 
Industrial -1 (I-1). The Industrial - 1 District is intended to allow a compatible mixture of light industrial uses, which do not require intensive land coverage, generate large volumes of traffic, or create obnoxious sounds, glare, dust, or odor. District regulations ensure compatibility with adjacent or nearby areas. (See § 475-127 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.)
(a) 
Permitted uses:
[1] 
Industrial establishments of various types outlined in § 475-128, which include manufacturing plants, wholesaling, and other industrial uses.
[2] 
Other uses as allowed in the R-1, R-2, R-4, C-1, and C-2 Zoning Districts, provided the lot area and setback requirements as established in said zoning districts are met, and other uses outlined under § 475-128 of the Code of the Town of Pinedale.
(12) 
Utility (U). The Utility District is intended to highlight Town-owned and operated utilities, which are necessary for the workings of the municipality. This currently includes existing utility areas such as water chlorination units and the sewer lagoon. (Proposed zone district.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: Town-owned utilities, and other uses to be stated under proposed Utility District zoning section in the Town ordinances.
(13) 
Recreational Vehicles (RV). The Recreational Vehicle District is intended as a temporary residential area for tourists, visitors, and nonpermanent workers in Pinedale. (Proposed zone district.)
(a) 
Permitted uses: recreational vehicles, public parks, and other uses outlined under proposed RV zoning section in the Town ordinances.

§ 275-7 Official Major Street Map.

There is hereby established a map, to be known as the "Official Major Street Map of the Town of Pinedale." This shall indicate both existing streets and extension of major and minor streets within undeveloped and underdeveloped land parcels in Town and within the one-mile buffer from the corporate limits of the Town of Pinedale. The purpose of this map is to illustrate the preferred extension of existing streets and logical development of new streets. This will allow the Town of Pinedale to grow in an appropriate manner with regards to directional ease and access by emergency vehicles. This map shall be located and maintained in the Pinedale Town Hall, 210 W. Pine Street, Pinedale, Wyoming, and shall be available during regular business hours. Official Major Street Map is Map 2.

§ 275-8 Official Growth Map.

There is hereby established a map, to be known as the "Official Growth Map of the Town of Pinedale." This shall indicate the areas of potential growth for the Town of Pinedale within and beyond the one-mile buffer from the corporate limits of the Town of Pinedale. The purpose of this map is to illustrate the preferred areas of growth and logical development of the Town. This will guide the Town of Pinedale on feasible areas for growth, particularly for planning and servicing purposes. This map shall be located and maintained in the Pinedale Town Hall, 210 W. Pine Street, Pinedale, Wyoming, and shall be available during regular business hours. Official Growth Map is Map 3.

§ 275-9 Land use directives.

A. 
Residential land use directives.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town must make planning decisions that provide adequate and suitable land to meet housing needs of all residents.
(2) 
Directive #2: Residential land serviced by existing utilities will be used prior to land not serviced.
(3) 
Directive #3: Adequate land must be set aside to accommodate a variety of housing types, including but not limited to detached homes, semidetached homes, townhouses, condominiums, apartments, and mobile home dwellings.
(4) 
Directive #4: Utilization and rehabilitation of existing structures is encouraged.
(5) 
Directive #5: New and renovated housing should comply with Town ordinances.
(6) 
Directive #6: The International Residential Code, Town ordinances, and other programs will be enforced in a fair and equitable manner with regards to residential buildings.
(7) 
Directive #7: Residential developments must be built in compliance with Town ordinances.
(8) 
Directive #8: Available land zoned commercial should be utilized prior to expanding upon commercial districts to fill need.
B. 
Commercial land use.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town must plan for adequate and suitable land to meet commercial land use needs.
(2) 
Directive #2: Commercial land serviced by existing utilities must be used prior to commercial land not serviced.
(3) 
Directive #3: Available land zoned commercial should be utilized prior to expanding upon commercial districts to fill need.
(4) 
Directive #4: A variety of commercial uses are encouraged within designated areas.
(5) 
Directive #5: Existing commercial buildings should be utilized and rehabilitated prior to new construction. Creative reuse is encouraged.
(6) 
Directive #6: New and renovated commercial buildings must comply with Town ordinances.
(7) 
Directive #7: The International Building Code, Town ordinances, and other programs will be enforced in a fair and equitable manner with regards to commercial buildings.
(8) 
Directive #8: Commercial developments must be built in compliance with Town ordinances.
C. 
Industrial land use.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town must plan for continuing use of industrial lands.
(2) 
Directive #2: Industrial land serviced by existing utilities should be used prior to industrial land not serviced.
(3) 
Directive #3: Available land zoned industrial should be used prior to expanding upon industrial districts to fill need.
(4) 
Directive #4: A variety of industrial uses are encouraged within designated areas.
(5) 
Directive #5: Existing industrial buildings should be utilized and rehabilitated prior to new construction. Creative reuse is encouraged.
(6) 
Directive #6: New and renovated industrial buildings must comply with Town ordinances.
(7) 
Directive #7: The International Building Code, ordinances, and other programs will be enforced in a fair and equitable manner with regards to industrial buildings.
D. 
Agricultural – rural land use.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town must plan for continuing use of agricultural lands, but must anticipate potential change in the use of these lands.
(2) 
Directive #2: The extension of water and sewer services to land designated as agricultural is discouraged for all uses other than those permitted by Town ordinances.
(3) 
Directive #3: Agricultural activities within Town will be permitted only in areas zoned for agricultural land use.
E. 
Floodplain land use.
(1) 
Directive #1: The development of floodplain areas is not allowed unless waived by the Town Council.
(2) 
Directive #2: If development is permitted, it will be in strict compliance with zoning restrictions and Town ordinances adopted by the Town pursuant to the National Flood Insurance Program, as well as other appropriate regulations imposed by state and federal authorities.
(3) 
Directive #3: The extension of water and sewer services to land designated as floodplain will not be allowed unless waived by Town Council.
F. 
Open space – recreational land use.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town seeks to conserve and develop recreational resources for the benefit of present and future generations, particularly Pine Creek and surrounding area.
(2) 
Directive #2: The extension of water and sewer services to land designated as open space is discouraged for all uses other than those permitted by Town ordinances.
(3) 
Directive #3: The Town will cooperate with Sublette County Recreation Board in developing recreational programs for all ages.
(4) 
Directive #4: The Town should acquire open space and parkland when available to create a continuous park network for the use of all residents, visitors, and tourists.
(5) 
Directive #5: Parks and recreational opportunities will be developed using school, historic, and scenic areas.
(6) 
Directive #6: The Town encourages new developments to set aside land for open space, particularly within new residential subdivisions, where open space can benefit the residents.
G. 
Historic and scenic lands.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town seeks to conserve and develop historic and scenic lands for the benefit of present and future generations.
(2) 
Directive #2: Identified historic sites on public lands will be preserved and protected, and the Town will work with private landowners to encourage preservation of historic sites.
(3) 
Directive #3: The Town will cooperate with appropriate state and federal agencies and private owners in preserving and protecting historic sites and structures under private ownership.
H. 
Public lands.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town must provide for a cooperative process of land use planning with other governmental agencies.
(2) 
Directive #2: Land use plans and zoning will be applicable to public, as well as, private lands.
(3) 
Directive #3: The Town will involve other governmental agencies in the development and implementation of land use plans, especially Sublette County, the Wyoming Highway Department, Sublette County School District #1, and other state and federal agencies.
(4) 
Directive #4: The Town will work with the Sublette County Historic Preservation Board to protect the rich heritage of the community.
I. 
Urban lands and large-scale development.
(1) 
Directive #1: The Town must provide for the orderly and appropriate location of urban land.
(2) 
Directive #2: The urban growth area, currently located along the Pine Street corridor, will be designated and expanded based upon land availability and projected needs. This is relative to time and the community's changing needs.
(3) 
Directive #3: It is the responsibility of the Planning and Zoning Commission and planning and engineering staff to identify anticipated large-scale developments and their impacts upon the Town.
(4) 
Directive #4: Lands for future urban uses will be identified in relation to availability of services such as sewer and water.
(5) 
Directive #5: Utility services will not be extended beyond the corporate Town limits unless waived by Town Council.
(6) 
Directive #6: The Town will annex adjacent areas when there is a proven benefit for annexation.
(7) 
Directive #7: Official zoning and subdivision ordinances[1] will be revised as needed to guide the growth and development of the community. Official zoning and subdivision ordinances are recommended to properly coordinate with the Department of Environmental Quality and other state agencies by directing the applicant to produce the proper permits verifying compliance from the agencies before final Town approval is granted.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 400, Subdivision of Land, and Ch. 475, Zoning.

§ 275-10 Goals and policies.

The goals and policy section defines a variety of issues the Town is concerned with. It sets actions the Town can do to reach the stated goals. These goals and policies should be reviewed every year to make sure the Town is keeping on track with issues concerning the community.
A. 
Citizen participation in planning process.
(1) 
Goal: "Provide citizens with information and opportunities to participate in the planning process of local government."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town of Pinedale has formed a Planning and Zoning Commission to serve as a vehicle for citizen involvement in the planning process. The Commission is comprised of residents who live in or within one mile of Pinedale and shall have the responsibility for planning and related activities.
(b) 
Policy #2: The Pinedale Planning and Zoning Commission shall provide an avenue for citizen participation with regards to planning issues.
(c) 
Policy #3: Information will be distributed to the public to increase its awareness, by making that information available to the public in the Town Hall and through the media.
(d) 
Policy #4: Decisions will be made by mutual agreement through open planning process, public meetings, and public hearings.
B. 
Environmental quality.
(1) 
Goal: "To maintain or improve the quality of air, water, land resources and open space."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town will encourage enforcement of federal and state air, land, and water quality standards.
(b) 
Policy #2: The Town will cooperate with the Department of Environment Quality implementing mandates with regards to stormwater management and erosion control.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town will cooperate with the Department of Environment Quality and Sublette County in the operation of any sanitary landfill site serving the Town of Pinedale.
(d) 
Policy #4: The extension of the Town sewer system to land designated as floodplain or agricultural is discouraged unless waived by Town Council.
(e) 
Policy #5: The Town shall not extend sewer service to subdivisions or individual property owners which are not located adjacent to existing sewer mains, except at the sole expense and maintenance cost of the developer or property owner.
(f) 
Policy #6: Intrusions such as tall signs and structures into open spaces shall be minimized. Federal and state regulations regarding cellular telephone towers must be followed.
(g) 
Policy #7: Air pollution due to heavy traffic should be curbed by making arterial and secondary streets more pedestrian friendly. Traffic studies and the insertion of traffic calming elements must be considered.
(h) 
Policy #8: Nuisances, and pests such as mosquitoes, shall be minimized or controlled with environmentally safe methods.
C. 
Recycling.
(1) 
Goal: "To increase the recycling rate by implementing a solid waste diversion and recycling plan."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town supports the recycling of various materials, including glass, plastic, paper, cardboard, and aluminum.
(b) 
Policy #2: The Town will work in conjunction with the Recycling Board to accomplish an increased rate of recycling in Town.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town supports the development of a Recycling Center that is user-friendly and at an appropriate, central location.
(d) 
Policy #4: The Town will work with the Recycling Board to implement the placement of recycling containers near existing garbage containers on major streets in Town within one year.
(e) 
Policy #5: The Town will work with the Recycling Board to implement a curbside pickup program for residents within the Town limits.
(f) 
Policy #6: The Town should work with the Recycling Board to provide builders with opportunities to recycle. Building materials, old and new, as well as associated packaging of building materials such as cardboard, paper, tin, aluminum, glass and plastic are strongly encouraged to be recycled.
(g) 
Policy #7: The Town will work with the Pine Street Project and the Recycling Board with regards to other recycling projects.
D. 
Economic analysis.
(1) 
Goal: "To pursue economic development activities to expand and diversify the local economic base."
(a) 
Policy #1: The land use plan must continue to identify and provide for an inventory of residential, commercial and industrial use to support projected needs.
(b) 
Policy #2: The Town will encourage and work towards attracting commercial and environmentally compatible industrial in addition to recreation-related businesses.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town will encourage appropriate commercial service centers in the commercial area.
(d) 
Policy #4: The Town will focus on water, sewer, and surface infrastructure improvements to increase property values and make the Town more desirable to existing and future residents.
E. 
Natural resource management.
(1) 
Goal. "To plan land use consistent with orderly development, use, and conservation of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources."
(a) 
Policy #1: Consideration will be given to natural resources in the development and use of land.
(b) 
Policy #2: Development decisions will be made following evaluation of the effects upon environmental quality and with regards to EPA standards.
(c) 
Policy #3: Developers will be required to provide appropriate information regarding the environmental effects of their proposal, including, but not limited to, air, land, and water quality. This includes environmental assessments, as well as supplemental reports, including traffic and drainage studies.
(d) 
Policy #4: Roads, improvements and utilities shall be constructed in accordance with federal, state and Town regulations.
(e) 
Policy #5: Soil conservation and wildlife management measures should be considered to enhance agriculture and wildlife habitats.
(f) 
Policy #6: The Town should encourage developers to practice low-impact development techniques as outlined by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the National Association of Home Builders.
F. 
Water resource management.
(1) 
Goal: "To conserve water and to relate water resources and development to desired land use."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town shall not extend water services to subdivisions or individual property owners which are not adjacent to existing water mains, except at the sole expense and maintenance cost of the developer or property owner.
(b) 
Policy #2: The Town shall encourage water conservation through the mandatory installation of water meters in old and new developments. Water usage in the Town of Pinedale is approximately 1,130 gallons per day per person, which exceeds the national average of 150 gallons per day per person.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town will develop a system to install water meters within areas where they currently do not exist. Upon making sure each dwelling has a water meter, the Town will work toward implementing the use of them.
G. 
Natural hazards.
(1) 
Goal: "To minimize the loss of life and property from natural hazards."
(a) 
Policy #1: Development may be restricted or prohibited within areas of natural hazards unless safeguards are provided by the developer/builder to protect the property in question, as well as adjacent properties, from damage.
[1] 
The Town of Pinedale should enact appropriate regulations pursuant to the National Flood Insurance Program to help alleviate the impact of flooding.
[2] 
Regulations should be established to control the development of property containing soils or slopes, which have been identified as posing significant hazards to the property in question or adjacent property.
(b) 
Policy #2: Land treatment and stream bank protection should be provided for Town-owned areas subject to erosion.
(c) 
Policy #3: Pinedale should be an involved agent with the Sublette County Homeland Security Program to foster local emergency preparedness, such as dam releases and fires.
(d) 
Policy #4: Pinedale should cooperate with federal, state, and local fire companies to help protect the Town and surrounding area from the potential of forest fire.
H. 
Public facilities and services.
(1) 
Goal: "To plan for the provision of public facilities and services, including safe and efficient transportation and utility systems in coordination with local land use policies, goals, and objective."
(a) 
Policy #1: No development will be permitted in areas designated for urban development until water and sewer services are provided.
(b) 
Policy #2: A drainage study will be conducted to determine the best means of channeling stormwater and floodwater runoff into an effective drainage system. All subsequent development will be required to develop in regards to Town policy related to drainage systems.
(c) 
Policy #3: Efforts will be made to maintain and upgrade fire protection.
(d) 
Policy #4: Adequate parking shall be provided for all commercial and industrial development. Rear and side parking options are supported over front parking as to allow for businesses to abut the sidewalk.
(e) 
Policy #5: Existing streets shall be improved, including the construction of sidewalks in older areas, as resources and funding permit.
(f) 
Policy #6: All new developments shall provide for streets improvements which meet Town standards. New streets will align with existing Town streets.
(g) 
Policy #7: Street patterns will be developed to provide efficient movement of traffic and for ease of emergency vehicles.
(h) 
Policy #8: Street layouts will be evaluated based upon safety, efficiency, and costs. Efforts will be made to minimize the number of individual access approaches to the major highway.
(i) 
Policy #9: Pedestrians' needs, including those who are handicapped, shall be given consideration in planning facilities.
(j) 
Policy #10: The Town will provide a means for garbage collection and disposal in cooperation with public and private agencies.
(k) 
Policy #11: The Town will continue its capital improvement programs and budget for future service provisions.
(l) 
Policy #12: Capital costs for provision of services, such as water and sewer, as well as impacts of downstream drainage in new developments, shall be borne by the developer/landowner.
(m) 
Policy #13: The needs of differently abled and handicapped persons shall be given consideration in the planning of public facilities and public services.
I. 
Energy conservation.
(1) 
Goal: "To provide for adequate, suitable land to meet the needs of all residents in a way that conserves energy and resources."
(a) 
Policy #1: Commercial uses will be encouraged to concentrate in the smallest geographical area. Commercial uses shall not be encouraged in noncommercial areas.
(b) 
Policy #2: Residential areas will be encouraged to develop in proximity to schools and shopping facilities.
(c) 
Policy #3: Vacant land within the existing platted areas will be encouraged for development prior to development of land located in outlying areas.
(d) 
Policy #4: The Town will encourage all residents and commercial building owners to insulate and otherwise "winterize" their homes and businesses in order to conserve energy.
(e) 
Policy #5: The Town will encourage the use of renewable energy through the administration and enforcement of its ordinances related to renewable energy, such as solar and wind.
(f) 
Policy #6: The Town will examine the use of full-cut off fixtures and light shades as a way to help curb light pollution in the area.
J. 
Grant procurement.
(1) 
Goal: "To acquire state, federal, and private grants for projects in the Town of Pinedale."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town shall seek out grants for infrastructure, community development, and economic development projects.
(b) 
Policy #2: Grants focusing on diversification of industry, community enhancement and improvement, as well as infrastructure upgrades, are to be considered highly important.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town will work to prioritize grants and produce sound grant applications.
(d) 
Policy #4: The Town will partner with local community organizations to acquire grants and develop programs that will benefit the whole community.
(e) 
Policy #5: The Town will work with the Wyoming Business Council and other granting agencies, both public and private, to ensure all grant requirements are fulfilled.
(f) 
Policy #6: Grants shall be administered from inception to completion by grant specialist in collaboration with pertinent Town departments.
K. 
Parking.
(1) 
Goal: "To provide adequate parking for all residents, visitors, and tourists."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town will undergo a traffic study to understand the parking needs of the community.
(b) 
Policy #2: The Town will work towards increasing handicapped parking to accommodate its residents in need.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town will work towards increasing available parking in appropriate locations. Parking that is central to commercial areas, yet not altering the surrounding area, or the walkability of the area is most appropriate.
L. 
Land use decisionmaking.
(1) 
The following goal and policies provide a framework for planning needed facilities and developments and regulating their effect on land use and the environment.
(2) 
Goal: "To coordinate decisions on land use and public facilities with regards to economic factors, community factors, and local design trends."
(a) 
Policy #1: The Town will identify sufficient land for industrial, residential, and commercial uses, which minimize conflicts with other land uses.
(b) 
Policy #2: In making land use and facility decisions, the Town will consider the identified and targeted needs of the community with respect to community and economic development.
(c) 
Policy #3: The Town should work with Sublette County School District #1 to understand how development and changes within Town impact the school system.
(d) 
Policy #4: Residents must be educated about land use planning decisions and its effects. Community input regarding land use decisions should be considered with high regard.
(e) 
Policy #5: The Town of Pinedale planning and engineering staff must provide adequate reports with regards to each land use proposal. The reports produced will provide information to the Planning and Zoning Commission, as well as Town Council, about proposed developments. The Planning and Zoning Commission and Town Council shall use the reports to make informed decisions regarding each proposal. Planning and zoning reports should also be available to Pinedale residents for educational purposes.
(f) 
Policy #6: Proposed support services will be evaluated on a cost/benefit basis.
(g) 
Policy #7: Comments on public plans and proposed developments will be requested from the county and other concerned organizations, as deemed necessary, prior to making decisions.
(h) 
Policy #8: Town encourages new and existing developments to enhance the character of Pinedale through adhering to local design trends, including Western facades.
(i) 
Policy #9: With continued growth, the Town should examine the possibility of implementing a Design Review Board to review the design of new and renovated developments.
(j) 
Policy #10: New subdivisions should be designed appropriately with regards to both local existing architecture and local design trends, such as Western facades.
(k) 
Policy #11: The Town encourages the use of sustainable and green design. The Town encourages the building of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified buildings.

§ 275-11 Coordination.

A. 
The Town will insure coordination of planning activities with appropriate governmental agencies and organizations.
B. 
The Town will provide input to the planning processes of other entities when appropriate.
C. 
The Town shall coordinate informing affected residents of proposed developments. An attempt must be made to inform all residents within 1,000 feet of the proposed development.
D. 
The Town and Sublette County should coordinate and exchange information regarding developments within the one-mile buffer around the corporate boundaries of Town.
E. 
Area-wide coordination will be obtained through participation in the review and approval process between the Town, developers, public and appropriate entities.

§ 275-12 Evaluations and review.

The Master Plan, Official Preferred Land Use Map, Official Major Street Map, and Official Zoning Ordinances and Subdivision Ordinance[1] of the Town of Pinedale shall be reviewed, evaluated and updated on an annual basis.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 400, Subdivision of Land, and Ch. 475, Zoning.

§ 275-13 Effect of adoption.

The Master Land Use Plan and its associated map(s), and any additions, deletions, or amendments thereto, constitute the definitive document for planning the growth and development of the Town of Pinedale. Thus, the intent of the Plan is that the ordinances and regulations of the Town will adhere as near as possible to the goals and policies expressed within the Plan, unless good cause is found to deviate therefrom. In like manner, the use of land within the area encompassed by the Official Preferred Land Use Map will be encouraged to reflect those preferred uses depicted thereon. However, it is recognized that the legislative and regulatory actions of the Town's officers and officials must be ever responsive to the changing needs of the community and the legitimate desires of its citizens. Wyoming State Statute Section 15-1-503 requires the Town to have a Master Plan in place; therefore, it is adopted and is intended to be used as a guide, not a mandate. Annual review is required.