City of Kalamazoo, MI
Kalamazoo County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
The following base zoning districts are established in this Ordinance:
Table 2.1-1 Established Base Zoning Districts
Residential (R) Districts
RS-4
Residential, Single-Dwelling
RS-5
Residential, Single-Dwelling
RS-7
Residential, Single-Dwelling
RD-8
Residential, Duplex
RD-19
Residential, Duplex
RM-15
Residential, Multi-Dwelling
RM-15C
Residential, Multi-Dwelling (Campus Area)
RM-24
Residential, Multi-Dwelling
RM-36
Residential, Multi-Dwelling
RMHP
Residential, Mobile Home Park
RMU
Residential, Mixed Use
Commercial (C) Districts
CMU
Commercial, Mixed Use
CNO
Commercial, Neighborhood Office
CN-1
Commercial, (Local) Neighborhood
CO
Commercial, Office
CN-2
Commercial, Neighborhood (Shopping Center)
CC
Commercial, Community
CCBD
Commercial Central Business
CBTR
Commercial, Business, Technology and Research
Manufacturing (M) Districts
M-1
Manufacturing, Limited
M-2
Manufacturing, General
Special Purpose Districts
P
Public
IC
Institutional Campus
All residential zoning district names begin with the letter “R,” which is a short-hand reference to “residential.” The second letter of all “R” district map symbols (other than the RMHP district) provides an indication of the primary characteristic of the district —”S” for single-dwelling, “D” for duplex, and “M” for multi-dwelling. Residential districts that end with a number provide a short-hand reference to the maximum density allowed in the district (expressed in terms of the number of dwelling units allowed per acre of land area). The RM-15 district, for example, is a residential zoning district that is primarily intended for multi-unit building types, with a maximum allowed density of 15 units per acre.
A. 
RS, Residential Single-Dwelling Districts.
1. 
Description and Purpose. The primary purpose of the RS districts is to accommodate the development of single dwelling units on individual lots. The districts are intended to create, maintain and promote primarily owner-occupied housing, although they do permit nonresidential uses that are compatible with residential neighborhoods.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table[1], for a list of uses allowed in all R districts.
[1]
Editor's Note: The Use Table is included as an attachment to this chapter.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.1: Residential District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in all R districts except the RMHP district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in all the R districts.
5. 
Occupancy Limits in RS Districts. An owner-occupied, one-family dwelling unit in any RS district may be occupied by a family or a maximum of three unrelated adults. [Note: three unrelated adults are allowed because a family may be defined as any two unrelated adults, and a family may have one roomer (2+1=3).] The keeping of one roomer in an owner-occupied, one-family dwelling unit that is occupied by a family is permitted. A non-owner-occupied, one-family dwelling unit may only be occupied by a family, or a maximum of two unrelated adults.
B. 
RD, Duplex Districts.
1. 
Description and Purpose. The primary purpose of the RD districts is to accommodate the development of two-family dwellings (duplexes or attached houses) and single dwelling units on individual lots.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in all R districts.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.1: Residential District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in all R districts except the RMHP district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in all the R districts.
5. 
Occupancy Limits in RD Districts. An owner-occupied dwelling unit in any RD district may be occupied by a family, or a maximum of four unrelated adults. The keeping of one roomer in an owner-occupied dwelling unit that is occupied by a family is permitted. A non-owner-occupied dwelling unit may only be occupied by a family or a maximum of four unrelated adults
C. 
RM, Multi-Dwelling Districts.
1. 
Description and Purpose.
a) 
General. The primary purpose of the RM districts is to accommodate the development of multi-unit housing (i.e., more than one dwelling unit per lot). The districts are intended to create, maintain and promote a mix of housing opportunities for City residents.
b) 
RM-15C. The RM-15C district is intended to protect and enhance those areas developed or likely to develop with medium-density, multiple-family dwellings close to institutions of higher education. The district regulations are designed to promote a suitable environment for a variety of residential types and provide regulations to address increased off-street parking needs, ensure building designs that are compatible with a campus community and prevent overcrowding. The RM-15C district has higher parking requirements for multifamily dwellings, to reflect the generally higher occupancy of such units near institutions of higher education.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in all R districts.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.1: Residential District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in all R districts except the RMHP district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in all the R districts.
5. 
Occupancy Limits in the RM-15C District. An owner-occupied dwelling unit in the RM-15C district may be occupied by a family or a maximum of six unrelated adults. The keeping of two roomers in an owner-occupied dwelling unit that is occupied by a family is permitted. A non-owner-occupied dwelling unit may only be occupied by a family or a maximum of six unrelated adults.
D. 
RMHP, Mobile Home Park District.
1. 
Description and Purpose. The RMHP, Mobile Home Park district is established for the purpose of providing a specific district for manufactured and mobile homes, manufactured (mobile) home parks and appropriate accessory and supporting uses. The district is intended to ensure and promote the health, safety, and welfare of residents by establishing minimum standards for the location, density, improvement, and design of mobile home parks and subdivisions.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in all R districts.
3. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in all the in RMHP district unless such standards are inconsistent with the standards in Subsection 4 below.
4. 
Mobile Home Park Development Standards. Mobile Home Park Development in the RMHP district is subject to the following standards, including all applicable requirements of the Mobile Home Commission Act, 1987 PA 96, MCLA § 125.2301; MSA 19.855(101), as amended, and the rules of the Michigan Mobile Home Commission set forth and provided under the Act, as amended, and the requirements of this section.
a) 
Minimum Site Area/District Size. Ten acres.
b) 
Minimum Lot (Mobile Home Space) Area. A mobile home park shall be developed with sites averaging 5,500 square feet per mobile home unit. This required site size standard may be reduced by 20%, provided that each individual mobile home site shall be at least 4,400 square feet in area. For each square foot of land gained through the reduction of a site below 5,500 square feet, at least an equal amount of land shall be provided as on-site open space. This open space shall be in addition to that required under R 125.1946, Rule 946 and R 125.1941 and R 125.1944, Rules 941 and 944 of the Michigan Administrative Code.
c) 
Required Separation Distances. The requirements of Rules 941 and 944 of the Michigan Mobile Home Commission Regulations, as amended must be met for all appropriate distance and setbacks.
d) 
Minimum Lot (Mobile Home Space) Width. Forty feet, measured at the minimum front setback.
e) 
Minimum Lot (Mobile Home Space) Depth. Eighty feet, measured at the midpoint of the lot's width.
f) 
Maximum Building Height. Thirty-five feet.
g) 
Parking. At least two off-street parking spaces shall be provided for each mobile home dwelling unit. Required parking spaces shall be located on or adjacent to each mobile home space. Also, visitor parking is required at one parking space per three home sites and shall be located within 500 feet of the home sites served.
h) 
Sidewalks. Concrete sidewalks shall be provided along at least one side of all streets within mobile home parks to accommodate pedestrians in a safe and convenient manner. Sidewalks shall have a minimum width of four feet.
i) 
Mobile Home Stands. Every mobile home space shall consist of a concrete pad with a minimum thickness of four inches and a minimum size that is at least as large as the mobile home that occupies the space.
j) 
Utilities. All mobile home parks shall provide for underground installation of utilities (including electricity and telephone) in both public ways and private extensions of public ways. All fuel oil tanks shall be located underground and sited in a uniform manner on each mobile home space. All utilities provided shall comply with the requirements of Rules 929 thru 940a of the Michigan Mobile Home Commission Regulations.
k) 
Screening. Mobile home parks shall be screened along all sides that are adjacent to streets and residential zoning districts by fences or walls. Mobile home park boundaries that are adjacent to streets must include fences or walls with trees and shrubs planted along the exterior of the fence or wall. Trees shall be spaced no more than 30 feet apart and shrubs shall be installed to ensure a solid hedge at least three feet in height within one year of planting.
l) 
Skirting. Mobile home dwelling units shall be skirted and skirting must be maintained so as not to provide a harborage for rodents or create a fire hazard. All requirements of Rule 604 of the Michigan Mobile Home Commission Requirements pertaining to skirting must also be met.
m) 
Storm Shelter. Mobile home parks shall have a shelter for the protection of persons within the park in case of storm or disaster. Such shelter shall be placed below grade level or within a structure that is able to withstand the effects of tornados and other storm elements. Storm shelters must be centrally located within the park and clearly identified as an emergency shelter for park residents. The shelter shall be engineered and architecturally designed in accordance with City of Kalamazoo Building Codes. The shelter shall contain a minimum area of at least five square feet per mobile home unit (to be computed based upon the maximum number of units planned for the park in its ultimate configuration) or two square feet per capita (a maximum number of persons per dwelling to equal 2.5 for the purposes of computation), whichever is greater.
n) 
Site Plan Review and Other Approvals.
1) 
Prior to development of mobile home parks, a Full site plan shall be approved pursuant to the procedures and standards of § 8.3H: Site Plan.
2) 
Prior to developing a mobile home park and commencing work thereon, all requirements of this Ordinance shall be met and a building permit shall be issued pursuant to the requirements of the City's Building Code. In addition, no physical improvements shall be made and no building or structure shall be erected, altered, repaired, or added to unless a written permit has been previously secured and the plans for that improvement have been reviewed and approved by the Planning Commission.
o) 
Mobile Home Subdivision Development Standards. If the area proposed for a mobile home park is determined to be a subdivision, the applicant shall comply with the procedural and substantive requirements of the City's Subdivision Ordinance.
p) 
Existing Mobile Home Parks and Subdivisions. Mobile home parks or subdivisions developed prior to January 5, 1970, shall not be governed by this Ordinance unless specifically stated in this Ordinance (a mobile home park or subdivision shall be considered to be developed prior to January 5, 1970 if it was approved by the State Health Commissioner prior to January 5, 1970); provided, however, that no existing mobile home park shall be permitted to expand or have placed a greater number of mobile homes within its existing boundaries unless these additional units conform to all of the standards and requirements of this Ordinance; and provided further that any existing mobile home park shall not be expanded beyond its present or existing developed boundaries unless the new area developed conforms to all the standards and requirements of this Ordinance.
E. 
RMU, Residential Mixed Use.
1. 
Description and Purpose. The RMU, Residential Mixed Use district is intended to accommodate a variety of styles and densities of single-family, duplex, and multifamily residential dwelling units, live-work units, public and civic uses, and neighborhood scale commercial uses. This district is intended to be used in areas where the predominant character of development is residential, but separation of residential and nonresidential uses is not necessary, and the intention is for a broader mix of residential and nonresidential uses in the future. The RMU district will generally be used in conjunction with an overlay district specifying in more detail the intended scale, density, and style of permitted development.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table[2], for a list of uses allowed in all R districts.
[2]
Editor's Note: The Use Table is included as an attachment to this chapter.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.1: Residential District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in all R districts except the RMHP district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in all the R districts.
5. 
Occupancy Limits in RMU Districts. An owner-occupied, one-family dwelling unit in any RMU district may be occupied by a family or a maximum of three unrelated adults. [Note: Three unrelated adults are allowed because a family may be defined as any two unrelated adults, and a family may have one roomer (2+1=3).] The keeping of one roomer in an owner-occupied, one-family dwelling unit that is occupied by a family is permitted. A non-owner-occupied, one-family dwelling unit may only be occupied by a family, or a maximum of two unrelated adults.
All commercial zoning district names begin with the letter "C," which is a short-hand reference to "commercial." Subsequent letters of the commercial district map symbols are abbreviations indicating the general character of the district or simply abbreviations of the full district name. Numbers, where used, are intended to identify the relative intensity of similar districts. Thus, the CN-1 district name is intended to denote a commercial zoning district, with a neighborhood-oriented or neighborhood-serving character that is less intensive than its CN-2 counterpart.
A. 
CMU, Commercial Mixed Use.
1. 
Description and Purpose. The CMU, Commercial Mixed Use district is intended to accommodate a variety of styles and densities of commercial land uses, as well as duplex and multifamily units and public and civic uses. This district is intended to be used in areas where the predominant character of development is nonresidential, but separation of residential and nonresidential uses is not necessary, and the intention is for a broader mix of residential and nonresidential uses in the future. The CMU district will generally be used in conjunction with an overlay district specifying in more detail the intended scale, density, and style of permitted development.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CMU district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the CMU district.
4. 
Development Standards. All development in the CNO district that includes neighborhood commercial uses shall comply with those design standards in § 6.5A: Neighborhood Commercial, and all development in the CNO district shall comply with all other applicable requirements of Chapter 6: Development Standards.
B. 
CNO, Commercial Neighborhood Office District.
1. 
Description and Purpose. The CNO, Commercial Neighborhood Office district is primarily intended to accommodate low-intensity administrative and professional offices that are compatible with the character of residential neighborhoods. The district is also intended to be used as a transition district between higher intensity commercial areas and residential neighborhoods. The district allows administrative and professional office uses in structures that formerly housed residential dwelling units. Residential uses are also allowed in the district when located in a mixed-use structure (one containing office and residential uses).
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CNO district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the CNO district.
4. 
Design and Development Standards. All development in the CNO district shall comply with those design standards in § 6.5A: Neighborhood Commercial, as well as with all other applicable requirements of Chapter 6: Development Standards.
C. 
CN-1, Local Neighborhood Commercial District.
1. 
Description. The CN-1, Local Neighborhood Commercial district is primarily intended to encourage the development of very small scale retail sales and personal service uses within or very near residential neighborhoods. The regulations and standards promote pedestrian-oriented development at an intensity level that is compatible with surrounding residential areas. Uses are restricted in size to promote a local orientation and to limit adverse impacts on nearby residential areas.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CN-1 district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in CN-1 districts.
4. 
Design and Development Standards. All development in the CN-1 district shall comply with those design standards in § 6.5A: Neighborhood Commercial, as well as with all other applicable requirements of Chapter 6: Development Standards.
D. 
CO, Commercial Office District.
1. 
Description. The CO, Commercial Office district is generally intended to function as a medium- to high-intensity office district primarily along arterial streets. The district is intended to prevent strip commercial development by allowing office uses but not other commercial uses and to serve as a land use buffer between major streets and residential neighborhoods. It may also be an appropriate land use buffer between higher intensity commercial areas and residential neighborhoods.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CO district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in CO districts.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the CO district.
E. 
CN-2, Neighborhood Shopping Center District.
1. 
Description. The CN-2, Neighborhood Shopping Center district is primarily intended to encourage the development of small-scale retail sales and personal service uses at convenient locations that primarily serve nearby residential neighborhoods. The standards for the CN-2 district promote pedestrian-oriented development at an intensity level that is compatible with surrounding residential areas. Uses are restricted in size to promote a local orientation and to limit adverse impacts on nearby residential areas.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table[1], for a list of uses allowed in the CN-2 district.
[1]
Editor's Note: The Use Table is included as an attachment to this chapter.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in CN-2 district.
4. 
Design and Development Standards. All development in the CN-2 district shall comply with those design standards in § 6.5A: Neighborhood Commercial, as well as with all other applicable standards of Chapter 6: Development Standards.
F. 
CC, Community Commercial District.
1. 
Description. The CC, Community Commercial district is intended to accommodate larger community and regional shopping centers that serve a community-wide market area.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CC district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the CC district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the CC district.
G. 
CCBD, Central Business District.
1. 
Description. The CCBD, Commercial Central Business District is designed to accommodate those retail, service and office uses which are characteristic of the "downtown" area of the City. The district regulations are designed to establish and preserve the central business district as the principal office and retail center of the City.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CCBD district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the CCBD district.
4. 
Height. Maximum building heights in the CCBD district shall be as shown in the Exhibit on the following page, which allows for taller buildings near the historic core of the City and restricts heights to lower levels at the edges of the district near surrounding zone districts.
a) 
Area A. Area A is the darker shaded central core area. Primary structures in Area A shall be a minimum of two stories in height, and shall not be subject to a maximum height limit.
b) 
Area B. Area B is the lighter grey shaded area outside the central core area bounded by a solid line (but not including any areas included in Area A). Primary structures in Area B shall be a minimum of two stories in height, and may not be more than two stories taller than the tallest primary structure on any lot located within 200 feet of any property boundary of the subject lot.
Maximum Building Height
A Maximum Building Height.tif
5. 
Design and Development Standards. All development in the CCBD district shall comply with those design standards in § 6.5C: CCBD Kalamazoo Downtown Design Guidelines, as well as with all other applicable provisions of Chapter 6: Development Standards.
H. 
CBTR, Business, Technology and Research District.
1. 
Description.
a) 
The CBTR, Business, Technology and Research district is established for the purpose of:
1) 
Supporting economic development that is an asset to the community, neighbors and owners;
2) 
Promoting and maintaining desirable development activities in a setting that is in harmony with the surrounding area;
3) 
Preserving natural features and historic resources;
4) 
Maintaining and enhancing surface and ground water quality, and
5) 
Promoting architecturally attractive buildings and structures.
b) 
The CBTR district is established to provide a high-quality working environment for research and development institutions, offices, and certain specialized production and assembly establishments along with other special uses, all of a nonnuisance type. The nature, scale, and function of such uses will be limited and regulated to ensure that they pose no significant or unusual risk to the public health, safety, and welfare; generate a minimum of noise, heat, glare, odor, dust, vibration, or other nuisances; do not emit harmful radiation or pollution to the air, water, or ground; and create a minimum of traffic congestion, or any other safety hazards.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the CBTR district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the CBTR district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the CBTR district unless such standards are inconsistent with the standards in Subsection 5 below.
5. 
Additional Standards.
a) 
Outdoor Activities. All business, servicing, or processing must be conducted within completely enclosed buildings, except for the following:
1) 
Off-street parking and off-street loading; and
2) 
Drive-up service windows for banks and financial institutions.
b) 
Overall Development Plan. Where two or more development sites are to be developed together in accordance with an overall plan, or where one development site is to be subdivided into individual lots, evidence must be submitted, signed by the owners of all property involved or their legal representatives, showing that the remaining portions of the property will be developed in accordance with the intent and specific provisions of this district. This evidence must be submitted prior to site plan approval. Such evidence must include, at a minimum, the following information:
1) 
An overall development plan showing the size and layout of proposed individual development sites and subdivided lots; existing and proposed public streets and private roadways; existing and proposed utility systems; historic resources to be preserved; wetlands to be preserved; proposed stormwater management plans for the development; and other proposed site features such as landscape buffers.
2) 
Covenants, deed restrictions, or other legally binding agreements showing that individual development sites and subdivided lots will be improved and developed in accordance with the building and site improvement requirements of this district.
3) 
An anticipated schedule for the development of the development site and the construction of required improvements.
c) 
Building and Sign Design. The developer must create architectural and design standards for buildings and signs prior to the division of land or the creation of a condominium association within the CBTR district. The developer must also establish review procedures and the categories of membership for an architectural review committee. Prior to the division of land or the creation of a condominium association within this district, the architectural and design standards, review procedures and the categories of membership of the architectural review committee must be submitted to the Planning Commission for review and approval. All buildings and signs within the development must be reviewed and approved by the architectural review committee prior to the issuance of building permits. In the alternative, the developer may regulate building and sign design by deed or plat restrictions, the text of which must be approved by the Planning Commission. In cases where no architectural review committee procedure has been approved or deed or plat restrictions text has been approved, all building and sign designs must be reviewed and approved by the Planning Commission.
d) 
Site Plan Review Required. Development within the CBTR district is subject to the procedures and standards of § 8.3H, Site Plan, and § 6.2, Landscaping.
e) 
Signs. Signs must comply with the standards of Chapter 7: Signs.
[Amended 3-19-2007 by Ord. No. 1822]
f) 
Parking Lots and Loading Areas. Off-street parking lots and loading areas shall not be located in required front yard setbacks, but may be located in required side and rear yard setbacks no closer than 10 feet to the property line.
[Added 3-19-2007 by Ord. No. 1822]
All manufacturing zoning district names begin with the letter "M," which is a short-hand reference to "manufacturing." Numbers that follow the letter "M" indicate the relative intensity of uses and/or development allowed within the districts, with "M-1" indicating a manufacturing district that is less intensive than the M-2 district.
A. 
M-1, Limited Manufacturing District.
1. 
Description. The M-1, Limited Manufacturing district is primarily intended to accommodate low-impact manufacturing uses and activities that are not significantly objectionable to surrounding properties, in terms of traffic, noise, odor, smoke and other potential nuisance factors.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the M-1 district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the M-1 district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the M-1 district.
B. 
M-2, General Manufacturing District.
1. 
Description. The M-2, General Manufacturing district is primarily intended to accommodate low-, moderate- and high-impact industrial uses and activities and to prevent encroachment by residential and other uses that would eventually lead to land use conflicts.
2. 
Allowed Uses. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the M-2 district.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. See § 5.2: Commercial and Manufacturing District Standards, for the Density, Intensity and Dimensional standards that apply in the M-2 district.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the M-2 district.
A. 
P, Public District.
1. 
Description. The P, Public district is intended to accommodate uses of a governmental or public service nature, including major public facilities and parks. It offers an alternative district classification for such uses, thereby increasing development predictability throughout the City, especially within residential neighborhoods. The district is generally intended to be applied to land owned or otherwise controlled by the federal government, the state, the county, the City and school districts. This designation serves a notice function to those owning or buying land in proximity to publicly owned land.
2. 
Use Regulations. See § 4.1: Use Table[1], for a list of uses allowed in the P district.
[1]
Editor's Note: The Use Table is included as an attachment to this chapter.
3. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards.
a) 
The density, intensity and dimensional standards of the most restrictive abutting district apply to all areas of the P district site located within 150 feet of the abutting district. Stricter standards may be established at the time of site plan or special use approval.
b) 
For areas of the P district site located more than 150 feet from abutting districts, density, intensity and dimensional standards must be established as part of the site plan or special use approval process.
c) 
If no site plan or special use approval is required, no density or dimensional standards apply to that portion of a P district site located more than 150 feet from abutting districts.
4. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the P district.
B. 
IC, Institutional Campus District.
1. 
Purpose. The purpose of the IC, Institutional Campus district, is to accommodate large institutional uses in campus-like settings, such as colleges, schools, hospitals and large religious assemblies. The IC district is intended to promote and enhance the development and expansion of educational, medical and other large institutional uses, while minimizing the adverse impacts that can result when such uses are located near residential neighborhoods.
2. 
Development Review. All development within the IC district is subject to the review and approval procedures of § 8.3C: Planned Unit Development Overlay (PUD-O) District, even though an IC district rezoning is not a Planned Unit Development.
3. 
Use Regulations. See § 4.1: Use Table, for a list of uses allowed in the IC district.
4. 
Density/Intensity/Dimensional Standards. Density/intensity and dimensional standards must be established at the time of approval of an Institutional Master Plan.
5. 
Development Standards. See Chapter 6: Development Standards, for Development Standards that apply in the IC district.
6. 
Institutional Master Plans.
a) 
Purpose. Institutional Master Plan requirements are intended to provide a framework for development of large institutional uses in campus-like settings. Approval of an Institutional Master Plan is intended to permit flexibility in site development and in the design and arrangement of buildings that is not possible when development occurs on a lot-by-lot or building-by-building basis. In addition, it is intended that the master planning process and resulting master plan document protect the integrity of adjacent neighborhoods. The provisions for an institutional master plan are intended to create efficient, functional, and attractive areas that incorporate a high level of amenities and meet public objectives for protection and preservation of the natural and built environment. The provisions are intended to ensure compatible uses and structures within institutional master planned areas and between institutional areas and areas adjacent to them. The provisions are intended to prevent adverse impacts associated with the unplanned growth of large institutions; to ensure adequate provision for pedestrian and vehicular movement; to provide open spaces for light, air and recreation; and to provide for the efficient provision of utilities, services and facilities.
b) 
Master Planning Area. An Institutional Master Plan must be prepared and submitted by the institution and include all area within the IC district and an area extending out at least 300 feet from the boundary of the IC district, unless the City Planner establishes a different area requirement based on a review of the following:
1) 
Physical area occupied or controlled by the existing institution;
2) 
Trends in property values;
3) 
Redevelopment potential of surrounding areas;
4) 
Proximity of other institutional uses;
5) 
Condition of structures; and
6) 
Level of area vacancy.
c) 
Planning Requirements. An institutional master plan must, at a minimum, include the following information unless the City Planner determines that such information is not necessary to evaluate the proposed master plan and the institution's future impacts on surrounding neighborhoods.
1) 
The Institutional Master Plan must cover a ten-year period unless the City Commission approves a different time period at the time the Institutional Master Plan approval. An Institutional Master Plan will lapse and be of no further effect 10 years after the date of its approval by the City Commission unless the City Commission expressly establishes a different time period for expiration at the time of approval.
2) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include a statement that defines the organizational mission and objectives of the institution and description of how all development contemplated or defined by the institutional master plan advances the goals and objectives of the institution. The statement should describe the population to be served by the institution, and any projected changes in the size or composition of that population. It should also specify any services to be provided to residents in adjacent neighborhoods and in other areas of the Kalamazoo region.
3) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include a description of land, buildings, and other structures occupied by the institution as of the date of submission of the Institutional Master Plan.. At a minimum, the following information is required:
(a) 
Illustrative site plans showing the footprints of each building and structure, together with roads, sidewalks, parking, landscape features and other significant site improvements;
(b) 
Land and building uses;
(c) 
Gross floor area in square feet;
(d) 
Building height in stories and feet;
(e) 
Landscaping, signage and lighting plans; and
(f) 
A description of off-street parking and loading areas and facilities, including a statement of the approximate number of parking spaces in each area or facility.
4) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include a summary and projection of the institution's current and future needs for the following facilities:
(a) 
Academic;
(b) 
Service;
(c) 
Research;
(d) 
Office;
(e) 
Housing;
(f) 
Patient care;
(g) 
Public assembly;
(h) 
Parking; and
(i) 
Other facilities related to the institutional use.
5) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include a description of the land area and "development envelope" within which future development will occur. The development envelope must be described in narrative and through the use of drawings or models. The intent of this provision is to provide the institution with certainty regarding the future development potential of the site subject to the Institutional Master Plan while protecting the integrity of adjacent neighborhoods. The Institutional Master Plan must include the following estimates in describing the development envelope:
(a) 
Floor area ratio;
(b) 
Average daily and peak-hour traffic;
(c) 
Height;
(d) 
Setbacks;
(e) 
Total site area of open space; and
(f) 
Total number of parking spaces to be provided.
6) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include transportation and parking management plans that identify any traffic mitigation measures to be employed.
7) 
Institutional Master Plan must include pedestrian circulation guidelines and objectives, including a description of the circulation system to be provided through the campus and plans for ensuring the accessibility of pedestrian areas and open spaces.
8) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include design guidelines and objectives for new and renovated buildings and structures to assure their compatibility with supporting neighborhoods and districts and to minimize potential adverse impacts on such neighborhoods. Urban design guidelines must include listings of appropriate materials, height, bulk, massing and colors that will be used to guide the course of proposed and future development.
9) 
The Institutional Master Plan must identify standards and programs that will be put in place to ensure that the quality of the surrounding neighborhoods is maintained or enhanced. The Institutional Master Plan must report on the results of the institution's citizen participation effort in preparing the Institutional Master Plan. At a minimum, the citizen participation report must include the following information:
(a) 
Details of techniques the applicant used to involve the public.
(b) 
Dates, locations and attendance of all meetings where citizens were invited to discuss the applicant's proposal.
(c) 
A summary of concerns, issues and problems expressed during the process.
(d) 
Concerns, issues and problems the applicant is unwilling or unable to address and why.
10) 
The Institutional Master Plan must include a description of other nearby institutions and report on efforts to coordinate planning with those other institutions.