Township of Lower Providence, PA
Montgomery County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
The following principles of subdivision and land development, general requirements and minimum standards of design shall be observed by the applicant in all instances:
A. 
All portions of a tract being subdivided shall be taken up in lots, streets, public lands or other proposed uses so that the remnants and landlocked areas shall not be created.
B. 
When only a portion of a tract is being reviewed, relative to subdivision and land development, but where future subdivision or development is likely, the applicant shall submit a nonbinding sketch as a condition of approval of his plan demonstrating that the remainder of the tract or parcel may be subdivided or developed in conformance with the existing zoning classification of land use in a logical manner. Such sketch of the remainder of the tract or parcel shall be kept in the Township files, and it shall not be recorded with the final plan.
C. 
Applicants shall preserve trees, groves, waterways, scenic points, historic spots and other community assets and landmarks whenever possible.
D. 
Subdivisions and land developments shall conform to existing topography to avoid the necessity for excessive cut or fill unless specifically warranted by terrain or location.
E. 
Land within the Township's Floodplain Conservation District[1] shall not be developed, and it shall not be used for any uses which may involve danger to health, safety, morals and general welfare.
[1]
Editor's Note: A description of the Floodplain Conservation District is contained in the Zoning Ordinance; see Ch. 143, Zoning.
F. 
The standards of design in this article should be used to judge and ascertain the adequacy of subdivision or land development proposals. Where the applicant believes that the literal application of any of these standards would cause undue hardship or be plainly unreasonable and unnecessary, the applicant shall request, in writing, that a waiver be granted and present the justification for the request. The Township Engineer and the Township Planning Commission may recommend such reasonable requests, and the Board of Supervisors may grant such reasonable exception if, in its opinion, it will not be contrary to the public interest. If a written request for a waiver is not submitted, these standards will be applied literally.
G. 
The standards included in these regulations are minimum design requirements. The Board of Supervisors reserves the right in any case to request that development features exceed these standards if conditions so warrant. The Board of Supervisors will seek a recommendation from the Planning Commission and others before increasing the requirements.
H. 
Applicants shall observe the ultimate rights-of-way for contiguous existing streets as prescribed by the Ultimate Right-of-Way Map for the Township.[2] Additional portions of the corridors for such streets shall be offered to the government agency having jurisdiction at the time the subdivision or land development is consummated. Applicable building setback lines, as defined by Chapter 143, Zoning, shall be delineated as measured from the ultimate right-of-way.
[2]
Editor's Note: The Ultimate Right-of-Way Map is available for examination in the Township offices.
I. 
Improvement construction requirements will be completed under specifications of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Department of Environmental Protection, the Montgomery County Conservation District or other appropriate agencies. In the event of conflict, the specifications contained in this Part 1 shall govern.
The subdivider, developer or builder shall, where specified by the governing body, construct and install, with no expense to the Township, the streets, curbs, sidewalks, water mains, sanitary and storm sewers, streetlights, fire hydrants, street signs, shade trees, monuments and other facilities and utilities specified in this article. Construction and installation of such facilities and utilities shall be subject to inspection by appropriate Township officials during the progress of the work, and the subdivider shall pay for inspection.
A. 
The standards of design in this article shall be used to judge the adequacy of subdivision proposals. Whenever the literal application of these standards would cause undue hardship or be contrary to current site planning practices, the Township Planning Commission may recommend such reasonable modifications to the Township Board of Supervisors as will not be contrary to public interests.
B. 
In reviewing subdivision or land development plans, the governing body shall refer such plans to the Township Planning Commission, Township Engineer and Montgomery County Planning Commission and any other agencies as may be appropriate for recommendations concerning the adequacy of existing and proposed community facilities to serve the additional uses proposed by the subdivision or land development.
C. 
Subdividers are requested to give careful consideration to the desirability of providing adequate rights-of-way and paving on existing streets and reserving areas and easements for facilities normally required in residential areas, including libraries, schools and other public buildings; parks, playgrounds and playfields; and sanitary sewer facilities in those areas that cannot be immediately joined to the existing stormwater, water and sanitary sewer systems of the Township.
D. 
Areas provided or reserved for such community facilities should be adequate to provide for building sites, landscaping and off-street parking as appropriate to the use proposed. The Board of Supervisors reserves the right to accept or refuse officers of dedication for public use.
All new streets and extensions and widenings of existing streets:
A. 
Shall be offered for dedication to the Township; county roads shall first be offered to the county; an offer of dedication shall be placed on the recorded plan for state roads.
B. 
Shall conform to the circulation element of the Township Comprehensive Plan, as amended, Township Ultimate Right-of-Way Map[1] and county or state highway plans and be coordinated with existing streets.
[1]
Editor's Note: The Ultimate Right-of-Way Map is available for examination in the Township Offices.
C. 
Shall provide appropriate access between abutting tracts of land for immediate or future use.
D. 
Shall create a road hierarchy among interior subdivision and land development streets and exterior streets to ensure proper through traffic flow, local access and internal traffic distribution and flow.
E. 
Shall be related closely to existing topography to assure reasonable grades, alignment and drainage and appropriate access to lots and to minimize regrading and removal of vegetation.
F. 
Shall be designed to continue existing streets at equal or greater right-of-way and cartway width, as recommended by the Township Engineer and Planning Commission.
G. 
Insofar as possible, streets on which structures are to front are encouraged to be oriented in a general east-west direction in order to provide structures with southern exposure and to permit the utilization of solar energy.
Every street, road or highway within the Township shall be classified as one of the following and shall be subject to the requirements contained in this article for that classification:
A. 
Classifications.
(1) 
Primary arterials.
(a) 
Limited access (expressways).
(b) 
Semicontrolled access highways.
[1] 
Urban.
[2] 
Rural.
(2) 
Secondary arterials.
(a) 
Collectors.
(b) 
Feeders.
(3) 
Residential streets.
(4) 
Cul-de-sac streets.
(5) 
Marginal access streets.
(6) 
Performance streets.
(a) 
Residential access streets.
(b) 
Residential subcollector streets.
(c) 
Residential collector streets.
(d) 
Marginal access streets.
B. 
Primary arterials. Primary arterials are the major highways which carry high volumes of through traffic [generally over 10,000 average daily trips (ADT)] and which deny or restrict access to adjacent properties. Primary arterials are classified as follows:
(1) 
Limited access highways deny access from adjacent properties and provide access only at a limited number of grade-separated interchanges. This classification of highway is not governed by this Part 1 because of its characteristics and the fact that only such agencies as the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation or Turnpike Commission would construct and/or operate such roads. Only the Pottstown Expressway fits into this classification, and no additional limited access highways are anticipated in the Township.
(2) 
Semicontrolled access highways restrict direct access from adjacent properties as much as is reasonably possible and encourage the use of other streets intersecting the highway or the use of marginal access streets to provide access. Grade level intersections will be spaced at large enough intervals to facilitate the safe and convenient flow of traffic. Semicontrolled access highways are further classified as urban or rural, and they carry high traffic volumes (over 10,000 ADT) for both local and intercommunity trips. Ridge Pike, Germantown Pike, Trooper Road (part), Egypt Road and Route 363 (Park Avenue) within Lower Providence fall into this category. Semicontrolled access highways shall be further classified according to their function as follows:
(a) 
Urban semicontrolled access highways generally carry high volumes of commercial, industrial or residential traffic from adjacent land uses, including shopping centers and industrial parks. This classification applies to highways where the majority of the adjacent frontage is developed.
(b) 
Rural semicontrolled access highways carry high volumes of through traffic, and the adjacent land uses include low-density residential or agricultural uses and recreation areas. The portions of Ridge Pike and Germantown Road crossing Evansburg State Park fall into this category.
C. 
Secondary arterials. Secondary arterials are those streets or highways which collect, carry and feed medium volumes of traffic (generally under 10,000 ADT) and connect areas within and adjacent to the Township. Secondary arterials shall be further classified as follows:
(1) 
Collectors serve to connect primary arterials with lesser classified streets and distribute traffic throughout the Township and adjacent areas.
(2) 
Feeders serve to connect collectors and/or higher road classifications with residential streets and/or neighborhoods within the Township. The right-of-way or cartway width for feeder streets is lower than for collectors because they carry less traffic generally and they are intended to carry very little commercial or truck traffic.
D. 
Residential streets. Residential streets are those streets which carry low volumes of traffic and which are used to provide access to residential properties and connect with other residential streets and streets of a higher classification.
E. 
Cul-de-sac streets. Cul-de-sac streets are those streets with one end open for vehicular access and the other end terminating in a vehicular turnaround. Cul-de-sac streets shall comply with the provisions of § 123-30A.
F. 
Marginal access streets. Marginal access streets are streets parallel and adjacent to an arterial street which provide access to abutting properties and separation from through traffic. They serve to reduce the number of access points which intersect the larger road, thereby increasing the efficiency and safety of traffic flow along the major road while providing access to abutting development. Marginal access streets shall comply with the provisions of § 123-30B.
G. 
Performance streets. Performance streets are residential streets which form a hierarchy of residential streets based on the anticipated average daily trips (ADT) to be generated by residential development fronting on the streets. All developments proposing to use performance streets shall contain 100 dwelling units or more to utilize all three levels of streets, including residential access streets, residential subcollector streets and residential collector streets. Performance streets may only be used in a residential development upon approval of the Board of Supervisors and shall comply with the provisions of § 123-30C. Performance streets are classified as follows:
(1) 
Residential access street. This is the lowest order street in the hierarchy. It is intended to carry the least amount of traffic at the lowest speed. It will provide the safest and most desirable environment for a residential neighborhood.
(2) 
Residential subcollector street. This is the middle order street in the hierarchy. A residential subcollector is a frontage street which provides access to abutting properties and which may also conduct traffic from residential access streets that intersect it.
(3) 
Residential collector street. This is the highest order of street in the hierarchy. It is designed to carry residential traffic to secondary streets at higher speeds.
(4) 
Marginal access street. This street is the same as the marginal access street in Subsection F, except that is used as a performance street serving exclusively residential properties.
A. 
Cul-de-sac streets must comply with the following requirements:
(1) 
Temporary culs-de-sac are those constructed to an abutting property line with the intention that such road will be extended onto the adjoining property at a future date as a logical step in the circulation network of the neighborhood, superblock or area. Temporary culs-de-sac shall meet the following requirements:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(a) 
Temporary culs-de-sac shall be built to the tract boundary line at a location and grade that are logical for extension onto the abutting tract.
(b) 
The temporary cul-de-sac turnaround shall be designed in one of the following configurations, as shown in Figure 1,[1] rather than the typical bulb configuration of the permanent cul-de-sac:
[1] 
L-Type.
[2] 
T-Type.
[3] 
Y-Type.
[4] 
Branch.
[1]
Editor's Note: Figure 1 is included at the end of this chapter.
(c) 
With the exception of the turnaround configuration, the temporary culs-de-sac shall be built to the same standards as permanent culs-de-sac.
(d) 
Those portions of the cul-de-sac turnaround extending beyond the street right-of-way of 50 feet shall be constructed on temporary access easements, valid only until the road is extended.
(e) 
Upon extension of the street, the full rights and responsibilities for the area of the temporary easements shall revert to the owners of the lots on which they are located.
(f) 
The developer responsible for construction of the temporary cul-de-sac shall be responsible for placing and maintaining a sign within the turnaround area, reading "Temporary Cul-de-Sac."
(g) 
The developer responsible for extension of the street shall also be responsible for the following:
[1] 
Removal of all curbing and paving of the temporary turnaround beyond the width of the street's cartway.
[2] 
Installation of new sidewalk, curbing and cartway paving to complete the street connection.
[3] 
Extension of utilities as necessary.
[4] 
Grading, installation and/or restoration of lawn areas where affected by this removal and construction process and repair of any other improvements damaged by this process.
(2) 
Permanent culs-de-sac provide access only to abutting lots within the tract being subdivided or developed. A permanent cul-de-sac:
(a) 
Shall be constructed to the specifications of street curbing and sidewalks hereinafter included in these standards for residential roads.
(b) 
Shall have a minimum right-of-way width of 50 feet and paving width of 26 feet and a circular turnaround with a minimum right-of-way radius of 60 feet and a paving radius of 50 feet. No parking shall be permitted in the circular turnaround and shall be so posted.
(c) 
Shall not be approved as part of a four-way intersection or as a continuation of a through road, unless special conditions warrant approval of either of the above by the Board of Supervisors.
(d) 
Shall not be approved when a through road is practicable.
(e) 
Shall not be less than 250 feet nor more than 800 feet in length, measured from the near side of the ultimate right-of-way of the intersecting road to the farthest point of the right-of-way of the turnaround, nor serve more than 10 dwelling units, unless special conditions warrant approval by the Supervisors.
(f) 
Unless the extension of the roadway is imminent, where it is proposed that a road be constructed to an abutting property line with the intention that such road will be extended onto the adjoining property at a future date, the temporary terminated cul-de-sac shall be constructed in the same manner as one which is permanently terminated, including the right-of-way width. Construction of the street curbing and sidewalk shall be in accordance with specifications hereinafter included in these standards.
(g) 
Shall be served by an appropriately located emergency accessway when required by the Supervisors.
B. 
Marginal access streets must comply with the following requirements:
(1) 
Marginal access streets are required along primary and secondary arterials as an alternative to stripping off lots along existing or proposed collectors, feeders and higher order streets.
(2) 
The Board of Supervisors reserves the right to require marginal access streets along any street where local vehicular access to individual lots would create congestion and/or hazards to traffic flow and safety by reason of street grades, land forms, vegetation, frequency of driveway intersections, limited sight distances, heavy traffic volumes and/or high-speed traffic flows.
(3) 
Access shall be provided to properties along only one side of the marginal access street.
(4) 
The location of a marginal access street shall be essentially parallel and adjacent to the street along whose margin it is located.
(5) 
The right-of-way for this type of street shall abut and be measured from the ultimate right-of-way of the parallel street.
(6) 
When forming a necessary leg of another classification of street, marginal access streets shall be governed by the regulations of the higher street classification.
(7) 
A landscaped barrier island, at least 20 feet wide, shall physically separate the cartways of the marginal access street and the parallel street.
(8) 
Sidewalks, when required, shall be located on the outermost portion of the marginal access street right-of-way, abutting the building lots.
C. 
Performance streets are residential streets that must comply with the following regulations:
(1) 
Performance streets may be used in a residential development upon approval of the Board of Supervisors when submitted in conjunction with a tentative sketch plan in accordance with §§ 123-12, 123-13 and this section of this Part 1.
(2) 
The following chart shall be used to determine the anticipated average daily traffic levels of proposed residential development:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
Housing Types
Average Daily Trip Generation Rates per Dwelling Unit
Single-family detached
10.00
Twin, duplex, multiplex or townhouses, etc.
8.10
Apartment
5.40
Mobile home
5.38
Retirement village
3.30
(3) 
A residential access street shall provide access to abutting properties, and it shall be designed to carry no more traffic than that which is generated on the street itself. Each residential access street shall be designed so that no section of the street conveys an average daily trips (ADT) volume greater than 200. Each half of a loop street may be regarded as a single local access street, and the total calculated traffic volume generated on a loop street shall not exceed 400 ADT.
(4) 
Residential subcollector streets are middle order frontage streets that shall comply with the following:
(a) 
Each subcollector street shall be designed so that no section of it will convey a traffic volume greater than 500 ADT. Each half of a loop subcollector street and the total traffic volume conveyed on a loop street shall not exceed 1,000 ADT.
(b) 
Subcollector streets shall be designed to exclude all external through traffic which has neither origin nor destination on the subcollector or its tributary residential access street.
(5) 
Residential collector streets are the highest order performance streets that shall comply with the following:
(a) 
Whenever possible, residential collector streets should be designed to have no residential lots fronting on them. When this is not possible, the amount of residential frontage shall not exceed the limits set forth in the accompanying chart. In addition, only lots having frontages of 100 feet or greater may front on collector streets, and space shall be provided on these lots for turnarounds so that vehicles will not have to back out onto collector streets.
(b) 
Cartway width and frontage.
ADT LEVEL
1,000 to 1,199
1,200 to 1,599
1,600 to 1,999
2,000 and over
Percentage of allowable access frontage
20
10
5
0
Cartway width (feet)
22
22
22
24
(c) 
No on-street parking shall be permitted on residential collector streets.
(6) 
Marginal access streets used as performance streets shall meet the requirements of § 123-30B, plus the following additional requirements:
(a) 
Marginal access streets shall be classified and designed to conform to the design standards and service restrictions of either residential access or subcollector streets according to the anticipated ADT volume.
(b) 
Intersection spacing. The minimum distance between intersections of the marginal access street with residential collectors shall be 300 feet and, with higher order streets, shall be determined by the Township Engineer based upon the traffic characteristics of the higher order street.
(c) 
Distance between cartways. A minimum distance of 20 feet shall be provided between the marginal access street cartway and the higher order cartway. This area shall be used to provide a visual screen between the roadways by landscaping and/or a berm.
(d) 
Marginal access streets are required as an alternative to stripping off lots along existing or proposed collectors or higher order streets.
(7) 
Cartway width and parking for performance streets are as follows:
Parking Provisions
   Street Standards
Type of Street
Lot Width at Right-of-Way
(feet)
On-lot1
Spillover2
Cartway Width
(feet)
Driveway Access
Residential access:
Minimum intensity of development
100 or greater
on-lot
on-lot
20
yes
Average intensity of development
40 to 100
on-lot
on-street
263
yes
Residential subcollector:
Minimum intensity of development
100 or greater
on-lot
on-lot
22
yes
Average intensity of development
40 to 100
on-lot
on-street
364
yes
Residential5collector
100 or greater
on-lot
on-lot6
2 2/245
yes5
(frontage lots)
NOTES:
1 As required by the Zoning Ordinance.
2 As required by § 123-30C(8), which follows.
3 Cartway may be reduced to 20 feet for marginal access streets.
4 Cartway may be reduced to 28 feet if residential lots will front on only   one side of the street.
5 See § 123-30C(5) above for additional requirements for residential   collectors.
6
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(8) 
Spillover parking shall be provided, in addition to the parking required by Chapter 143, Zoning, in conjunction with performance streets according to the following ratio:
Housing Type
Spillover Parking Spaces Required per Dwelling Unit
Single-family detached
1.0
Twin, townhouse
1.0
Duplex, multiple, apartment
0.5
(9) 
Existing streets. In instances where a proposed performance street connects to an existing residential street, the number of dwellings with access onto the existing street shall be added to the number of proposed dwellings on the connecting performance street to determine the traffic volumes and the performance street classification of the proposed street.
D. 
Private streets may be permitted to serve the function of residential streets, cul-de-sac streets or marginal access streets, when approved by the Board of Supervisors, upon recommendation of the Township Planning Commission and/or the Township Engineer. Private streets shall comply with the following:
(1) 
Private streets shall be constructed to the same standards and shall be subject to the same restrictions as public streets of the same type.
(2) 
The Township shall have no maintenance obligation for approved private streets; maintenance of such private streets shall be the full and sole responsibility of an association or other legally binding organization of landowners with access rights, subject to the criteria below:
(a) 
An association or other legally binding organization of landowners with access rights on the private street shall be formed and administered for the purpose of maintenance of the private street.
(b) 
All property owners in such an association shall have an equal share in the rights and bear an equal share of the costs of maintaining the private streets.
(c) 
Documents governing such association shall be filed with the Township, and the Board of Supervisors, upon the recommendation of the Township Solicitor, shall have authority for approval of such association.
(d) 
All properties depending on a private street for access shall be guaranteed in irrevocable right to that access under the terms of a right-of-way, access easement or other legal covenant. Such access right shall be clearly noted on the subdivision and/or land development plans which create a private street, shall be included in deeds for all properties with access rights and shall be recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds of Montgomery County.
(e) 
Documents governing maintenance associations for private streets shall be recorded with each deed for properties with access rights.
(f) 
Private streets are generally intended to be used as permanent cul-de-sac streets rather than as through streets connecting two public streets.
(3) 
Private streets will not be approved by the Board of Supervisors unless it can be demonstrated that a public street is not needed due to unusual circumstances. Private streets may not serve more than five residential lots or dwelling units; more than five lots or dwellings shall be served by a public street.
(4) 
Whenever a subdivider proposes to establish a street which is not offered for dedication to public use, the Board of Supervisors may require the subdivider to submit and also to record with the plan a copy of an agreement made with the Township on behalf of his/her heirs, successors and assigns. The agreement shall establish the conditions under which the street may later be offered for dedication and should stipulate, among other things, the following:
(a) 
That the street shall conform to municipal specifications or that the owners of the private street shall include sufficient funds with the offer of dedication to restore the street to conformance with municipal specifications.
(b) 
That an offer to dedicate the street shall be made only for the street as a whole.
(c) 
That agreement by the owners of 51% of the front footage shall be binding on the owners of the remaining lots. Such condition shall be noted in the deeds for these properties.
E. 
Single-access streets. A street(s) which is served by only one intersection with a through street shall be considered a single-access street, regardless of the street's configuration within the proposed subdivision or land development. Single-access streets include cul-de-sac streets, multiple cul-de-sac streets and combinations of streets in a street network with a single access point of connection with a surrounding through street. Single-access streets shall comply with the following:
(1) 
Single-access streets shall be subject to the requirements for their classification of street, notwithstanding their single-access status.
(2) 
A maximum of 40 dwelling units or one commercial building or two industrial buildings may be located on a single-access street, subject to any further limitations required by Subsection E(1) above.
(3) 
Stub streets are single-access streets that are not required to provide a vehicular turnaround. A stub street shall not be longer than the depth of one building lot abutting the street or the width of two building lots abutting the street. Stub streets shall only be provided in appropriate locations for vehicular access to abutting undeveloped lands when authorized by the Board of Supervisors upon the advice of the Township Planning Commission and Engineer.
All streets in the Township shall be regulated according to their classification. Street classifications shall be in conformance with the Township's Ultimate Right-of-Way Ordinance and Map,[1] and with the requirements of § 123-30 of this chapter. All streets shall comply with the following:
A. 
Limited access:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 120 feet or more, as determined by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT).
(2) 
Cartway: as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT).
(3) 
Parking: not permitted.
B. 
Semicontrolled access, urban:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 80 feet.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 52 feet or as required by the appropriate authority having jurisdiction over the arterial.
(3) 
Parking: not permitted.
C. 
Semicontrolled access, rural:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 100 feet or as determined by the Board of Supervisors in compliance with § 123-87, Special situations, of Part 2.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 30 feet plus two ten-foot improved shoulders or as required by the appropriate authority having jurisdiction over the arterial.
(3) 
Parking: Not permitted; however, the Board of Supervisors may permit stopping for emergencies, deliveries and standing, when necessary.
D. 
Collectors:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 80 feet.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 30 feet, including two twelve-foot travel lanes plus two three-foot paved shoulders, and any additional pavement width needed for parking.
(3) 
Parking: permitted only when specifically provided for by the Board of Supervisors.
E. 
Feeders:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 60 feet.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 30 feet including two twelve-foot travel lanes plus two three-foot paved shoulders, and any additional pavement width needed for parking.
(3) 
Parking: may be permitted on one or both sides of the street.
F. 
Residential:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 50 feet.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 26 feet.
(3) 
Parking: no restrictions, unless problems arise or are anticipated in specific situations.
G. 
Cul-de-sac:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 50 feet, plus circular turnaround as required by § 123-30A.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 26 feet, except that culs-de-sac serving adjacent industrial properties shall have a minimum cartway of 42 feet when parking is permitted.
(3) 
Parking: may be permitted on one or both sides of the street. No parking shall be permitted in the circular turnaround.
H. 
Marginal access:
(1) 
Ultimate right-of-way: 40 feet.
(2) 
Minimum cartway width: 26 feet.
(3) 
Parking: permitted on one side only.
I. 
Street widths in excess of standard. The Board of Supervisors may require cartway widths in excess of the standards above for special situations, including the following:
(1) 
For parking, an additional eight feet of pavement on one or both sides of the street.
(2) 
Where necessary for additional lanes for traffic volume, additional street parking, turning movements, public safety and convenience.
J. 
Street shoulders. All streets constructed without curbs shall have shoulders stabilized to control drainage and erosion. The minimum shoulder widths shall be as follows:
(1) 
Limited access: as per the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
(2) 
Semicontrolled access, urban: 10 feet.
(3) 
Semicontrolled access, rural: 10 feet.
(4) 
Collectors: eight feet.
(5) 
Feeders: eight feet.
(6) 
Residential: six feet.
(7) 
Cul-de-sac: six feet.
(8) 
Marginal access: four feet.
K. 
Right-of-way dedication. The area between the existing right-of-way line and the ultimate right-of-way line shall be dedicated to the authority having jurisdiction over any public streets which abut or pass through any subdivision or land development proposed within the Township. All right-of-way dedications shall be in compliance with the Township Ultimate Right-of-Way Ordinance.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Part 2, Ultimate Rights-of-Way, of this chapter.
L. 
Right-of-way restrictions. No fences, hedges, trees, shrubbery, walls, plantings or other obstructions shall be located or permitted within the right-of-way, except for ground covers, such as grass, ivy, crown vetch or horizontally spreading walls necessitated by road widening and constructed by the authority having jurisdiction over the road.
M. 
Islands, medial strips and channelization may be required in any area where traffic volumes warrant their use for safety and efficiency and may be permitted in any area at the discretion of the Supervisors. Such devices on state roads must meet or exceed the requirements of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. The Board of Supervisors may require additional rights-of-way, upon the advice of the Township Engineer, when such devices are used.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Part 2, Ultimate Rights-of-Way, of this chapter.
[Amended 12-2-1999 by Ord. No. 442]
Unless otherwise directed by the Board of Supervisors, storm sewers and curbing shall be constructed along all existing streets and along both sides of all new interior streets of any new subdivisions and land developments within the Township. All commercial and multifamily parking areas and driveways shall have curbs where pavement edge and grass meet. Curbs at intersections shall be provided with depressions for wheelchair use. The size, type and construction standards for curbs and storm sewers shall be those specified in the Lower Providence Township Engineering Standards (Appendix A, Engineering Standards, Lower Providence Township).[1] All plans shall also comply with the applicable standards of the Township's Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance.[2]
A. 
Regardless of the small size of the subdivision or land development proposal, sidewalks, curbs and storm sewers shall be required wherever they fill a gap in an existing network.
B. 
If, for any reason, an interim waiver of these requirements is made, a sufficient guaranty shall be posted for the eventual installation of these items, subject to approval by the Supervisors, upon recommendation of the Township Engineer and Township Solicitor, in accordance with § 123-58H of this Part 1.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
[Amended 1-21-2016 by Ord. No. 630]
Sidewalks shall be installed along all existing or proposed public or private streets and common parking areas except when this requirement is waived at the discretion of the Board of Supervisors, upon recommendation of the Township Planning Commission and Engineer. Engineering design and construction standards shall be those contained in the Lower Providence Township Engineering Standards, Appendix A, Chapter 123, Subdivision and Land Development, as amended, and the ADA.
A. 
Sidewalks shall be located a minimum of five feet from the curbline or edge of cartway but shall not extend beyond the right-of-way line of public streets or equivalent right-of-way line of private streets.
B. 
Sidewalks shall be provided in appropriate locations to provide safe and efficient pedestrian access between parking areas and buildings.
C. 
Additional sidewalks shall be required where deemed necessary by the Supervisors to provide access to schools, churches, parks, community facilities and commercial or employment centers and to provide necessary pedestrian circulation within land development and/or subdivisions where otherwise required sidewalks would not be sufficient for public safety and convenience. Such additional sidewalks may be constructed of alternative materials, in compliance with the Lower Providence Township Engineering Standards.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
D. 
Sidewalks shall be designed to facilitate access and use by the handicapped in compliance with the Lower Providence Township Engineering Standards, Appendix A, Chapter 123, Subdivision and Land Development, as amended, and the ADA.
E. 
Driveway crossings shall be designed in compliance with § 123-36I herein and the Lower Providence Township Engineering Standards, Appendix A, Chapter 123, Subdivision and Land Development, as amended, and the ADA.
F. 
Sidewalks shall be designed in compliance with the Lower Providence Township Engineering Standards, Appendix A, Chapter 123, Subdivision and Land Development, as amended, and the ADA. Sidewalks shall be not less than five feet in width, unless otherwise permitted to be narrower under the ADA, and the supervisors may require additional width in commercial, industrial, office or higher density residential areas where higher volumes of pedestrian traffic are anticipated.
G. 
If for any reason an interim waiver of these requirements is made, a sufficient guaranty shall be posted for the eventual installation of these items, subject to approval by the Supervisors, upon recommendation of the Township Engineer and Solicitor, in accordance with § 123-58H of this Part 1.
All street intersections under the jurisdiction of Lower Providence Township shall be subject to the requirements of this section.
A. 
No more than two streets shall intersect at the same point.
B. 
Three-way and four-way intersections. Three-way or T intersections shall be used instead of four-way intersections unless the four-way intersection can be justified in terms of necessary and desirable through traffic movements or to avoid creating streets that are offset at less than the required distance.
C. 
Corrective changes to existing intersections. When existing streets intersect at odd angles or have more than four approaches, the applicant shall make corrective changes to bring the intersection into compliance with this Part 1, as required by the Supervisors, who shall first seek the advice of the Township Engineer and Planning Commission and other technical advisors and agencies, as appropriate. For state and county highways, corrective changes shall comply with the requirements of the appropriate agency.
D. 
Angle of intersections. All intersection approaches shall be designed at right angles whenever practicable. There shall be no intersections with primary or secondary arterials of less than 75% and there shall be no intersections of less than 60% for all other streets, measured at the center-line intersections.
E. 
Intersection spacing. Street intersections shall be spaced minimum distances apart as specified for the street classifications listed below, whether on the same or opposite side of the street. The minimum distance between intersections shall be measured along the higher classification intersecting street and shall be measured between the center lines of intersecting streets.
Type of Street
Spacing
(feet)
Urban semicontrolled access
6001
Rural semicontrolled access
1,2001
Collectors
6001
Feeders
400
Residential
200
All other streets
200
1 NOTE: Intersections may be spaced as close as 400 feet if necessary and/or preferable in terms of sight distance and accepted traffic safety standards.
F. 
Sight triangles. Proper sight lines, as provided by current regulations of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, shall be maintained at all intersections of streets. Clear sight triangles shall be maintained along all approaches to all intersections and shall be measured along street center lines, from their point of intersection, as listed below, for each lot:
Type of Street
Distance
(feet)
Semicontrolled access
1251
Collectors and feeders
1001
All other streets
751
1 NOTE: Where streets of differing classifications intersect, the dimension for the higher classification street shall be used.
G. 
Obstructions within sight triangles. Within the area of clear sight triangles, obstructions to visibility shall not be permitted within the following ranges of height:
(1) 
For primary and secondary arterials and streets serving industrial uses: from curb height to a minimum height of 12 feet.
(2) 
For nonarterial streets not serving industrial uses: from curb height to a minimum height of eight feet.
(3) 
Ground cover plants within the clear sight triangle area shall not exceed one foot in height.
(4) 
Grading within the clear sight triangle shall not exceed a six-percent difference measured from the elevation at any point along the top of the curb. Existing grades in excess of 6% shall be regraded into compliance.
(5) 
Exceptions may be made by the Supervisors to allow the location of the following items in the clear sight triangle:
(a) 
One private signpost, provided that the post does not exceed one foot square or one foot in diameter and that the sign itself is above the minimum height limit.
(b) 
One shade tree, provided that, as the tree matures, the lower branches will be kept pruned to the minimum height limit.
(c) 
Existing shade trees, provided that lower branches are kept pruned to the minimum height limit and that the size, number and arrangement of trees does not impede adequate visibility. The Supervisors may require removal of one or more trees if necessary to provide adequate visibility.
H. 
Radii of pavement and right-of-way at intersections. Road intersections shall be rounded with tangential arcs at pavement edge (curbline) and right-of-way lines as listed below. Where two roads of different right-of-way widths intersect, the radii of curvature for the widest road shall apply. The pavement edge (or curbline) radius and right-of-way radius shall be concentric.
Type of Road
Minimum Radius of Arc at Intersection of Pavement Edge or Curbline
(feet)
Minimum Radius of Arc at Intersection of Right-of-Way Line
(feet)
Urban or rural semicontrolled access
40 (or more as may
be required)
20
Collector
30
20
Feeder
30
20
Residential
25
15
Rural
25
15
All other streets
25
15
Sight distance, horizontal and vertical curvature and maximum and minimum street grades shall be provided on all streets in compliance with the standards contained in this section.
A. 
Sight distance. Proper sight distance shall be provided with respect to both horizontal and vertical alignments, measured along the center line of the street, at the driver's eye height of 3 1/2 feet, as follows:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
Type of Road
Distance
(feet)
Urban semicontrolled access
500
Rural semicontrolled access
800
Collector
500
Feeder
400
Residential
300
Rural
300
All other streets
200
B. 
Horizontal curvature. Horizontal curves shall be used at all changes in direction in excess of two degrees and shall consider distance, change in grade and alignment. The following standards shall be used:
(1) 
Minimum curve radius at center line.
(a) 
Semicontrolled access: 300 feet.
(b) 
Collectors and feeders: 200 feet.
(c) 
All other streets: 150 feet.
(2) 
Curves and tangents.
(a) 
Long radius curves shall be used rather than a series of shorter radius curves connected by tangents.
(b) 
Reverse curves shall be separated and connected by a tangent of a minimum length of 100 feet, except for local access streets.
(c) 
Curve-tangent relationships shall follow accepted engineering guidelines for safety and efficiency. For example, minimum radius curves shall not be used at the ends of long tangents.
(3) 
Superelevation. Primary and secondary streets shall be superelevated in compliance with accepted engineering standards when a curve radius of less than 600 feet is used.
(4) 
Approaches to intersections. Approaches to intersections shall follow a straight course for a minimum of 100 feet for local access streets. All other streets shall follow a straight course in accordance with accepted engineering standards but in no case less than 100 feet.
C. 
Vertical curvature. Vertical curves shall be used at changes in grades of more than 1%, in compliance with the following requirements:
(1) 
Curve length shall approximate the following for each change of 1%.
(a) 
Primary arterials: 250 feet or as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
(b) 
Collectors and feeders: 50 feet.
(c) 
All other streets: 25 feet.
(2) 
The high point or low point on a vertical curve shall be clearly identified on plans and profiles, as appropriate.
(3) 
Over summits or in sumps, vertical curves shall not produce excessive flatness in grade.
D. 
Street grades. All streets shall be graded as shown on the street profile and cross-section plans submitted and approved as a part of the preliminary plan approval process for subdivision and/or land development. Street grades shall comply with the following:
(1) 
Minimum grade for all streets shall be 1%.
(2) 
Maximum grade for streets shall be:
(a) 
Semicontrolled access: 7%.
(b) 
Collectors and feeders: 7%.
(c) 
All other streets: 10% for distances of not more than 1,500 feet.
(3) 
Street grades in excess of 5% should be avoided wherever possible.
(4) 
Street grades shall be measured along the center line.
(5) 
Curve-grade combinations shall follow accepted engineering guidelines for safety and efficiency. For example, minimum-radius horizontal curves will not be permitted in combination with maximum grades.
(6) 
At all approaches to intersections, street grades shall not exceed 3% for a minimum distance of 50 feet.
(7) 
The grade of the outer perimeter of a cul-de-sac turnaround shall not exceed 4%, measured along the curbline.
(8) 
All street grading shall be checked for accuracy under inspection by the Township Engineer.
(9) 
A maximum grade within any intersection shall not exceed 3%.
The requirements for driveways shall be the standards of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation regarding access to and occupancy of highways by driveways and local roads (Pennsylvania Code, Title 67, Chapter 441, as amended). Driveway access to state highways shall be subject to the permit process of that Department. Driveway access to Township roads shall be subject to the Township's permit process. All driveways shall be subject to the standards, requirements and processing of this section.
A. 
Location.
(1) 
Driveways shall be so located as to provide adequate sight distance at intersections with streets.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(2) 
Driveways shall be located in a manner which will not cause the following:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384; 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
(a) 
Interference to the traveling public;
(b) 
A hazard to the free movement of normal highway traffic;
(c) 
Areas of undue traffic congestion on the highway; or
(d) 
Be closer than five feet from any property line.
(3) 
Driveways shall be located, designed and constructed in such a manner as not to interfere with or be inconsistent with the design, maintenance and drainage of the highway.
B. 
Criteria for review. The Board of Supervisors shall use the following criteria to guide it in determining driveway access to feeder and higher classification roads. The Supervisors may use more restrictive criteria when required.
(1) 
Driveway accesses shall be at least 200 feet apart. Driveways shall be located to provide the greatest possible sight distance in accordance with PennDOT standards.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(2) 
No more than five lots may have direct access to a feeder and higher classification road. All the road frontage shall be considered a part of this requirement for lands held in single ownership.
(3) 
Alternates to be considered for larger subdivisions shall be as follows, subject to the approval of the Township Board of Supervisors upon recommendation of the Planning Commission:
(a) 
Reverse frontage interior roads shall be provided, to be built according to standards for subdivision roads.
(b) 
Marginal access roads shall be provided, as per § 123-30B.
C. 
Distance from street intersection. Driveways shall be located as far from street intersections as is reasonably possible but not less than the following distances:
(1) 
Individual residential lots: 50 feet.
(2) 
Multifamily residential and nonresidential lots: 100 feet.
D. 
Number of driveways. All residential properties shall be limited to one curb cut. The following standards shall apply to nonresidential properties:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(1) 
Properties with frontages of 100 feet or less shall be limited to one curb cut.
(2) 
Not more than two curb cuts may be permitted for any single property, tract or lot for each street frontage.
(3) 
More than two curb cuts per street frontage may be permitted only if anticipated traffic volumes warrant more than two and when supported by a traffic study prepared by a qualified traffic engineer.
E. 
Choice of streets. When streets of different classes are involved, the driveway shall provide access to the street of lesser classification.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
F. 
Pavement widths and grade. Driveway paving widths and grades shall be as follows:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
Land Use
Minimum Paving Width
(feet)
Maximum Paving Width
(feet)
Minimum Radius at Curb
(feet)
Maximum Grade
Single-family residential
10
20
5
12%
Multifamily residential
One-way
12
15
10
9%
Two-way
24
28
10
9%
Commercial and industrial (two-way)1
Low volume
20
24
15
7%
Medium volume
28
28
15
7%
High volume
PennDOT standards shall be used
NOTE:
1See § 123-37M(2) for driveway classifications. A one-way driveway may be reduced to half the width of the two-way driveway.
G. 
Stopping areas. Regardless of the driveway classification, all driveways shall be provided with a stopping area within which the grade shall not exceed 6%. The stopping area shall be measured as follows:
(1) 
The length of stopping area shall be a minimum of 20 feet or the length of the longest vehicle anticipated to use the driveway, whichever is greater.
(2) 
Stopping areas shall be measured from the ultimate right-of-way line for arterial streets and from the edge of paving or curbline of local access streets.
H. 
Clear sight triangles. Clear sight triangles shall be provided where driveways intersect streets, in compliance with the standards of § 123-34F and G. The dimensional standards shall be determined by the classification of street which the driveway intersects.
I. 
Paving requirements and drainage. All driveways shall comply with the paving, drainage and stormwater runoff provisions of the Lower Providence Engineering Standards[1] and shall be approved by the Township Engineer.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, included at the end of this chapter.
J. 
No driveway location, classification or design shall be considered finally approved until permits have been granted by the state and/or Township and preliminary plan approval has been granted by the Board of Supervisors for the subdivision and/or land development which the driveway(s) will serve.
K. 
No building permit shall be issued nor shall any occupancy permit be issued as to any improvement or improvements in any district in this Township until the application for a driveway permit shall have been made in writing and a permit approved by the Township authorities or other authority which may have jurisdiction over the road.
A. 
Off-street automobile parking facilities shall be provided for all uses of land, structures and buildings, as well as for any expansion of such uses or increase in the intensity of use in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 143, Zoning,  and this Part 1.
B. 
Angled or perpendicular parking shall not be permitted along public or private streets, except where specifically permitted by this Part 1 or other ordinances. No parking areas shall be located within a public street right-of-way. Parked vehicles in off-street parking spaces shall be prevented from intruding on travel lanes, walkways, public streets or adjacent properties by means of walls, curbs, wheel stops or other appropriate means.
C. 
No more than 18 parking spaces may be located in an uninterrupted row. If more than 18 parking spaces are located in a row, a raised and curbed planted area with a minimum size of nine feet by 18 feet shall be located at appropriate intervals to provide shading and visual interest. Each planted island or required planted area shall contain a shade tree of at least a caliper of 2 1/2 inches. Curbed parking islands must be provided at the ends of rows of parking. All parking islands must be a minimum of 10 feet in width.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384; 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
D. 
Parking shall not be permitted along driveways which serve as the main entrances or exit(s) to parking areas with a capacity of 100 cars or more.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
E. 
Parking areas shall not be located closer than 20 feet from any property boundary line nor less than 20 feet from any ultimate right-of-way line nor less than 10 feet from three sides of any building, unless greater setbacks are prescribed by the Township's Zoning Ordinance.[1] The areas not abutting a building shall be landscaped according to the requirements of Subsection L, and the areas where the setback is required from the buildings shall be used for walkways and foundation planting.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384; 7-15-1999 by Ord. No. 434]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 143, Zoning.
F. 
Where the edge of a parking area is located close to a street, driveway or other parking area and the provisions of Subsection E above do not apply, a minimum separation of 10 feet shall be provided between these features, unless a greater setback is prescribed by the Township's Zoning Ordinance.[2] This spacing shall consist of a raised landscaped area, preferably curbed, with planting in conformance with Subsection L.
[Amended 7-15-1999 by Ord. No. 434]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 143, Zoning.
G. 
Parking spaces shall be a minimum of nine feet by 18 feet, except that a minimum of 8 1/2 by 18 feet by 18 feet may be used for controlled (valet parking, directed parking) or for long-term parking areas for multifamily residential, office, industrial and institutional uses. In addition, up to 20% of the parking area for more than 100 vehicles may be reduced to eight feet by 17 feet for compact cars, provided that the smaller spaces are clearly designated as compact car space.
H. 
Parking spaces shall be paved according to the Lower Providence Engineering Standards.[3] Impervious coverage shall be reduced to the maximum extent possible by the use of the following methods:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(1) 
Parking reserve areas. Where appropriate, portions of the required parking area shall remain as open space until needed, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 143, Zoning.
(2) 
Reduced parking stall length. The parking stall length may be reduced 15%, provided that the additional length is added to the adjacent green area and tire bumpers are used to control the location of parked vehicles.
(3) 
Porous paved material. Porous paving materials may be used, such as in overflow or temporary parking areas, when approved by the Board of Supervisors, upon the recommendation of the Township Engineer.
[3]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, included at the end of this chapter.
I. 
In any residential parking area where rows of parking spaces are parallel to one another and not separated by a driveway, a raised and/or curbed planting strip shall be provided between the rows. Said strip shall have a minimum width of at least 10 feet, planted in accordance with Subsection L and § 123-50.
J. 
In any residential parking area where a single row of parking spaces is located between two driveways, a raised and/or curbed planting strip shall be provided between the row of parking spaces and one driveway. Said strip shall have a minimum width of 10 feet, planted in accordance with Subsection L and § 123-50.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
K. 
Dead-ended parking areas shall be discouraged when the required parking capacity can be accommodated in a layout that permits more convenient vehicular movements. However, extraneous through traffic flow should be avoided.
(1) 
Up to 50 parking spaces may also be located in a dead-ended parking area if there is no more desirable alternative feasible and sufficient backup area is provided for the end stalls.
(2) 
More than 50 parking spaces may be located in a dead-ended parking area only if a turnaround area is provided at the closed end, suitable for passenger car turning. The turnaround area may be circular, T- or Y-shaped or other configuration acceptable to the Board of Supervisors.
L. 
Parking lot landscaping.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(1) 
Parking areas shall be landscaped for the purposes below:
(a) 
To add visual character and improve the appearance of large parking areas by reducing massive expanses of uninterrupted pavement.
(b) 
To provide shade for parked cars.
(c) 
To reduce random vehicular flow across parking areas.
(d) 
To reduce runoff by reducing impervious surface areas.
(2) 
To achieve the purposes above, parking lot landscaping shall be required in accordance with the following standards for all parking areas for between 50 and 150 vehicles:
(a) 
Facing rows of parking stalls shall be separated by a planting strip a minimum of eight feet in width for the entire length of the parking rows.
(b) 
Parking areas shall be separated from internal collector drives by a landscaped area at least 10 feet in width.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
(c) 
The minimum size of planting strips within parking areas shall be 200 square feet with a minimum horizontal dimension of 10 feet.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
(d) 
Impervious coverage shall be reduced to the maximum extent possible by the use of the following:
[1] 
Parking reserve areas. Where appropriate, portions of the required parking area shall remain as open space until needed, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 143, Zoning.
[2] 
Reduced parking stall length. The parking stall length may be reduced by 15%, provided that the additional length is added to the adjacent green area and tire bumpers are used to control the location of parked vehicles.
[3] 
Porous paving material. Porous paving materials may be used, such as in overflow or temporary parking areas, when approved by the Board of Supervisors, upon the recommendation of the Township Engineer.
(3) 
Parking areas for over 150 cars for nonresidential purposes shall be divided into sections by landscaped planting strips a minimum of 10 feet wide, in compliance with the following:
(a) 
These planting strips shall be located as follows:
[1] 
To separate main access (entrance-exit driveways) from rows of parking spaces.
[2] 
To separate other major driveways from rows of parking spaces (service drives, general internal circulation).
[3] 
To separate large parking areas into smaller units at intervals of four rows of parking stalls with each unit capacity not greater than 100 cars.
(b) 
These planting strips shall be raised islands, curbed, in order to provide a more suitable planting environment.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
(c) 
A pedestrian crossover of paving blocks must be provided for all planting strips within a parking lot of at least five feet in width. All outdoor cart corrals must be covered and clearly marked in the parking lot, and an indoor cart storage must be installed in front of the retail establishment if carts are provided by the retailer. A minimum of four outdoor cart corrals must be provided for retail uses in which carts are utilized. Parking shall be prohibited on all parking islands.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
(d) 
For parking areas with an ultimate capacity greater than 500 cars, the requirements of Subsection L(3)(c), above may be modified to provide separation into units at intervals of six rows or parking stalls, with each unit capacity not greater than 150 cars.
(4) 
Landscaping design standards. The following standards apply to all parking lot landscaping:
(a) 
The primary plant materials shall be shade or canopy trees, drawn from the list in Appendix B.[4] The applicant may select alternative trees, chosen for their ability to tolerate the adverse environment of parking lots, their appearance and shade-providing qualities, and low maintenance characteristics. Any alternative plant materials must be approved by the Township Landscape Architect or Township Zoning Officer.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
[1] 
These trees shall be planted in the planting strips a minimum of 30 feet and a maximum of 40 feet apart. Each landscaped island shall contain at least one canopy tree.
[2] 
The minimum size of trees when planted shall be between five feet to eight feet in height and a caliper of 2 1/2 inches for shade trees and eight feet in height for evergreens.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
[4]
Editor's Note: Appendix B is included at the end of this chapter.
(5) 
Additional planting is encouraged and may include a variety of ornamental trees, shrubs and ground covers, provided that:
(a) 
At the ends of planting strips at driveway intersections, drivers' visibility shall be maintained by limited planting for the end 35 feet.
(b) 
At the ends of planting strips between rows of parking spaces, visibility shall be maintained by limited planting for the end 20 feet.
(c) 
Limited planting shall mean:
[1] 
Not more than one shade or canopy tree within the area.
[2] 
No shrubs or ground cover plants exceeding two feet in height.
[3] 
No evergreen trees.
(d) 
Any parking lot plantings may be used to satisfy the requirements of § 123-50A herein.
M. 
The following requirements apply to driveways within sites proposed for developments:
(1) 
A smooth transition shall be provided between the driveway section required for access to a public street and the driveway(s) required for interval site circulation.
(2) 
Main access driveways (entrance-exit), shall be classified as follows:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(a) 
Low-volume driveways are those that carry less than 750 vehicles per day (for example, an office building or an elementary school). Minimum width shall be 24 feet for a two-way driveway.
(b) 
Medium-volume driveways carry from 750 to 1,500 vehicles per day (for example, a motel, fast-food restaurant or small shopping center). Minimum width shall be 28 feet or 14 feet per lane.
(c) 
High-volume driveways carry more than 1,500 vehicles per day and usually require a signalized intersection (for example, a large shopping center or office park). Minimum width shall be according to the standards of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (Title 67 of the Pennsylvania Code, as amended).
(3) 
Access driveways which are clearly secondary in importance may be reduced to 24 feet in paved width.
(4) 
All internal circulation driveways shall be a minimum of 22 feet wide with two-way traffic flow for convenience and efficiency and shall be signed for no parking.
(5) 
(Reserved)[5]
[5]
Editor's Note: Former Subsection M(5) was deleted 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384.
(6) 
One-way driveways and/or parking at less than right angles may be permitted only when:
(a) 
Right-angled parking and two-way driveways are not feasible because of site characteristics; or
(b) 
Proven by the applicant to be superior for the particular development proposal.
(7) 
Wherever feasible, internal circulation driveways shall extend from access drives in locations which permit and encourage entering traffic to turn and enter the parking aisles without first traveling along a building-front driveway. This feature is intended to reduce the volume of vehicular traffic along building-front drives to make it safer for pedestrian traffic.
N. 
No less than a five-foot radius of curvature shall be permitted for all curblines in all parking areas.
O. 
Parking lot dimensions shall be no less than those listed in the following table. All parking spaces shall be marked with all-weather paint with double parallel lines to be a minimum of six inches apart to separate each space.
Parking Stall
Angle of Parking
(degrees)
Depth
(feet)
Width
(feet)
Aisle Width One-Way
(feet)
Two-Way
(feet)
90
18*
9*
22
22
60
21
10
18
20
45
19
10
18
18
NOTES:
*
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
P. 
Off-street loading areas. In addition to off-street parking areas, off-street loading areas shall be provided for all retail businesses and wholesale and industrial uses requiring the regular delivering or shipping of goods, merchandise or equipment to the site by semitrailer truck. All loading space shall be located on the same lot as the principal use(s) it serves. Off-street loading areas shall comply with the following:
(1) 
Required loading space shall be available for the loading and unloading of vehicles and shall not be used for the storage of vehicles or materials or to meet off-street parking requirements or in conducting the use.
(2) 
The location and size of loading areas shall be adequate for the safe parking of trucks, and maneuvering space shall be provided so that ingress and egress can be accomplished on the lot without backing into a public street.
(3) 
The loading spaces shall be compatible with vehicular circulation in adjacent areas based upon its location and the schedule of its use.
(4) 
Two or more establishments may use a common loading and unloading facility, upon approval of the Board of Supervisors and upon the recommendation of the Township Engineer and/or Planning Commission.
(5) 
In the case of shopping centers and other large scale uses having frequent truck deliveries or pickups, the circulation pattern for service vehicles shall be physically separated from automobile parking areas and parking access driveways.
Q. 
Handicapped parking.
(1) 
All multifamily, commercial, office, public and industrial uses shall provide parking spaces for the physically handicapped. The minimum number of handicapped spaces, as part of their parking requirements, shall be as follows:
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
Total Parking Spaces
Handicapped Parking Spaces
1 to 10
*
11 to 25
1
26 to 50
2
51 to 75
3
76 to 100
4
101 to 150
5
151 to 200
6
201 to 300
7
301 to 400
8
401 to 500
9
501 and up
2% of total spaces
NOTE:
*For parking lots of 10 spaces or less, one oversized space shall be provided, as per Subsection B, and a ramp shall be provided, as per Subsection C. However, the oversized space need not be marked as a handicapped space and may be used by the general public.
(2) 
Required off-street parking spaces for the physically handicapped shall be a minimum of 12 feet wide by 18 feet long and shall be paved with an impervious gravel-free surface. Side-by-side spaces are encouraged to be marked as 1 1/2 times the standard width.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(3) 
Parking spaces for the physically handicapped should generally be located on the shortest possible route to an accessible entrance to the building. The first parking space in rows of parking near such entrances may be reserved for handicapped parking. Ramps shall be provided for convenient access from parking spaces to accessible entrances and to sidewalks. Such spaces shall be placed to permit severely handicapped persons to get into and out of a vehicle from either side.
(4) 
The pavement shall be marked with the international symbol of accessibility. An aboveground sign shall be clearly visible from the driveway to designate each physically handicapped parking space with the appropriate signage indicating the penalty for violation according to Pennsylvania standards.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
R. 
Flexibility. The Board of Supervisors, upon the recommendation of the Township Planning Commission and Engineer, may approve alternative designs or layouts for parking areas and/or loading areas that are inconsistent with the requirements of this section, provided that:
(1) 
The alternative design will not reduce the overall area for planting strips or the landscaping requirements.
(2) 
The layout reduces the random flow of vehicles across parking areas more than the provisions of this section.
(3) 
The proposed design separates the major driveways from rows of parking spaces, as required above.
A. 
General. The length, width and shape of blocks shall be determined with due regard to:
(1) 
Provision of adequate sites for buildings of the type proposed.
(2) 
Zoning requirements.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 143, Zoning.
(3) 
Topography.
(4) 
Requirements for safe and convenient vehicular and pedestrian circulation, including the reduction of intersections with primary arterials.
B. 
Size. Block length and width or acreage within bounding roads shall be such as to accommodate the size of lot required in the area by Chapter 143, Zoning, and to provide for convenient access, circulation control and vehicular and pedestrian safety. Whenever practicable, blocks shall be of such width as to provide two tiers of lots of the minimum size permitted under the applicable zoning classification.
C. 
Through lots. Double frontage lots are to be avoided and generally will not be permitted, except where reversed frontage is desired away from a major thoroughfare to a street of lesser traffic volume.
D. 
Commercial and industrial blocks. For commercial or industrial use, the block size shall be sufficient in the judgment of the Board of Supervisors to meet all area and yard requirements for such use. Adequate provision shall be made for off-street parking and loading areas, as well as for the flow of pedestrian and vehicular traffic, so as not to inhibit the flow of such traffic on public rights-of-way.
A. 
Area. All lots shall be no smaller than the minimum lot area requirements of the applicable zoning classifications.
B. 
Depth. Lots which are excessively deep in relation to width are be avoided. A proportion of 2 1/2 to 1 is generally regarded as the desirable maximum for lots 60 feet or more in width unless a deeper lot is warranted because of previously existing man-made or natural constraints.
C. 
Width. The minimum width of a lot shall be that width which is measured at the building line in feet, specified for the applicable zoning district.
D. 
Corner lots. All corner lots shall be of sufficient size to comply with all yard requirements of the applicable zoning district.
E. 
Frontage. The frontage shall not be less than the minimum requirements of the applicable zoning district.
F. 
Side lines. The side lines of a lot shall be set at right angles or radial to the right-of-way line, so far as is practical, except that side lines are generally encouraged to run north-south in order to encourage structures to be sited with a southern exposure to permit the utilization of solar energy.
G. 
Building lines. Building lines for all lots shall be in conformance with the minimum front, side and rear yard requirements of the applicable zoning district.
H. 
Lot numbers. For the purpose of development, each subdivision may have an overall system of lot numbers, the number one being assigned to a lot in the first section to be developed.
I. 
Rear lots (defined by the Lower Providence Township Zoning Code as "interior lot"). A rear lot may be permitted, subject to the following criteria:
(1) 
Farmland, wood or other environmental amenities, if any, shall be preserved as a result of locating building lots away from existing roads.
(2) 
Access strips shall be located so as to serve as logical sites for future roads, in the event of future resubdivision, and are reserved for such purpose by a note on the final plan and in the deed for the lot.
(3) 
Design standards.
(a) 
General. A rear lot shall be connected to a public street by an access strip held in fee simple ownership as part of the rear lot.
(b) 
Dimensions. Access strips shall be 25 feet wide, shall not exceed a vertical grade of 10% and should contain no horizontal turn greater than 45°, where practical.
(c) 
Layout. The area of the access strip shall not be counted toward the minimum lot area requirement.
(d) 
Common access and driveways. A street frontage lot abutting an access strip may share the common access point or driveway of the rear lot, provided that the Township Solicitor approves any easements or maintenance agreements related to such common access or driveway.
(e) 
Location. The location of the access strip must, in the opinion of the Township Board of Supervisors, be deemed logical and proper relative to the bulk of the rear lot and surrounding property configurations, upon the advice of the Township Engineer, and shall not, in its opinion, adversely affect sensitive or significant environmental features.
(f) 
Use of rear lots. Rear lots shall not be utilized as a means of avoiding the construction of public roads.
(g) 
Number of lots. No more than one rear lot shall be permitted per subdivision.
(h) 
The driveway serving a rear lot shall be paved and provide a minimum of 12 feet in width and shall provide a vertical clearance of not less than 13 feet six inches. If the driveway for a rear lot also serves as the driveway for a street frontage lot, the driveway width shall be 20 feet.
(i) 
A rear lot shall be provided with public water and sanitary sewer.
(j) 
A rear lot shall provide a lot area of 200% of the minimum established for the individual district and shall not include the area located in the access strip.
(k) 
A rear lot shall provide a building envelope setback from all front, side and rear property lines equal to the front yard and setback dimensions required by the individual zoning district.
Proposals with existing buildings. No proposal will be approved with a property line extending through any portion of an existing building, except where that property line follows a party wall separating semidetached or attached units, in accordance with Chapter 143, Zoning, or when an existing building is to be demolished, as noted on the applicant's plan.
A. 
When existing buildings are retained:
(1) 
Minimum building setbacks shall be met or exceeded, in respect to all new lot lines created, for the district in which the buildings are located, even if this results in a lot area or dimensions in excess of the otherwise applicable minimums.
(2) 
Building setbacks in excess of the applicable minimums are encouraged, in respect to all new lot lines created, when the height and/or bulk of the existing building significantly exceeds that of proposed, abutting development. For tall buildings, a setback equal to the height of the building is suggested as a minimum. For proportionally wide or deep buildings, a setback equal to 1/2 the width or depth of the building is suggested as a minimum.
(3) 
Run-down buildings shall be rehabilitated on the exterior to conform in quality to surrounding new development.
(4) 
Structurally deficient buildings shall be rehabilitated in conformance with the Township's Building Code[1] and the ICC Property Maintenance Code.
[Amended 9-21-2006 by Ord. No. 555]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 67, Building Construction.
(5) 
Additions to retained buildings shall conform in all respects to the requirements of Chapter 143, Zoning, which is applicable to the district in which the building is located and shall be in harmony with the character, design, building materials and other architectural features of the building.
(6) 
Historical or culturally significant buildings shall retain their respective characters, to the greatest extent practical.
(7) 
New buildings abutting the retained building should reflect the character and architectural features of the retained building, to the greatest extent practical.
(8) 
In nonresidential districts, retained buildings shall be provided with adequate parking, service and landscaped areas in accordance with Chapter 143, Zoning, provisions for the intended use. If the applicant cannot specify the intended use, then the most land-consumptive provisions shall be applied, to ensure sufficient land area for uses permitted in that district.
(9) 
The building setback lines, existing and proposed buildings, driveways, parking areas, walks and other similar information shall be shown on the plan, with a note added describing the buildings and their intended purposes.
(10) 
No plan approval will be granted to a subdivision or a land development unless and until the above requirements are complied with to the satisfaction of the Township Supervisors, upon recommendation of the Township Planning Commission and Engineer.
B. 
When existing buildings will be removed:
(1) 
The plan must show the location and include a brief description of the building(s) to be removed.
(2) 
Plan approval will be granted upon written agreement to the expeditious removal of buildings intended for removal, in conformance with applicable Township requirements and procedures regarding demolition of buildings and disposition of the reusable parts and/or disposal of the rubble. If the building will not be removed immediately, a financial guaranty must be posted for its removal, in compliance with § 123-58 herein.
A. 
Reserve strips created by the placement of a new road close to but not on the boundary to an adjacent property are prohibited.
B. 
Rights-of-way and/or easements for sanitary sewer, road construction or maintenance, drainage purposes, public utilities or for any specific purpose shall be required by the Board of Supervisors as needed. The location and width in each case shall be determined by the Board of Supervisors.
(1) 
Buildings shall be set back five feet from the nearest side of the utility right-of-way or easement to the proposed building.
(2) 
Nothing shall be placed, planted, set or put within the areas of an easement, and the area shall be kept as a lawn.
(3) 
The owner of any lot, upon written request by the Township and at the owner's sole expense, shall remove anything placed, planted, set or put, with or without knowledge of this Part 1, within the area of any easement.
(4) 
To the fullest extent possible, easements shall be adjacent to rear or side lot lines.
C. 
No right-of-way nor easement for any purpose whatsoever shall be recited or described in any deed unless the same has been shown on the approved plan. Any error found in a deed shall be immediately corrected and rerecorded at the sole expense of the subdivider at the Montgomery County office of the Recorder of Deeds in Norristown, Pennsylvania.
D. 
Utility easements. A minimum width of 20 feet shall be provided for common utilities and drainage when provided in undedicated land. Nothing shall be placed, planted, set or put within the area of an easement, and the area shall be maintained as a lawn. An additional width of 10 feet shall be added to the easement width for each additional utility placed in the common easement.
E. 
Drainage easements.
(1) 
Drainage easements shall be required along natural watercourses coinciding with the extent of the one-hundred-year floodplain but in no case less than 50 feet in total width. The easement shall be adequate to preserve natural drainage as determined by the Township Engineer and/or as required by the Department of Environmental Protection. The owner shall properly grade and seed slopes and fence any open ditches as required by the Township.
(2) 
Permanent drainage easements for man-made facilities and swales shall be a minimum of 25 feet in width and may be used for storm and sanitary sewers and as open space.
F. 
Dedication. Where stormwater or surface water will be gathered within the subdivision or land development and discharged or drained in volume over lands within or beyond the boundaries of the subdivision or land development, the subdivider, developer or builder shall reserve or obtain easements over all lands affected. The easements shall be adequate for such discharge of drainage and for carrying off of such water and for the maintenance, repair and reconstruction of the same, including the right of passage over by vehicles, machinery and other equipment for such passage and work. The subdivider, developer or builder shall offer for dedication, at no cost, the easements to the Township.
G. 
Describing easements or rights-of-way. Any easements and/or rights-of-way approved by the Township under this Part 1 shall be described on the deed of each lot in a subdivision or land development affected by such easements and/or rights-of-way and shall be recorded at the sole expense of the subdivider, developer or builder at the Montgomery County office of the Recorder of Deeds in Norristown, Pennsylvania. The recording of these restrictions on the deeds for each parcel is required to ensure that any future purchaser of the property is fully informed of the existence of any easements and/or rights-of-way on the parcel.
All permanent and temporary cutting, filling, grading, regrading and/ or other forms of earthmoving activities shall be in compliance with the requirements of the Lower Providence Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance.[1] All grading plans must be submitted to and approved by the Township Engineer. The following requirements shall also be met:
A. 
Grading shall not be started until the stormwater and erosion control plan is approved by the Township Engineer.
B. 
All grading shall be done in conformance with an approved stormwater and erosion control plan.
C. 
Grading permit required. No person shall commence or perform any grading, excavation, fill or topsoil removal of vegetative cover without first having obtained a grading permit from the Township Zoning Officer upon the recommendation of the Township Engineer, in accordance with the Lower Providence Township Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
D. 
Periodic inspections of the site during construction shall be conducted by the Township Building Inspector and the Township Engineer, and any observed violations of this Part 1 shall be cause for immediate issuance of an order to cease construction activity until such conditions are corrected.
E. 
The stormwater and erosion control plan, which includes all plans for grading, shall be recorded at the sole expense of the developer at the Montgomery County office of the Recorder of Deeds in Norristown, Pennsylvania, for the protection of future owners of the property or lots in the development.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
A. 
The management of stormwater on the site, both during and after completion of the land disturbances associated with the proposed subdivision or land development, shall comply with the standards and requirements of the Township Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance.[1] The design of any temporary or permanent facilities and structures and the utilization of any natural drainage systems shall be in full compliance with the terms of that ordinance and the interpretations of the Township Engineer.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
B. 
When an application for a building permit is filed for any land development or any lot created by a subdivision under this Part 1, the building permit shall be conditioned upon consistency with the approved stormwater and erosion control plan for the entire tract.
A. 
Those areas defined as floodplains by the Floodplain Conservation District of the Township Zoning Ordinance shall be subject to the requirements and restrictions contained in Chapter 143, Zoning, and the following additional regulations which are intended to conform to the requirements of Section 1910.3d of the National Flood Insurance Program, P.L. 93-234. It is the purpose of these regulations to:
(1) 
Regulate the subdivision and development of flood-prone land areas in order to promote the general health, welfare and safety of the community.
(2) 
Require that each subdivision lot or development site in flood-prone areas be provided with a safe building site with adequate access and that public facilities which serve such sites be designed and installed to preclude flood damage at the time of initial construction.
(3) 
Protect individuals from buying lands which are unsuitable for use because of flood hazards by prohibiting the subdivision and development of unprotected flood-prone areas.
(4) 
Maintain the certification of Lower Providence Township and the eligibility of the property owners in Lower Providence Township for the benefits of the National Flood Insurance Program, P.L 93-234.
B. 
Preapplication procedures for subdivision and land developments. Prospective developers shall consult the Montgomery County Conservation District representative concerning erosion and sediment control measures, the effort of geologic conditions on the proposed subdivision and land development and the potential impact of the proposed subdivision and land development on geologic conditions.
C. 
The following requirements shall apply for all subdivision and land developments proposed in Lower Providence Township:
(1) 
Where not prohibited by this Part 1 or any other codes or ordinances, land located in flood-prone area(s) may be subdivided or developed with the provision that the developer construct all buildings and structures to preclude flood damage in accordance with this Part 1 and any other codes or ordinances regulating such development.
(2) 
The Board of Supervisors may, when it is deemed necessary for the health, comfort, safety or welfare of the present and future population of the area and necessary to the conservation of water, drainage and sanitary facilities, prohibit subdivision of any portion of the property which lies within the floodplain of any stream or drainage course.
(3) 
No subdivision or land development shall be approved if the proposed development or improvements will, individually or collectively, increase the established flood level or regulatory flood elevation (where applicable) more than one foot on the subject property or on any upstream or downstream property.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
(4) 
If the Board of Supervisors determines that only a portion of a proposed plan can be safely developed, it shall limit development to that part and shall require that development proceed consistent with this determination.
(5) 
When a developer does not intend to develop the plan himself and the Board of Supervisors determines that additional controls are required to ensure safe development, it may require the developer to impose appropriate deed restrictions on the land. Such deed restrictions shall be inserted in every deed and noted on the record plan.
D. 
Where any excavation or grading is proposed or where any existing trees, shrubs or other vegetative cover will be removed, the developer shall abide by the regulations in the Township's Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
E. 
Storm drainage facilities shall be designed to convey the flow of surface waters without risk to persons or property. The drainage system shall ensure drainage at all points along streets and ensure conveyance of drainage away from buildings and on-site waste disposal sites.
F. 
The Board of Supervisors may require an underground system to accommodate frequent floods and a secondary surface system to accommodate larger, less frequent floods. Drainage plans shall be consistent with local and regional drainage plans. The facilities shall be designed to prevent the discharge of excess runoff onto adjacent properties.
G. 
Any development which creates a significant change in the characteristics of the watershed, thus increasing volume and velocity of surface water runoff, due to the decrease in retention and infiltration of stormwater, shall not be permitted until guaranties are made of improvements that will reduce the likelihood of erosion, sedimentation, inundation and water drainage from peak periods of precipitation and that provide for controlled disposal of excess surface water. Such improvements must satisfy the requirements and regulations of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureaus of Water Quality Management and Dams and Encroachments.
H. 
When approved as a conditional use, the finished elevation of proposed streets shall be no more than two feet below the regulatory flood elevation, where available. Drainage openings shall be sufficient to discharge flood flows without unduly increasing flood heights.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
I. 
(Reserved)[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: Former Subsection I was deleted 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384.
J. 
All sanitary sewer systems located in flood-prone areas, whether public or private, shall be floodproofed up to a point 1 1/2 feet above the regulatory flood elevation, where available.
(1) 
The Board of Supervisors may prohibit installation of sewage disposal facilities requiring soil absorption systems where such systems will not function due to high groundwater, flooding or unsuitable soil characteristics. The Board of Supervisors may require that the developer note on the plan and in any deed of conveyance that on-site sewage disposal systems are prohibited in designated flood-prone areas.
(2) 
The Board of Supervisors may prescribe adequate methods for waste disposal. If a public sanitary sewer system is located within or near the proposed subdivision or land development, the Board of Supervisors shall require the developer to connect to this system, where practical, and shall prescribe the procedures to be followed by the developer in connecting to said system.
K. 
All water systems in flood-prone areas, whether public or private, shall be floodproofed to a point 1 1/2 feet above the established flood level or regulatory flood elevation, where available. If there is an existing centralized water supply system within or near the subdivision or land development, the Board of Supervisors shall require the developer to connect to this system, where practical, and shall prescribe the procedures to be followed by the developer in connecting to said system.
L. 
All other public or private utilities and facilities shall be elevated or floodproofed to a point 1 1/2 feet above the established flood level or regulatory flood elevation, where available.
M. 
The Board of Supervisors, in its consideration of any preliminary plan of subdivision and land development, shall condition its approval upon the execution of measures designed prevent accelerated soil erosion and resulting sedimentation, as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. All applicable regulations and permit requirements of said Department, as stipulated in its Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control Manual, shall be followed by all parties engaged in earthmoving activities.
N. 
All continuously flowing natural watercourses shall be maintained in their natural state, except that removal of debris and correction of severe erosion shall be required.
O. 
Intermittent watercourses often are significant elements at the headwaters of larger streams and are usually small in size. Therefore, developers should be encouraged to design and build around with respect for these drainageways, and the Board of Supervisors may allow rerouting of these drainageways only when serious considerations so warrant or when the site drainage will be improved by such proposed alignment changes.
P. 
Unless alignment is authorized in accordance with Subsection O above, intermittent watercourses shall be maintained essentially at their existing alignments and gradients, except that they may be improved by minor regrading and shall either be planted in grass or provided with erosion preventive improvements, such as riprap. Paving of such watercourses shall not be allowed nor shall piping, except under roads, driveways and walkways.
Q. 
Where a subdivision or land development lies partially or completely in a flood-prone area or where the subdivision or land development borders on a flood-prone area, the plan shall include detailed information identifying the following:
(1) 
The location and elevation of existing and proposed streets, water supply and sanitary facilities, building sites, structures, soil types and proposed floodproofing measures.
(2) 
The boundaries of the floodplain area and the base flood elevation as defined in the Floodplain Conservation District of the Lower Providence Township Zoning Ordinance.[4]
[4]
Editor's Note: A description of the Floodplain Conservation District is contained in the Zoning Ordinance. See Ch. 143, Zoning.
R. 
Requirements and calculations. All storm sewers and culverts in flood-prone areas shall be installed in conformance with the Township's Engineering Standards and in conformance with the Township Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance.[5]
[5]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter, and Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
S. 
Waivers. Guidelines for relaxation from the requirements set forth in this section are as follows:
(1) 
A waiver shall not be issued within any designated regulatory floodway if any increase in flood levels during the base flood discharge would result.
(2) 
A waiver shall only be issued if there is:
(a) 
A showing of good and sufficient cause.
(b) 
A determination that failure to relax the requirements would result in exceptional hardship to the applicant.
(c) 
A determination that the relaxing of a requirement will not result in increased flood heights, additional threats to public safety or extraordinary public expense; create nuisances; cause fraud on or victimization of the public; or conflict with existing local laws or ordinances.
(3) 
A waiver shall only be issued upon a determination that the waiver is the minimum necessary, considering the flood hazard, to afford relief.
(4) 
The Township shall maintain a record of all waivers, including justification for their issuance, and report such decisions issued in its annual report submitted to the Federal Insurance Administrator.
[1]
Editor's Note: See also Ch. 86, Floodplains.
A. 
Where any excavation or grading is proposed or where any existing trees, shrubs or other vegetative cover will be removed, the developer shall consult the Montgomery County Conservation District representative concerning plans for erosion and sediment control and the geologic conditions of the site in order to determine the type and magnitude of development that the site may safely accommodate. Before undertaking any excavation or grading, the developer shall conform to all pertinent laws, regulations and ordinances of the state and Lower Providence Township.
B. 
No subdivision or land development plan shall be approved unless:
(1) 
There has been a plan approved by the Board of Supervisors that provides for minimizing erosion and sedimentation consistent with this section and an improvement bond or other acceptable securities are deposited with the Township in the form of an escrow guaranty which will insure installation and completion of the required improvements; or
(2) 
There has been a determination by the Board of Supervisors that a plan for minimizing erosion and sedimentation is not necessary.
C. 
The Board of Supervisors, in its consideration of any preliminary plan of subdivision and land development, shall condition its approval upon the execution of measures designed prevent accelerated soil erosion and resulting sedimentation, as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. All applicable regulations and permit requirements of said Department, as stipulated in its Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control Manual, shall be followed by all parties engaged in earthmoving activities. The manual is available at the office of the Montgomery County Conservation District, Norristown, Pennsylvania. The Township Engineer shall assure compliance with the appropriate specifications and requirements.
D. 
Any measures proposed to minimize erosion and sedimentation shall be designed, constructed, installed and/or maintained in conformance with the requirements of the Township's Stormwater and Erosion Control Ordinance[2] and those of the Department of Environmental Protection, whichever are more stringent.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Part 3, Stormwater and Erosion Control, of this chapter.
Bridges, culverts, dams and/or other structures related to watercourses shall be designed, constructed, installed and/or maintained in conformance with the requirements of the Township's Engineering Standards,[1] Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Standards and/or the Department of Environmental Protection requirements.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
A. 
Sanitary sewers shall be installed and connected to the Township sanitary sewer system. Where the subdivision or land development necessitates a capital improvement of the Township sanitary sewer system, the applicant shall pay that portion of said capital expenditure as is necessitated by the subdivision or land development.
B. 
Where the subdivision or land development is inaccessible to sanitary sewers, the Board of Supervisors shall require the subdivider, developer or builder to obtain from the Department of Environmental Protection certificates of approval of the sewage disposal facilities to be provided by the subdivider, developer or builder, in accordance with current state regulations.
C. 
When private streets are utilized, the subdivider or the applicant shall execute a recordable covenant with the Township and/or Township Sewer Authority that, for the purposes of sewer connections, assessments and rentals, the rights and liabilities of himself and his grantees, heirs, successors and assigns shall be the same as if his property abutted a public street.
D. 
Requirements and calculations.
(1) 
All sanitary sewers and on-site disposal systems shall be designed, constructed, developed, installed and/or maintained in conformance with Township's Engineering Standards.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
(2) 
In order to facilitate the treatment of wastewater, sewage treatment facilities must be installed by the developer subject to the rules and regulations promulgated under the Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities Act, Act 537 of 1965,[2] as contained in the Department of Environmental Protection, Subpart C, Article 1, Chapters 71 and 73. Prior to final approval, the following should be certified:
(a) 
Assurance that the proposed sewerage facility is in compliance with the Township sewage facilities plan, as specified in Chapter 71, as referenced above.
(b) 
Permits granted by the certified local sewerage enforcement officer for the installation of an individual or group sewerage system, pursuant to Chapter 73 as referenced above.
(c) 
Assurance that other than required federal and state wastewater permits will be obtained in due course.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
[2]
Editor's Note: See 35 P.S. § 750.1 et seq.
A. 
The subdivider shall provide service to each lot in a proposed subdivision. Except where individual, private on-site wells are used, the applicant shall present evidence that water will be supplied to each lot in a proposed subdivision by a certified public utility or municipal corporation, authority or utility.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
B. 
The location of any existing or proposed well(s) shall be shown on the preliminary plan for each lot and adjoining lot, where applicable.
C. 
Fire hydrants.[1] Fire hydrants shall be provided by the subdivider or developer and shall be located at accessible points throughout the subdivision or development when central water supply is available. Hydrants shall be located to ensure adequate fire protection and are subject to the approval of the Township Engineer and Fire Marshal.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 83, Fire Prevention, § 83-4C.
D. 
All public water services, private wells and fire hydrants shall be designed, constructed, developed, installed and/or maintained in conformance with the Township's Engineering Standards.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
E. 
Where no centralized water supply is available to the subdivision or land development, the Board of Supervisors shall require the subdivider, developer or builder to obtain from the district sanitarian of the Department of Environmental Protection certificates of approval as to the quality and adequacy of the water supply proposed to be utilized by the subdivider, developer or builder. Approval of the type and construction methods to be employed in the installation of the individual water supply system shall be in accordance with the current state regulations and those of the Township. Consideration should be given to the probability of an eventual interconnection with a centralized water system in the future.
The widths and locations of easements and rights-of-way shall be determined by the Township Engineer for all utilities, including stormwater facilities, and shall be governed by the additional requirements of the Township's Engineering Standards,[1] and the following:
A. 
All underground facilities within street rights-of-way shall be installed prior to street paving at locations approved by the Township Engineer for the full width of the right-of-way.
B. 
The arrangement for all service connections or laterals shall be the responsibility of the subdivider, developer or builder and shall be installed at the expense of the applicant or subdivider.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
For development in all multifamily, commercial and industrial districts, the applicant shall, at a minimum, provide landscaping in accordance with the following two categories as required in §§ 143-28B and 143-66 of Chapter 143, Zoning.
A. 
Internal landscaping. Internal landscaping shall be required for buffering and/or screening purposes. Plants in this category shall include shade trees; shrubs; ground covers, including lawn areas, earthen mounding; and/or other features in compliance with the following:
(1) 
In all traffic-barrier islands and near driveway and road intersections, shade trees, ground cover plants and shrubs, to a height of three feet, shall be the only materials planted.
(2) 
In other areas, where visibility will not be impaired, planting should also include flowering and/or evergreen trees and shrubs.
(3) 
The minimum number of trees and shrubs required shall be as follows:
(a) 
One shade tree and one evergreen tree per 5,000 square feet of paved area used as parking, loading and driveways.
(b) 
One flowering or evergreen shrub per 1,500 square feet of paved area used as parking, loading and driveways.
(c) 
Ground cover plants, growing to less than one foot in height, shall not count toward the minimum required number of plants.
B. 
Perimeter landscaping. Each multifamily or nonresidential development shall be screened as a necessary safeguard to the character of an adjacent area. Such screening shall be permanently maintained to present an attractive appearance. Screen planting requirements shall be applicable along areas fronting on roads, areas adjacent to other properties, areas along parking lot facilities and areas along mobile home developments. Perimeter landscaping shall consist of the same types of plants and other landscape features as internal landscaping in compliance with the following:
(1) 
Along road rights-of-way, shade trees shall be planted a minimum distance of five feet beyond the ultimate right-of-way line inside the lot. Trees shall be so located so as not to interfere with the installation and maintenance of sidewalks and utilities. Trees shall be planted not less than 40 feet apart and no more than 50 feet apart.
(2) 
Along property lines abutting similar multifamily or nonresidential districts or developments, the minimum number of trees and shrubs shall be as follows:
(a) 
One shade tree per 100 feet of property line.
(b) 
One evergreen tree and one flowering tree or three flowering or evergreen shrubs per 150 feet of property line.
(3) 
Along property lines abutting all single-family residential or institutional districts or uses a screen buffer shall be provided as specified in Subsection C.
[Added 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
C. 
Screen buffer design.
(1) 
The primary component of a screening buffer shall be a double row of evergreen trees spaced 15 feet apart on center, with the trees in one row offset 7 1/2 feet from the trees in the other row, and the rows shall be at least five feet apart. These trees shall be not less than six feet in height at the time of planting and shall be of such species that the expected height at maturity shall be not less than 20 feet.
(2) 
The secondary component of a screening buffer shall be either earthen mounding or the use of additional plant materials to supplement the minimum required double row of evergreen trees.
(a) 
Variations in the sizes and shapes of earthen mounds, which resemble natural, rounded forms, are strongly encouraged. The unnaturally graded appearance of uniform, linear mounding shall be avoided. Slopes greater than three to one shall be avoided.
(b) 
If earthen mounds are not used, additional tree planting shall be required. The number of additional trees shall be equal to 50% of the number of evergreen trees required by Subsection C(1) above. These additional trees may be evergreen, flowering, shade or otherwise ornamental species and shall be planted in accordance with a planting plan designed to soften the linear appearance of the double row of evergreen trees. The minimum size of trees when planted shall be between five to eight feet in height, and one- to two-inch caliper for deciduous material and six feet in height for evergreens.
(c) 
As an alternative to planting only trees as required by Subsection C(2), large ornamental shrubs may be substituted for the additional trees in compliance with the following:
[1] 
A minimum of 50% of the trees required by Subsection C(2) shall be planted.
[2] 
Shrubs may be substituted for the remaining 50% of the trees required by Subsection C(2) at a ratio of two shrubs per tree.
(d) 
The types of buffer trees shall be such that, when grown to full maturity, the buffer trees shall not impede the utilization of solar energy by neighboring structures.
(3) 
As an alternative to the possible linear appearance of the minimum requirements for a buffer area, applicants are encouraged to provide innovative, free-form screening buffers which need not be located entirely within the minimum required width. The minimum number of required evergreen trees shall be equal to the number otherwise required, although they need not be placed in a linear fashion. The mounding requirements of Subsection C(2), however, shall be adhered to. Any alternative screening buffer shall be subject to approval by the Board of Supervisors, upon recommendations of the Township Planning Commission, either or both of whom may seek the advice of technical experts in the review of the alternate plans.
(4) 
Visually opaque, decorative fencing may be used to supplement the landscaping requirements above, provided that it does not exceed six feet in height, and its appearance shall be softened by groupings or ornamental plant materials, preferably located on both sides of the fence.
D. 
All plant material shall be guaranteed for 18 months from the date when planted. All plant material which dies within that time shall be replaced by the applicant at his cost.
E. 
Additional buffers. The Board of Supervisors may determine that buffer planting is necessary when any of the following conditions is likely to occur as a result of the proposed subdivision and land development:
(1) 
Substantial changes in air quality.
(2) 
Substantial changes in noise or vibration levels.
(3) 
Substantial changes in the site views from nearby premises or in the degradation of the privacy of nearby premises.
F. 
All buffers required under this section shall meet the requirements of Chapter 143, Zoning.
A. 
All subdivisions and land developments shall be designed to preserve and protect the natural features of the land. Natural features include existing grades and contours, bodies of water and watercourses, woodlands or large trees, street shade trees, scenic or historic points, pedestrian walks and bridle trails that have been in public use and other community assets.
B. 
In addition to the above, plans should be designed to minimize the disturbance of critical impact areas. Critical impact areas are environmentally sensitive features or conditions, including but not limited to stream corridors, streams, wetlands, estuaries, slopes greater than 15%, highly acidic or highly erodible soils, areas of high water table, mature stands of native vegetation and aquifer recharge and required discharge areas.
C. 
The required planting plan shall show all critical impact areas and shall include a statement of the impacts upon critical areas of the plan. Tree cutting shall not be started until the planting plan is approved by the Board of Supervisors.
D. 
The burden shall be on the developer to justify any material changes in the natural features of the land by satisfactory proofs that subdivision or land development would not be feasible without such changes and that there are no practical alternatives. The fact that subdivision or land development would involve greater expense or less density because of the maintenance of certain natural features will not in and of itself be considered a justification of changes in such features.
E. 
Limit of contract. Where the applicant is offering for dedication, or is required by ordinance to establish a reservation of open space or preserve an area of scenic or historic importance, a limit of contract, which will confine excavation, earthmoving procedures and other changes to the landscape, may be required to ensure preservation and prevent destruction of the character of the area in open space.
F. 
Preserved landscaping. Natural features proposed to be preserved may be used to satisfy landscaping and buffer requirements when the preserved plantings are comparable to the required improvements.
G. 
Topsoil preservation.
(1) 
Removal.
[Amended 12-20-1990 by Ord. No. 368]
(a) 
Residential development. The developer shall strip back from each residential lot and retain on each residential lot all topsoil from the lot. There shall be no release of excess topsoil permitted until each lot shall be graded with a minimum of eight inches of topsoil after examination by the Township Engineer.
(b) 
Commercial/industrial development. After final grading, there shall be a minimum of eight inches of topsoil on the entire site other than that portion of the site where there are buildings or other impervious surface coverage. There shall be no release of excess topsoil permitted from the site until examination by the Township Engineer.
(2) 
All areas of the site shall be stabilized by seeding or planting on slopes of 10% or more, and planted in ground cover on slopes of 20% or more, provided that rip-rap shall be utilized for banks exceeding 25%.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
H. 
Natural resources preservation. All applications for subdivision and land development must comply with the provisions of Part 9 of this chapter. Where the contents of this provision are in conflict with other chapters of the Township Code, the stricter requirements shall be used.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384; 3-19-2009 by Ord. No. 576[1]]
[1]
Editor's Note: This ordinance also repealed former Subsection I, Compensatory planting, which immediately followed this subsection. See now Art. XXIII, Natural Resources Protection.
[Amended 8-10-1992 by Ord. No. 384]
Shade trees shall be planted along both sides of all new or existing streets at intervals of no less than 40 feet and no more than 50 feet, except where tree masses have been preserved where shade trees would otherwise be located. Trees shall be placed back of the right-of-way line of street, so as not to interfere with the installation and maintenance of sidewalks, drainage facilities and/or utilities and shall be of two-inch caliper, balled and burlapped, and guaranteed for 18 months after planting. Species selection shall be at the discretion of the Board of Supervisors or as recommended by the Planning Commission. The types of shade trees shall be such that when grown to full maturity the trees shall not impede the utilization of solar energy by neighboring structures.
The use and development of any land structure within an historic district included in the National Register of Historic Places shall comply with the applicable federal regulations for the district, including the Secretary of the Interior's Rehabilitation Standards. Evansburg Historic District in Lower Providence is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Survey monuments are required for all lots in accordance with the Township's Engineering Standards.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Engineering Standards, included at the end of this chapter.
[Amended 4-7-2005 by Ord. No. 522]
The design for all outdoor lighting installations, including security lighting, shall be reviewed by the Township of Lower Providence, or its duly appointed representative, for conformance with Chapter 105 of the Code of the Township of Lower Providence Township. As determined by the Lower Providence Township Planning and/or Zoning Director, the required site plan design submittal items as required in § 105-18 for all outdoor lighting installations shall be included with every proposed preliminary or final land development or site plan submittal pursuant to the issuance of a building/zoning permit. In all cases, the Township of Lower Providence, or its duly appointed representative, prior to issuance of a building/zoning permit and prior to construction of the outdoor lighting installation, shall approve the outdoor lighting design. The lighting design information and luminaire information submitted for approval shall correlate with the actual lighting equipment installed in the field. Installation of lighting equipment in the field which is not the same as that approved in the design submittal, is prohibited. All commercial, industrial or institutional uses shall be lighted, and these lighting fixtures shall be decorative, aesthetically pleasing and incorporate a Village scheme unless the Board of Supervisors approves alternate types of fixtures upon a waiver request of the applicant.
A. 
Water originating from other than natural sources, such as swimming pools, air-conditioning units, sump pumps or other dry weather flow, wherever practical, shall be discharged into natural watercourses on the property or connected directly into the nearest storm drainage system. These facilities may not be used for polluted matter.
B. 
Within all subdivisions and land developments, structures which have basements shall be required to have sump pump pits installed by the developer, his agent, builder or builders. In addition thereto, the owner of any lot or group of lots erecting and constructing any structure which contains a basement shall be required to install a sump pump pit. Sump pumps and floating slabs shall be installed in all residential structures in accordance with standards specified by the Township Code Enforcement Officer.
C. 
Sump pump drainage or unnatural drainage identified above must be connected either to a natural watercourse or to an underground storm drainage system. The sump pump requirement may be waived by the Township Engineer or other designated official if deemed to be unnecessary.