Township of Stafford, NJ
Ocean County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents

§ 130-65 Specific design standards and construction details.

A. 
General. The purpose of this section is to establish a uniform set of specific design standards and construction details. The standards shall be applicable to all site plans, subdivisions and other development applications and shall be used in conjunction with the general design and performance standards outlined elsewhere in this chapter. All improvements shall be installed in complete accordance with the standards of this chapter as specified in this section and as set forth in Chapter 211, Zoning, with other particular specifications approved by the Board and Township Engineer and with all other applicable municipal, county and state regulations. Where both residential and commercial development are planned in a mixed-use development, these standards shall apply to the residential part or parts of such development where such residential part or parts are discrete and separate from planned commercial parts as evidenced by, for example, separate building(s), separate parking and separate access features.
[Amended 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
B. 
Standard specifications and construction details. The Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction of the New Jersey Department of Transportation, latest edition, including all addenda, and the Standard Construction Details of the New Jersey Department of Transportation, latest revision, as modified, supplemented, amended or superseded by the requirements of this chapter, by the approval of a final plat, by particular agreement among the Board, Township Council and subdivider or by other applicable municipal, county or state regulations shall govern the completion of the required improvements. Such standard specifications and standard construction details are made a part of this chapter by this reference and will not be repeated herein. It is the responsibility of all the subdividers to familiarize themselves with these standards, copies of which may be examined at the office of the Township Engineer and may be obtained, upon payment of the cost thereof, from the New Jersey Department of Transportation. The requirement of this chapter of an approved final plat or of particular agreements and conditions of approval and of applicable municipal, county or state regulations shall govern and prevail in the case of conflict between them and the standard specifications or standard construction details. Should the Township adopt, subsequent to the effective date of this chapter, particular and specific standard construction details for Stafford Township, they shall govern and prevail over the Standard Construction Details of the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

§ 130-66 Streets and streetlighting, nonresidential development.

[Amended 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-83; 12-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-95; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 3-7-1989 by Ord. No. 89-25; 8-1-1989 by Ord. No. 89-83; 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
A. 
The arrangement of streets shall provide for the extension and realignment, as appropriate, of existing collector and primary streets. The arrangement of streets now shown on the Master Plan or an Official Map shall be such as to provide for and encourage the appropriate extension of existing streets, shall conform to the topography as far as practicable and shall allow for continued logical extension into adjoining undeveloped tracts. Streets shall be designed to promote safety and shall conform to the current requirements and policies of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), except as stated in the minor street design standards.
(1) 
Design of minor streets. Minor streets in residential subdivisions shall be laid out so that there is no possibility of their use by traffic having neither origin nor destination at the lots to which they provide access and shall conform to the standards of this chapter. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1.[1])
(a) 
Culs-de-sac (dead-end streets) may be used where necessary but should not have a center-line length, from the intersecting street center line to the center point of the cul-de-sac, less than 100 feet nor longer than 1,200 feet and should not provide access to more than 25 lots.
(b) 
When their use is possible, short loop streets are preferred to culs-de-sac. Short loop streets should provide access to no more than 45 lots, except that where access is provided by a combination of a short loop street and culs-de-sac, the maximum shall be 60 lots, provided that the length of the loop street alone will not exceed 3,000 feet. Loop streets shall have both of their termini located on the same major street to be so classified.
(c) 
In all residential zones, development bounded by any arterial or collector streets shall control access to the streets by having all driveways intersect minor streets. Where the size, shape, location or some other unique circumstance may dictate no other alternative than to have a driveway enter an arterial or collector street, the lot shall provide on-site turnaround facilities so that it is not necessary to back any vehicle onto an arterial or collector street, and abutting lots shall share a common access drive.
[1]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(2) 
Classification of streets. In any major subdivision, it shall be the duty of the Board to classify proposed streets according to their types. The Board, in making its decisions, shall refer to the Master Plan and shall consider conditions within the subdivision and surrounding area. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1.[2])
[2]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(3) 
Right-of-way and paving widths and street detail. Right-of-way widths, measured from lot line to lot line, graded widths and paving widths and other items shall be not less than the requirements set forth in the following Subsection A(4) unless otherwise indicated on the Master Plan or the Official Map. Where a proposed development will result in the extension of an existing street, the paved width of the extension shall be as set forth in Subsection A(4) hereafter or the paved width of the existing street, whichever is greater.
(4) 
Requirements for street classifications. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 1 and 2.[3])
Type
Minor
Residential
Residential
Subcollector
Primary
Collector
(County
Roads)
Right-of-way (row) width (feet)
60
70
80*
Paving widths, 2-way (feet)
28
36
40*
Curb radii at intersection (feet)
25
30
35
Tangents between reverse curves (minimum) (feet)
100
200
300
Horizontal center-line radius (feet)1
150
500
1,000
Maximum center-line grades
12%
10%
8%
Minimum center-line grades
1/2%
1/2%
1/2%
Maximum grades at intersection, 5% for distance from center-line intersection (feet)
100
150
300
Turnaround at end of cul-de-sac without center island
Radius of right-of-way (feet)
55 to 65
   Radius of pavement (feet)
40 to 50
Turnaround at end of cul-de-sac with center island
Radius of right-of-way (feet)
70
   Radius of pavement (feet)
55
   Maximum radius of center island (feet)
27
Curb face required (inches)
6
6
8
Pavement crown (inches)
6
8
8
Sidewalks
   Width (feet)
4
4
4
   Setback (from front curb face) (feet)
6 1/2
6 1/2
6 1/2
NOTES:
* As designed or indicated on the Master Plan or mandated by the Ocean County Engineer, Township Planning Board or Board Engineer.
[3]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 1 and 2, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(5) 
Vertical geometric requirements.
(a) 
At all points of grade changes, where the algebraic difference in intersecting grades equals one or greater, a vertical parabolic curve shall connect the intersecting grade lines. The vertical curve shall be of a length required to provide a smooth transition avoiding sharp crests or sags, provide proper drainage flow and provide the required horizontal and vertical sight and stopping distances set forth in the current requirements and policies of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). The vertical curve length shall be in accordance with AASHTO criteria for the design speed of the roadway, prevailing topographic conditions and existing horizontal and vertical sight obstructions. In no case shall the vertical curve lengths be less than the following minimums specified as follows:
[1] 
One hundred feet for algebraic differences in intersection grades of one or greater and less than two.
[2] 
Two hundred feet for algebraic differences in intersecting grades of two or greater and less than 10.
(b) 
Vertical sight distances. Vertical curves shall be a sufficient length to provide the minimum sight distances as required by current AASHTO requirements and in no case shall be less than the following:
[1] 
Minor streets: 200 feet.
[2] 
Collector streets: 300 feet.
(c) 
The location, by station, middle ordinate or K, length and point of vertical intersection (PVI) station must be indicated on the profiles.
(6) 
Where dead-end streets (culs-de-sac) are utilized, they shall conform to the following standards:
(a) 
Dead-end streets of a permanent nature (where provision for the future extension of the street in the boundary of the adjoining property is impractical or impossible) or of a temporary nature (where provision is made for the future extension of the street to the boundary line of adjoining property) shall provide a turnaround at the end with a right-of-way radius of not less than 60 feet and a cartway radius of not less than 50 feet. The center point for the radius shall be on the center line of the associated street or, if offset, to a point where the cartway radius also becomes a tangent to one of the curblines of the associated street. If the cul-de-sac is offset, the tangent shall be on the right side of the street, wherever possible, for approaching vehicles. In the center of the turnaround, a planting island equal in dimension to the cartway radius minus the cartway width of the roadway shall be provided in lieu of excessive pavement. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1.[4])
[4]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(b) 
If a dead-end street is of a temporary nature, provisions shall be made for removal of a turnaround and reversion of the excess right-of-way to the adjoining properties as an off-tract responsibility to the developer creating the street extension when the street is extended. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1.[5])
[5]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 1, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(7) 
No street shall have a name which will duplicate or so nearly duplicate in spelling or phonetic sound the names of existing streets so as to be confusing therewith. The continuation of an existing street shall have the same name. The names of new streets must be approved by the approving authority.
(8) 
All streets shall be curvilinear in horizontal alignment wherever deemed practical and feasible by either the Planning Board or the Planning Board Engineer and shall be designed to discourage speed and monotony. The maximum straight line distance shall not exceed 1,000 feet.
(9) 
Nonresidential streets. The widths of internal streets in business or industrial developments designed as a whole in accordance with a comprehensive site plan shall be determined by the Board in each case in the light of the circumstances of the particular situation and with a view to assuring the maximum safety and convenience of access for traffic and fire-fighting equipment, circulation and parking, including provisions for the loading and unloading of goods, and, in general, shall conform to collector street design standards.
(10) 
Subdivisions on existing streets. Subdivisions that adjoin or include existing streets which do not conform to the widths as shown on the Master Plan, the Official Map or the street width requirements of this chapter shall dedicate the required additional width along either one or both sides of the street as the Board may deem necessary.
(11) 
Street intersections. Street intersections shall be designed according to the following standards:
(a) 
No more than two streets shall cross the same point.
(b) 
Street intersections shall be at right angles wherever possible, and intersections of less than 70º, measured at the center line of streets, shall not be permitted.
(c) 
All intersections of less than 90º shall be discouraged.
(12) 
Approaches to all intersections shall follow a straight line for at least 100 feet, measured from the intersecting street corner line to the beginning of the curve. Streets intersecting another street from opposite sides shall have at least 200 feet between the two street center lines. Any development abutting an existing street which is classified as a collector street shall be permitted not more than one new street every 800 feet on the same side of the street within the boundaries of the tract being subdivided. In the spacing of streets, consideration will be given to the location of existing intersections on both sides of the development.
(13) 
Sight triangles shall be provided as required in this chapter.
(14) 
No development showing reserve strips controlling access to streets or another area, either developed or undeveloped, shall be approved, except where the control and disposal of land comprising such strips has been given to the governing body.
(15) 
Streets shall be constructed in accordance with the following standards (see Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 3[6]) and in accordance with the Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction of the New Jersey Department of Transportation as herein defined.
(a) 
Local and minor streets:
[1] 
Six inches of Class A or B road gravel or an approved equal.
[2] 
Two inches of bituminous stabilized base course.
[3] 
One and one-half inches of FABC-1 surface course or an approved equal.
(b) 
Collector streets:
[1] 
Six inches of Type 2, Class B, road gravel or an approved equal.
[2] 
Four inches of bituminous stabilized base course.
[3] 
Two inches of FABC-1 surface course or an approved equal.
[6]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 3, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(16) 
Street signs shall be enameled metal of the size and color equal and similar to the type now in use by Stafford Township. They shall be erected on galvanized steel posts in a workmanlike manner. At street intersections, one post shall carry two signs at right angles to denote the name of each street. Posts shall be 10 feet overall, with three feet in the ground surrounded with concrete.
(17) 
Street and road excavations shall include the work of clearing and grubbing within the limits of the right-of-way and outside thereof, within slope areas to be graded or as otherwise prescribed. The ground surface shall be cleared of trees, brush, weeds, roots, matted leaves, debris and other unsuitable matter before street and roadway subgrade operations are commenced. Trees which do not interfere with the operations shall not be removed but shall be protected during the progress of the work. Branches of trees overhanging the traveled way shall be cut off to a height of 14 feet above it, and cuts made more than one inch in diameter shall be painted. Tree stumps shall be grubbed out within the areas to be graded where the subgrade will be less than 3 1/2 feet above the ground surface.
B. 
Streetlights.
(1) 
Miscellaneous provisions.
(a) 
When required by the provisions of this chapter or by the approving authority, streetlights shall be installed in accordance with the recommended practice of street and highway lighting of the Illuminating Engineering Society along all streets within and abutting any development.
(b) 
Said streetlights shall be high-pressure sodium and shall meet the standards of Atlantic Electric, which presently are as follows:
Watts
Lumens
50
3,600
70
5,500
100
8,550
150
14,400
250
24,750
400
45,000
(c) 
All streetlighting standards, fixtures or luminaries which may be required shall be installed at the same time in a single process of installation. All wires and other equipment necessary to serve the streetlighting system shall be placed underground, the cost to be paid by the developer, and arrangements shall be made with the appropriate utility for carrying out this provision.
(2) 
In any development consisting of four or more residential units or any other type of nonresidential development, the developer shall be responsible for providing streetlighting so as to provide a minimum lighting level of five-tenths (0.5) horizontal footcandle on all local, local collector, minor arterial and principal arterial streets. The developer shall pay the full cost for the installation of any streetlights. Streetlights shall be of a type approved by the Council and by the electric utility company serving the proposed development. Upon notice from the Township, the developer shall deposit with the Township cash or an equivalent in the amount determined by the electric utility to be the cost of the initial installation of the streetlights. The Township shall utilize said cash deposit to pay for the cost of the initial installation of said streetlights.
(3) 
Streetlighting shall be provided by the developer in any development which has been approved by the Planning Board, Board of Adjustment or the Council. The Planning Board, Board of Adjustment or the Council, in case of appeal, in approving any development shall require the developer to install streetlighting as a condition of its approval of the development. The developer shall submit a plan for the installation of streetlights to the Board Engineer for approval.

§ 130-66.1 Streets and streetlighting, residential development.

[Added 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
Streets in all residential developments shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Subchapter 4 (Streets and Parking) of N.J.S.A. 5:21 (Residential Site Improvement Standards), as amended.

§ 130-67 Curbs, nonresidential development.

[Amended 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-83; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 3-7-1989 by Ord. No. 89-25; 9-21-1993 by Ord. No. 93-60; 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
A. 
Concrete curb shall be installed along every street within the development and at intersections with local roads, county roads and state highways, except in the PA, PV and FA Zones, where secondary local streets serving primarily a residential land access function shall be exempt from the curb installation requirement. The standard curb section to be used shall be not more than 10 feet in length and shall be set in accordance with approved lines and grades, and radial curbs shall be formed in an arc segment in a smooth curve. Chord segments are prohibited. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4.[1])
[1]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
B. 
Concrete curbs shall be eight inches by six inches by 18 inches (six inches' exposed face), using Class B concrete having a twenty-eight-day compressive strength of 4,500 pounds per square inch. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4.[2])
[2]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
C. 
Expansion joints conforming to the requirements of the New Jersey Department of Transportation shall be provided at twenty-foot intervals in all curbing, with construction joints being provided at ten-foot intervals. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4.[3])
[3]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
D. 
At locations specified by the approving authority and at all intersections, the curbing shall have a barrier-free design to provide a ramp for bicycles and/or wheelchairs, details for which may be obtained from the Engineer. In certain instances it may be necessary or desirable to construct alternate curb types. For example, these may be required by the Planning Board on the perimeter of channelizing islands or in areas of unusually heavy gutter drainage flow or may be desired by the subdivider for decorative purposes or to preserve vegetation (e.g., granite block curb, rolled concrete curb, etc.). If alternate curb types are to be permitted, an appropriate construction detail shall be submitted for approval with the preliminary and final plat. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4.[4])
[4]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 4, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
E. 
All curbs and driveway aprons shall be constructed in accordance with the specifications of the Code of the Township of Stafford as contained herein and § 187-13. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 4, 14 and 15).
[Amended 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101]

§ 130-67.1 Curbs, curbs and gutters, shoulders; residential development.

[Added 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
Curbs, curbs and gutters and shoulders in all residential developments shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Subchapter 4 (Streets and Parking) of N.J.A.C 5:21 (Residential Site Improvement Standards), as amended.

§ 130-68 Monuments.

[Amended 12-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-95]
Monuments shall be the size and shape required by N.J.S.A. 46:23-9.11 of the Map Filing Law, as amended, and shall be placed in accordance with the statute and indicated on the final map.

§ 130-69 Planting details and tree varieties.

[Amended 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-76; 12-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-95; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10]
The following shade trees or trees of equal or better quality and suitability shall be planted in the following locations. (Only nursery grown, healthy, cultivated varieties of the following species shall be utilized. All plantings must be approved by the board of jurisdiction or the Township Landscape Architect):
A. 
Plantings along streets or areas to be dedicated to Stafford Township adjacent to brackish waters, rivers, bay or lagoons:
(1) 
Platanus acerfolia, London plane-tree.
(2) 
Pyrus calleryana, callery pear.
(3) 
Sophora japonica, scholartree.
B. 
Plantings along streets or areas to be dedicated to Stafford Township (uplands):
(1) 
Acer saccharum, sugar maple.
(2) 
Acer platanoides, Norway maple.
(3) 
Fraxinus americana, white ash.
(4) 
Pyrus calleryana, callery pear.
(5) 
Quercus borealis, red oak.
(6) 
Quercus phellos, willow oak.
(7) 
Sophora japonica, scholartree.
(8) 
Tilia cordata, littleleaf linden.
(9) 
Zelkova serrata, Zelkova.
C. 
Plantings along streets or areas to be dedicated to Stafford Township (adjacent to fresh water):
(1) 
Acer rubrum, red maple.
(2) 
Fraxinus lanceolata, green ash.
(3) 
Gleditsia triancanthos, honeylocust.
(4) 
Liquidambar styraciflua, sweetgum.
(5) 
Platanus acerfolia, London plane-tree.
(6) 
Quercus phellos, willow oak.
D. 
Site plantings (adjacent to fresh or brackish waters) other than areas to be dedicated to Stafford Township:
(1) 
Any tree permitted under Subsection A or D of this section.
(2) 
Betula populifolia, birch.
(3) 
Prunus serrulata, Japanese cherry.
(4) 
Crategus oxycantha, hawthorn.
(5) 
Quercus palustris, pin oak.
(6) 
Salix babylonica, willow.
E. 
Site plantings on uplands other than areas to be dedicated to Stafford Township:
(1) 
Any tree permitted under Subsection B of this section.
(2) 
Cornus florida, dogwood.
(3) 
Malus species, crab apple.
(4) 
Quercus alba, white oak.
(5) 
Pinus strobus, white pine.
(6) 
Pinus thunbergi, black pine.
(7) 
Ilex americana, holly.
F. 
All plantings shall be planted in accordance with the details provided herewith, and all landscape plans shall include planting details which conform to the details provided herewith and additional requirements as appropriate to assure the proper installation, survival and growth of all plantings. (See Detail Nos. 1 through 4.[1])
[Amended 2-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-15]
[1]
Editor's Note: Details Nos. 1 through 4 are included as attachments to this chapter.
G. 
All plantings shall conform to the standards of the American Association of Nurserymen, Inc., as set in the most recent addition of the American Standard for Nursery Stock (ANSI Z60.1). Trees which are diseased, damaged, exhibit irregular or undesirable branching, habit or form and trees with a cut or dead leader shall not be utilized.
[Added 11-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-66]

§ 130-70 Sidewalks.

[Amended 10-8-1988 by Ord. No. 88-83; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 3-7-1989 by Ord. No. 89-25; 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
A. 
Nonresidential development. Sidewalks shall be required, except in the PA, PV and FA Zones. Sidewalks shall be at least four inches thick of Class B concrete having a twenty-eight-day compressive strength of 4,500 pounds per square inch. Expansion joints shall be provided at twenty-foot intervals in sidewalks, with construction joints at four-foot intervals. Expansion joints shall also be provided at all points where sidewalks intersect or abut concrete drive aprons and at all points where concrete drive aprons abut curbing. Concrete drive aprons shall have a thickness of at least six inches and shall be of Class B concrete having a twenty-eight-day compressive strength of 4,500 pounds per square inch and shall be air-entrained. Such driveway aprons shall be reinforced with six inches by six inches of 10/10 welded steel wire mesh. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 5.[1])
[1]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 5, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
B. 
Residential Development.
(1) 
Sidewalks and graded areas shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Subchapter 4 (Streets and Parking) of N.J.A.C. 5:21 (Residential Site Improvement Standards), as amended.
(2) 
Driveway aprons are required in residential developments and shall be constructed in accordance with the specifications of this chapter.

§ 130-71 Sight triangles; nonresidential development.

[Amended 9-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-74; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 3-7-1989 by Ord. No. 89-25; 1-17-1994 by Ord. No. 94-15; 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51; 11-5-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-99; 5-4-2010 by Ord. No. 2010-16]
A. 
Sight triangles shall be required at each quadrant of an intersection of streets and streets and driveways. The area within the sight triangles shall be maintained as part of the lot adjoining the street and set aside on any subdivision or site plan as a sight triangle easement. Within a sight triangle, no grading, planting or structure shall be erected or maintained between 30 inches and 84 inches above the center-line grade of each street or driveway intersection, excluding utility poles, street name signs and official traffic regulation signs. Where any street or driveway intersection involves earth banks or vegetation, including trees, the developer shall trim such vegetation and trees, as well as establish proper excavation and grading, to provide the sight triangle. Trees within a sight triangle or distance area shall be of sufficient size to be pruned to a seven-foot branching height upon planting. Planting within a sight triangle or distance area must be approved by the Township Engineer.
B. 
The sight point along the minor roadway shall be located 15 feet behind the extended edge of pavement of the major road in the center of the approaching travel lane. The sight point along a driveway shall be located 10 feet behind the extended edge of pavement of the intersecting road in the center of the approaching travel lane.
C. 
The "sight triangle" is that area inside the straight line connecting the sight point on the minor road with the center of the approaching travel lane along the major roadway. The length of the straight line between shall be dependent on the speed limit of the intersecting roadway and shall be as detailed in Figure 6.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Figure 6, Sight Triangles, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
D. 
A sight triangle easement dedication shall be expressed on the plat as follows: "Sight triangle easement subject to grading, planting and construction restrictions as provided for in the Township Land Development Ordinance." Portions of the lot set aside for the sight triangle may be calculated in determining the lot area and may be included in establishing the minimum setbacks required by the zoning provisions.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 211, Zoning.

§ 130-71.1 Sight triangles, residential development.

[Added 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
Sight triangle easements shall be provided in accordance with Subchapter 4 (Streets and Parking) of N.J.A.C. 5:21 (Residential Site Improvement Standards), as amended.

§ 130-72 Grading, topsoil and seeding.

[Amended 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 4-18-1989 by Ord. No. 89-31; 8-1-1989 by Ord. No. 89-53; 9-3-1996 by Ord. No. 96-62; 3-2-2004 by Ord. No. 2004-22]
All lots, open spaces and planting areas shall be graded to secure proper drainage, to prevent the collection of stormwater and to prevent an adverse impact on adjacent properties. The grading shall be performed in a manner which will minimize the damage to or destruction of trees growing on the land. This shall include the installation of protective barriers, such as four-foot-high snow fence or silt fence along the drip line of the tree or at a distance of not less than four feet from shrubs and not less than 10 feet from trees. These barriers shall not be supported by the plants they are protecting, but shall be self-supporting. Topsoil shall be provided and/or redistributed on the surface as cover and shall be stabilized by seeding or planting. Gradings shall be designed to prevent or minimize drainage to structures or improvements when major storms, exceeding the design basis of the storm drainage system, occur. Grading plans shall have been submitted with the preliminary and final plats, and any departure from these plans must be approved in accordance with the requirements of this section for the modification of improvements.
A. 
Wherever possible, the land shall be graded so that the stormwater and surface drainage from each lot shall drain directly to the street and be diverted to a storm sewer conveyance or other approved point of collection so as to not create a hazard. If impossible to drain directly to the street, it shall be directed to a system of interior yard drainage designed in accordance with this chapter.
[Amended 1-20-2004 by Ord. No. 2004-10]
B. 
Unless otherwise required by this chapter, all tree stumps, masonry and other obstructions shall be removed to a depth of two feet below existing or finished grade, whichever is lower.
C. 
The minimum slope for lawns and disturbed areas shall be 1 1/2% and, for smooth, hard-finished surfaces other than roadways, 4/10 of 1 1/2%.
D. 
Lots shall be graded so as to drain surface water away from foundation walls. The grade away from foundation walls shall fall a minimum of six inches within the first 10 feet. Where lot lines, walls, slopes or other physical barriers prohibit six inches of fall within 10 feet, drains or swales shall be provided to ensure drainage away from the structure. The maximum grade for lawn and disturbed areas more than 10 feet from a building shall be 25%, except that for driveways, the maximum grade shall be 15%.
[Amended 12-17-1996 by Ord. No. 96-85; 1-20-2004 by Ord. No. 2004-10]
E. 
All roof leaders shall connect into a subsurface infiltration system in accordance with a detail entitled "Detail Residential Recharge Trench" on file with the Community Development office of the Township of Stafford. The builder shall have the option of submitting an alternate design for an infiltration system to the Township Engineer for review. The alternate design of a subsurface infiltration system shall be designed to retain the total runoff volume generated from any net increase in impervious surface created solely by the roof area of the building for the ten-year storm of twenty-four-hour duration, including credit for percolation. The side area of the subsurface infiltration system shall be the only area utilized in the percolation credit calculation. The rate of percolation shall be developed utilizing information contained in the Soil Survey of Ocean County New Jersey as prepared by the United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. Storm water runoff volume calculations shall be developed using an acceptable method of determining discharge, as defined in United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds, Technical Release No. 55, latest edition, for Type III storms. Curve numbers shall be computed weighted averages for proposed conditions and not typical residential values as published in Technical Release No. 55. Predevelopment curve numbers shall be computed for the tract prior to any development and shall be representative of good-condition pasture land or woodlands. Calculations shall be submitted on a form acceptable to the Township Engineer.
[Amended 12-17-1996 by Ord. No. 96-85]
F. 
Site grading and filling, if necessary, shall be performed such that the outside finished grade shall be above the crown of the roadway directly in front of the structure in accordance with the standards set forth in this section. All lots being filled shall be filled so as to allow complete surface draining of the lot to the street or natural drainage rights-of-way. No construction or regrading shall be permitted which creates or aggravates water stagnation, siltation or drainage problems on adjacent properties. Any topsoil disturbed during approved operations shall be redistributed throughout the site.
G. 
Sites requiring cuts or fills shall be designed with retaining walls and protective tile or masonry rings such that a minimum amount of trees will have to be removed in order to meet existing grades.
H. 
Retaining walls installed in slope-control areas shall be constructed of treated timber or logs, reinforced concrete, other reinforced masonry or of other construction acceptable to the Engineer and shall be adequately designed and detailed on the final plat to carry all earth pressures, including any surcharges. All retaining walls shall be constructed in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation.
I. 
The subdivider shall take all necessary precautions to prevent any siltation of streams during the construction of the subdivision. The subdivider shall provide adequate provisions to prevent all deposition of silt or other eroded material in any stream or watercourse. Such provisions may include but are not limited to construction and maintenance of siltation basins or holding ponds and diversion berms throughout the course of construction and planting areas.
J. 
All lots, open space and planting areas shall be seeded with a suitable stabilizing ground cover approved by the Township Engineer. On any waterfront lots or open spaces, the Board may allow a suitable stabilizing ground cover other than seeding if approved by the Township Engineer.
K. 
No topsoil shall be removed from the site or used as soil. Topsoil moved during the course of construction shall be redistributed so as to provide at least four inches of spread cover to all seeding and planting areas of the site and shall be stabilized by seeding or planting. In the event that the quantity of topsoil at the site is insufficient to provide four inches of cover for all seeding and planting areas, the developer shall provide and distribute a sufficient quantity of topsoil to provide such a cover. Topsoil shall be approved by the Township Engineer.
L. 
This section shall be applicable to all subdivisions, site plans and all individual dwelling unit(s) site disturbances.
M. 
If, in the opinion of the Township Engineer, the requirements of this section cannot be met, a certification from a licensed engineer setting forth an acceptable drainage and grading plan shall be necessary prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy.
N. 
The subsurface infiltration system shall be installed in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.13, entitled "Distances."
[Added 12-17-1996 by Ord. No. 96-85]

§ 130-73 Stormwater management.

A. 
Flooding in the Township of Stafford occurs infrequently because of the low-runoff-generating character of the soil and the extensive areas of wetlands which absorb the impact of runoff. However, as land is developed, the permeable soils are replaced by impermeable surfaces which increase runoff volumes. All future development in Stafford Township shall utilize the best available technology to minimize off-site stormwater runoff, increase on-site infiltration, simulate natural drainage systems and minimize off-site discharge of pollutants to ground- or surface water and encourage natural filtration functions.
B. 
The runoff-control methods shall be to prevent the rate of off-site stormwater runoff during the construction and operation of a development under any storm conditions from exceeding the rate of runoff that would occur under the existing predeveloped conditions.
[Amended 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101]
C. 
General. All streets shall be provided with stormwater inlets and pipes where the same may be necessary for proper surface drainage. The system shall be adequate to carry off and/or store the stormwater and natural drainage water which originates beyond the development boundaries and passes through the development, calculated on the basis of maximum potential development permitted. No stormwater runoff or natural drainage water shall be so diverted as to overload existing drainage systems or to create flooding or the need for additional drainage structures on other lands without proper and approved provisions being made for taking care of these conditions, including off-tract improvements.
D. 
The Township recognizes the adverse effect improperly managed stormwater can have on the environment and as such will treat a nonresidential development site as a closed system within which drainage systems must be designed using the best available technology to contain runoff and ground- and surface water pollution increases within the site in order to minimize off-site impacts.
[Added 6-23-1998 by Ord. No. 98-44]

§ 130-74 Stormwater management application. [1]

[Amended 6-23-1998 by Ord. No. 98-44]
A. 
Residential.
(1) 
All stormwater management for residential development west of the Garden State Parkway must comply with the RSIS as set forth in N.J.A.C. 5:21-7 et seq. and the Pinelands Area development requirements.
[Amended 12-6-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-105; 12-4-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-113]
(2) 
All stormwater management for residential development east of the Garden State Parkway must comply with the special area standards as set forth in N.J.A.C. 5:21-7 et seq.
B. 
Nonresidential.
(1) 
All stormwater management for nonresidential development west of the Garden State Parkway must comply with the requirements as set forth in § 130-74A(1) and the remainder of the stormwater management sections of this chapter except § 130-76.
[Amended 12-6-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-105]
(2) 
All stormwater management for nonresidential development east of the Garden State Parkway must comply with the requirements as set forth in § 130-74A(2) and the remainder of the stormwater management sections of this chapter except § 130-76.1.
[Amended 12-4-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-113]
[1]
Editor's Note: See also Appendix A of this chapter, Special Area Standards for Stormwater Management, which is included as an attachment to this chapter.

§ 130-75 General stormwater drainage requirements.

[Amended 1-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-76; 11-21-1989 by 89-66; 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101; 6-23-1998 by Ord. No. 98-44]
No drainage pipe or easement shall be permitted within 25 feet of any existing or proposed individual sewage disposal system. At least two fee zero inches of minimum cover over the top of the pipe at all times, including during construction, must be provided.

§ 130-76 Stormwater control.

[Added 12-6-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-105[1]]
A. 
Scope and purpose.
(1) 
Policy statement. Flood control, groundwater recharge and pollutant reduction through nonstructural or low-impact techniques shall be explored before relying on structural best management practices (BMP). Structural BMPs should be integrated with nonstructural stormwater management strategics and proper maintenance plans. Nonstructural strategies include both environmentally sensitive site design and source controls that prevent pollutants from being placed on the site or from being exposed to stormwater. To minimize the impact of development on the quality of the Township's groundwater resources and to limit the risk of contamination of the public water supply, nonstructural strategies must comply with the requirements set forth in § 130-83. Source control plans should be developed based upon physical site conditions and the origin, nature and the anticipated quantity or amount of potential pollutants. Development located in the WPO (Wellhead Protection Overlay) zone must comply with the requirements set forth in § 211-25.1. Multiple stormwater management BMPs may be necessary to achieve the established performance standards for water quality, quantity and groundwater recharge.
(2) 
Purpose. It is the purpose of this section to establish minimum stormwater management requirements and controls for "major development," as defined in Subsection B.
(3) 
Applicability.
(a) 
This section shall be applicable to all site plans and subdivisions for the following major developments that require preliminary or final site plan or subdivision review:
[1] 
Nonresidential major developments; and
[2] 
Aspects of residential major developments that are not preempted by the Residential Site Improvement Standards at N.J.A.C. 5:21.
(b) 
This section shall also be applicable to all major developments undertaken by the Township of Stafford east of the Garden State Parkway.
(4) 
Compatibility with other permit and ordinance requirements. Development approvals issued for subdivision and site plans pursuant to this section are to be considered an integral part of development approvals under the subdivision and site plan review process and do not relieve the applicant of the responsibility to secure required permits or approvals for activities regulated by any other applicable code, rule, act or ordinance. In their interpretation and application, the provisions of this section shall be held to be the minimum requirements for the promotion of the public health, safety and general welfare. This section is not intended to interfere with, abrogate or annul any other ordinance, rule or regulation, statute or other provision of law except that, where any provision of this section imposes restrictions different from those imposed by any other ordinance, rule or regulation or other provision of law, the more restrictive provisions or higher standards shall prevail.
B. 
Definitions. Unless specifically defined below, words or phrases used in this section shall be interpreted so as to give them the meaning they have in common usage and to give this section it's most reasonable application. The definitions below are the same as or based on the corresponding definitions in the Stormwater Management Rules at N.J.A.C. 7:8-1.2.
CAFRA CENTERS, CORES or NODES
Those areas within boundaries accepted by the Department pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:8E-5B.
CAFRA PLANNING MAP
The geographic depiction of the boundaries for Coastal Planning Areas, CAFRA Centers, CAFRA Cores and CAFRA Nodes pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:7E-5B.3.
COMPACTION
The increase in soil bulk density.
CORE
A pedestrian-oriented area of commercial and civic uses serving the surrounding municipality, generally including housing and access to public transportation.
COUNTY REVIEW AGENCY
An agency designed by the County Board of Chosen Freeholders to review municipal stormwater management plans and implementing ordinance(s). The county review agency may either be:
(1) 
A county planning agency; or
(2) 
A county water resource association created under N.J.S.A. 58:16A-55.5, if the ordinance or resolution delegates authority to approve, conditionally approve or disapprove municipal stormwater management plans and implementing ordinances.
DEPARTMENT
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
DESIGNATED CENTER
A state development and redevelopment plan center as designated by the State Planning Commission such as urban, regional, town, village or hamlet.
DESIGN ENGINEER
A person professionally qualified and duly licensed in New Jersey to perform engineering services that may include, but not necessarily be limited to, development of project requirements, creation and development of project design and preparation of drawings and specifications.
DEVELOPMENT
The division of a parcel of land into two or more parcels, the construction, reconstruction, conversion, structural alteration, relocation or enlargement of any building or structure, any mining excavation or landfill, and any use or change in the use of any building or other structure, or land or extension of use of land, by any person, for which permission is required under the Municipal Land Use Law, N.J.S.A. 40:55D-1 et seq. In the case of development of agricultural lands, development means: any activity that requires a state permit; any activity reviewed by the County Agricultural Board (CAB) and the State Agricultural Development Committee (SADC), and municipal review of any activity not exempted by the Right to Farm Act, N.J.S.A. 4:1C-1 et seq.
DRAINAGE AREA
A geographic area within which stormwater, sediments or dissolved materials drain to a particular receiving water body or to a particular point along a receiving water body.
EMPOWERMENT NEIGHBORHOOD
A neighborhood designated by the Urban Coordinating Council in consultation and conjunction with the New Jersey Redevelopment Authority pursuant to N.J.S.A. 55:19-69.
ENVIRONMENTALLY CRITICAL AREAS
An area or feature which is of significant environmental value, including but not limited to: stream corridors; natural heritage priority sites; habitat of endangered or threatened species; large areas of contiguous open space or upland forest; steep slopes; and wellhead protection and groundwater recharge areas. Habitats of endangered or threatened species are identified using the Department's Landscape Project as approved by the Department's Endangered and Nongame Species Program.
EROSION
The detachment and movement of soil or rock fragments by water, wind, ice or gravity.
FILTER MATERIAL
Washed gravel, crushed stone, slag or clean bank run gravel ranging in size from 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches free of dust, ashes or clay.
IMPERVIOUS SURFACE
A surface that has been covered with a layer of material so that it is highly resistant to infiltration by water.
INFILTRATION
The process by which water seeps into the soil from precipitation.
MAJOR DEVELOPMENT
Any development that provides for ultimately disturbing one or more acres of land or the total net increase of surface area of impervious coverage is equal to or greater than 0.25 acres. Disturbance for the purpose of this rule is the placement of impervious surface or exposure and/or movement of soil or bedrock or clearing, cutting or removing of vegetation.
MUNICIPALITY
Any city, borough, town, township or village.
NODE
Any area designated by the State Planning Commission concentrating facilities and activities which are not organized in a compact form.
NUTRIENT
A chemical element or compound, such as nitrogen or phosphorus, which is essential to, and promotes the development of, organisms.
PERSON
Any individual, corporation, company, partnership, firm, association, Township of Stafford or political subdivision of this state subject to municipal jurisdiction pursuant to the Municipal Land Use Law, N.J.S.A. 40:55D-1 et seq.
POLLUTANT
Any dredged spoil, solid waste, incinerator residue, filter backwash, sewage, garbage, refuse, oil, grease, sewage sludge, munitions, chemical wastes, biological materials, medical waste, radioactive substance [except those regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.)], thermal waste, wrecked or discarded equipment, rock, sand, cellar dirt, industrial, municipal, agricultural, and construction waste or runoff, or other residue discharged directly or indirectly to the land, groundwaters or surface waters of the state or to a domestic treatment works. Pollutant includes both hazardous and nonhazardous pollutants.
RECHARGE
The amount of water from precipitation that infiltrates into the ground and is not evapotranspired.
SEDIMENT
Solid material, mineral or organic, that is in suspension, is being transported or has been moved from its site of origin by air, water or gravity as a product of erosion.
SITE
The lot or lots upon which a major development is to occur or has occurred.
SUBSURFACE INFILTRATION SYSTEMS
A subsurface storage facility consisting of 360° perforated pipe enclosed in an envelope of filter material wrapped on top and sides with filter fabric that receives and temporarily stores stormwater runoff.
SOIL
All unconsolidated mineral and organic material of any origin.
STATE DEVELOPMENT AND REDEVELOPMENT PLAN METROPOLITAN PLANNING AREA (PA1)
An area delineated on the State Plan Policy Map and adopted by the State Planning Commission that is intended to be the focus for much of the state's future redevelopment and revitalization efforts.
STATE PLAN POLICY MAP
The geographic application of the State Development and Redevelopment Plan's goals and statewide policies, and the official map of these goals and policies.
STORMWATER
Water resulting from precipitation (including rain and snow) that runs off the land's surface, is transmitted to the subsurface or is captured by separate storm collection systems or other sewage or drainage facilities or conveyed by snow removal equipment.
STORMWATER RUNOFF
Water flow on the surface of the ground or in storm collection systems resulting from precipitation.
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT BASIN
An excavation or embankment and related areas designed to retain stormwater runoff. A stormwater management basin may either be normally dry (that is, a detention basin or infiltration basin), retain water in a permanent pool (a retention basin) or be planted mainly with wetland vegetation (most constructed stormwater wetlands).
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURE
Any structural or nonstructural strategy, practice, technology, process, program or other method intended to control or reduce stormwater runoff and associated pollutants or to induce or control the infiltration or groundwater recharge of stormwater or to eliminate illicit or illegal nonstormwater discharges into stormwater conveyances.
TIDAL FLOOD HAZARD AREA
A flood hazard area, which may be influenced by stormwater runoff from inland areas, but which is primarily caused by the Atlantic Ocean.
URBAN COORDINATING COUNCIL EMPOWERMENT NEIGHBORHOOD
A neighborhood given priority access to state resources through the New Jersey Redevelopment Authority.
URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONES
A zone designated by the New Jersey Enterprise Zone Authority pursuant to the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zones Act, N.J.S.A. 52:27H-60 et seq.
URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AREA
Previously developed portions of areas:
(1) 
Delineated on the State Plan Policy Map (SPPM) as the Metropolitan Planning Area (PA1), Designated Centers, Cores or Nodes;
(2) 
Designated as CAFRA Centers, Cores or Nodes;
(3) 
Designated as Urban Enterprise Zones; and
(4) 
Designated as Urban Coordinating Council Empowerment Neighborhoods.
WATERS OF THE STATE
The ocean and its estuaries, all springs, streams, wetlands and bodies of surface or ground water, whether natural or artificial, within the boundaries of the State of New Jersey or subject to its jurisdiction.
WETLANDS or WETLAND
An area that is inundated or saturated by surface water or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances does support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions, commonly known as "hydrophytic vegetation."
C. 
General standards; design and performance standards for stormwater management measures.
(1) 
Stormwater management measures for major development shall be developed to meet the erosion control, groundwater recharge, stormwater runoff quantity and stormwater runoff quality standards in Subsection D. To the maximum extent practicable, these standards shall be met by incorporating nonstructural stormwater management strategies into the design. If these strategies alone are not sufficient to meet these standards, structural stormwater management measures necessary to meet these standards shall be incorporated into the design.
(2) 
The standards in this section apply only to new major development and are intended to minimize the impact of stormwater runoff on water quality and water quantity in receiving water bodies and maintain groundwater recharge. The standards do not apply to new major development to the extent that alternative design and performance standards are applicable under a regional stormwater management plan or water quality management plan adopted in accordance with Department rules.
D. 
Stormwater management requirements for major development.
(1) 
The development shall incorporate a maintenance plan for the stormwater management measures incorporated into the design of a major development in accordance with Subsection I.
(2) 
Stormwater management measures shall avoid adverse impacts of concentrated flow on habitat for threatened and endangered species as documented in the Department's Landscape Project or Natural Heritage Database established under N.J.S.A. 13:1B-15.147 through 13:1B-15.150, particularly Helonias bullata (swamp pink) and/or Clemmys muhlnebergi (bog turtle).
(3) 
The following linear development projects are exempt from the groundwater recharge, stormwater runoff quantity and stormwater runoff quality requirements of Subsections D(6) and (7):
(a) 
The construction of an underground utility line, provided that the disturbed areas are revegetated upon completion;
(b) 
The construction of an aboveground utility line, provided that the existing conditions are maintained to the maximum extent practicable; and
(c) 
The construction of a public pedestrian access, such as a sidewalk or trail with a maximum width of 14 feet, provided that the access is made of permeable material.
(4) 
A waiver from strict compliance from the groundwater recharge, stormwater runoff quantity and stormwater runoff quality requirements of Subsections D(6) and (7) may be obtained for the enlargement of an existing public roadway or railroad or the construction or enlargement of a public pedestrian access, provided that the following conditions are met:
(a) 
The applicant demonstrates that there is a public need for the project that cannot be accomplished by any other means;
(b) 
The applicant demonstrates through an alternative analysis that, through the use of nonstructural and structural stormwater management strategies and measures, the option selected complies with the requirements of Subsections D(6) and (7) to the maximum extent practicable;
(c) 
The applicant demonstrates that, in order to meet the requirements of Subsections D(6) and (7), existing structures currently in use, such as homes and buildings, would need to be condemned; and
(d) 
The applicant demonstrates that it does not own or have other rights to areas, including the potential to obtain through condemnation lands not falling under Subsection D(4)(c) above within the upstream drainage area of the receiving stream, that would provide additional opportunities to mitigate the requirements of Subsections D(6) and (7) that were not achievable on site.
(5) 
Nonstructural stormwater management strategies.
(a) 
To the maximum extent practicable, the standards in Subsections D(6) and (7) shall be met by incorporating nonstructural stormwater management strategies set forth at Subsection D(5) into the design. The applicant shall identify the nonstructural measures incorporated into the design of the project. If the applicant contends that it is not feasible for engineering, environmental or safety reasons to incorporate any nonstructural stormwater management measures identified in Subsection D(5)(b) below into the design of a particular project, the applicant shall identify the strategy considered and provide a basis for the contention.
(b) 
Nonstructural stormwater management strategics incorporated into site design shall:
[1] 
Protect areas that provide water quality benefits or areas particularly susceptible to erosion and sediment loss.
[2] 
Minimize impervious surfaces and break up or disconnect the flow of runoff over impervious surfaces.
[3] 
Maximize the protection of natural drainage features and vegetation.
[4] 
Minimize the decrease in the time of concentration from preconstruction to postconstruction. "Time of concentration" is defined as the time it takes for runoff to travel from the hydraulically most distant point of the watershed to the point of interest within a watershed.
[5] 
Minimize land disturbance, including clearing and grading.
[6] 
Minimize soil compaction.
[7] 
Provide low-maintenance landscaping that encourages retention and planting of native vegetation and minimizes the use of lawns, fertilizers and pesticides.
[8] 
Provide vegetated open-channel conveyance systems discharging into and through stable vegetated areas.
[9] 
Provide other source controls to prevent or minimize the use or exposure of pollutants at the site in order to prevent or minimize the release of those pollutants into stormwater runoff. Such source controls include, but are not limited to:
[a] 
Site design features that help to prevent accumulation of trash and debris in drainage systems, including features that satisfy Subsection D(5)(c) below;
[b] 
Site design features that help to prevent discharge of trash and debris from drainage systems;
[c] 
Site design features that help to prevent and/or contain spills or other harmful accumulations of pollutants at industrial or commercial developments; and
[d] 
When establishing vegetation after land disturbance, applying fertilizer in accordance with the requirements established under the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, N.J.S.A. 4:24-39 et seq., and implementing rules.
(c) 
Site design features identified under Subsection D(5)(b)[9][b] above shall comply with the following standard to control passage of solid and floatable materials through storm drain inlets. For purposes of this subsection, "solid and floatable materials" means sediment, debris, trash and other floating, suspended or settleable solids. For exemptions to this standard see Subsection D(5)(c)[3] below.
[1] 
Design engineers shall use either of the following grates whenever they use a grate in pavement or another ground surface to collect stormwater from that surface into a storm drain or surface water body under that grate:
[a] 
The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) bicycle safe grate, which is described in Chapter 2.4 of the NJDOT Bicycle Compatible Roadways and Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines (April 1996); or
[b] 
A different grate, if each individual clear space in that grate has an area of no more than 7.0 square inches or is no greater than 0.5 inches across the smallest dimension.
Examples of grates subject to this standard include grates in grate inlets, the grate portion (non-curbing-opening portion) of combination inlets, grates on storm collection system manholes, ditch grates, trench grates and grates of spacer bars in slotted drains. Examples of ground surfaces include surfaces of roads (including bridges), driveways, parking areas, bikeways, plazas, sidewalks, lawns, fields, open channels and stormwater basin floors.
[2] 
Whenever design engineers use a curb-opening inlet, the clear space in that curb opening (or each individual clear space, if the curb opening has two or more clear spaces) shall have an area of no more than 7.0 square inches or be no greater than 2.0 inches across the smallest dimension.
[3] 
This standard does not apply:
[a] 
Where the review agency determines that this standard would cause inadequate hydraulic performance that could not practicably be overcome by using additional or larger storm drain inlets that meet these standards;
[b] 
Where flows from the water quality design storm as specified in Subsection D(7)(a) are conveyed through any device (e.g., end of pipe netting facility, manufactured treatment device or a catch basin hood) that is designed, at a minimum, to prevent delivery of all solid and floatable materials that could not pass through one of the following:
[i] 
A rectangular space 4 5/8 inches long and 1 1/2 inches wide (this option does not apply for outfall netting facilities); or
[ii] 
A bar screen having a bar spacing of 0.5 inches;
[iii] 
Where flows are conveyed through a trash rack that has parallel bars with one-inch spacing between the bars, to the elevation of the water quality design storm as specified in Subsection D(7)(a); or
[iv] 
Where the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection determines, pursuant to the New Jersey Register of Historic Places Rules at N.J.A.C. 7:4-7.2(c), that action to meet this standard is an undertaking that constitutes an encroachment or will damage or destroy the New Jersey Register listed historic property.
(d) 
Any land area used as a nonstructural stormwater management measure to meet the performance standards in Subections D(6) and (7) shall be dedicated to a government agency, subjected to a conservation restriction filed with the appropriate County Clerk's office or subject to an approved equivalent restriction that ensures that measure or an equivalent stormwater management measure approved by the reviewing agency is maintained in perpetuity.
(e) 
Guidance for nonstructural stormwater management strategies is available in the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual. The BMP Manual may be obtained from the address identified in Subsection G or found on the Department's website at www.njstormwater.org.
(6) 
Erosion control, groundwater recharge and runoff quantity standards. This subsection contains minimum design and performance standards to control erosion, encourage and control infiltration and groundwater recharge and control stormwater runoff quantity impacts of major development.
(a) 
The minimum design and performance standards for erosion control are these established under the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, N.J.S.A. 4:24-39 et seq., and implementing rules.
(b) 
The minimum design and performance standards for groundwater recharge are as follows:
[1] 
The design engineer shall, using assumptions and factors for stormwater runoff and groundwater recharge calculations at Subsection E, either:
[a] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that the site and its stormwater management measures maintain 100% of the average annual preconstruction groundwater recharge volume for the site; or
[b] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that the increase of stormwater runoff volume from preconstruction to postconstruction for the two-year storm is infiltrated.
[2] 
This groundwater recharge requirement does not apply to projects within the urban redevelopment area or to projects subject to Subsection D(6)(b)[3] below.
[3] 
The following types of stormwater shall not be recharged:
[a] 
Stormwater from areas of high pollutant loading. "High pollutant loading areas" are areas in industrial and commercial developments where solvents and/or petroleum products are loaded/unloaded, stored or applied; areas where pesticides are loaded/unloaded or stored; areas where hazardous materials are expected to be present in greater than "reportable quantities" as defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at 40 CFR 302.4; areas where recharge would be inconsistent with Department-approved remedial action work plan or landfill closure plan and areas with high risks for spills of toxic materials, such as gas stations and vehicle maintenance facilities; and
[b] 
Industrial stormwater exposed to source material. "Source material" means any material(s) or machinery, located at an industrial facility that is directly or indirectly related to process, manufacturing or other industrial activities, which could be a source of pollutants in any industrial stormwater discharge to groundwater. Source materials include, but are not limited to, raw materials; intermediate products; final products; waste materials; by-products; industrial machinery and fuels; and lubricants, solvents and detergents that are related to process, manufacturing or other industrial activities that are exposed to stormwater.
[4] 
The design engineer shall assess the hydraulic impact on the groundwater table and design the site so as to avoid adverse hydraulic impacts. Potential adverse hydraulic impacts include, but are not limited to, exacerbating a naturally or seasonally high water table so as to cause surficial ponding, flooding of basements or interference with the proper operation of subsurface sewage disposal systems and other subsurface structures in the vicinity or downgradient of the groundwater recharge area.
(c) 
In order to control stormwater runoff quantity impacts, the design engineer shall, using the assumptions and factors for stormwater runoff calculations at Subsection E, complete the following:
[1] 
Open ended, underground infiltration systems shall be provided to handle stormwater runoff. They shall store the difference between the postdevelopment and the predevelopment runoff for the one-hundred-year, twenty-four-hour storm.
[a] 
Where high water table, soil permeability or configuration of the site make infiltration impractical, the Township may approve a combination system or waive this requirement.
[b] 
Where the soil infiltration rate is less than 0.50 inches per hour, then other methods of stormwater runoff control shall be used.
[c] 
Where a combination system is permitted, it should be designed in accordance with the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual. In designing the combination stormwater management system for a particular project, the existing physical site conditions shall be carefully considered. Slopes, depth to seasonal high water table relative to proposed grades, soil type, texture and permeability of the watershed area and the site are all critical to the selection of a suitable combination of stormwater management techniques.
[d] 
Where a combination system is used, it shall be designed to provide nonpoint source pollutant removal efficiencies equivalent to the underground system when evaluated in accordance with the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual.
[e] 
Where detention is permitted by this section, it shall be designed to store the difference between the postdevelopment runoff and the predevelopment runoff, less the amount infiltrated by the underground system and any appropriate credits for percolation and infiltration associated with any other measures employed in the system and the postpeak percolation credit. Detention and rate of discharge control shall not be required on any site where the discharge will be to tidal waters which includes:
[i] 
All water bodies named on the U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic maps as "bays," "canals," "coves," "guts," "harbors," "inlets," "sounds," "thoroughfares," "channels."
[ii] 
Any man-made lagoons and canals discharging into the water bodies listed above.
[iii] 
All sections of the intercoastal waterway.
[iv] 
All watercourses not specifically identified in Subsection D(6)(c)[1][e][i], [ii] or [iii] above that flow into the tidal water bodies listed above, upstream to the first bridge or culvert or upstream to the point where one-hundred-year design flood exceeds the one-hundred-year tidal elevation, whichever is closest to the mouth.
[f] 
The stormwater management system, whether subsurface, surface, or a combination thereof, shall be designed to fully contain the design storm or to infiltrate it as required by this section. All stormwater management systems shall be designed and maintained such that all runoff will be recharged and/or discharged within 72 hours of the end of the storm event.
[g] 
Discharge of runoff into lakes, ponds, reservoirs and wetlands is discouraged as these sites have severely limited ability to flush pollutants, owing to limited fresh water flow and lack of tidal inundation.
[h] 
Discharge, where required, shall be designed to ensure stability of the stream or other body of water into which discharge is made at a rate discharge calculated for the full one-hundred-year, twenty-four-hour storm, without taking credit for amounts infiltrated, in order to limit the potential for downstream erosion.
[i] 
The construction of any facility utilized to control on-site runoff or drainage shall be designed to create a natural and aesthetically pleasing environment. Plans and soil native to the area shall be used for landscaping, to the maximum extent feasible. Special preference should be given to those species of trees and plants which have known pollutant-removal abilities. When other ornamental plants are used, they shall be types compatible with the natural environment.
[j] 
Where depth to groundwater or other physical conditions preclude the use of subsurface or surface infiltration and recharge as required by this section, then the applicant may request an exception. Any such request for an exception shall be accompanied by an engineering report explaining in detail why an exception is required and including all of the information required by this section which demonstrates the maximum feasible degree of compliance with these requirements.
[k] 
Subsurface infiltration systems shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the following requirements:
[i] 
All inlets from which collected runoff is conveyed to a subsurface infiltration system shall be equipped with oil/grease and sediment separators designed in accordance with the standard detail, which is Figure 8,[2] Basin with trap when required, to this chapter.
[2]
Editor's Note: Figure 8 is included as an attachment to this chapter.
[ii] 
All subsurface infiltration systems shall conform to the detail for trench recharge systems, which is Figure 9[3] to this chapter, and shall conform to the following requirements:
[A] 
Filter material shall cover the subsurface infiltration systems and extend the full width of the trench or bed, shall not be less than 12 inches deep beneath the bottom of the distribution line and shall extend at least six inches above the top of the line. The filter material shall be washed gravel, crushed stone, slag or clean bank-run gravel ranging in size from 1 1/2 inches to 2 1/2 inches; free of fines, dust, ashes or clay. If used in the calculations of storage capacity, the void volume of the stone shall be considered as 40%. The filter material shall be installed within an envelope of filter fabric of such mesh designed to inhibit migration of fines through the fabric. The fabric shall be installed along the sides and top of the trench. Fabric is not required on the bottom of the trench.
[B] 
Perforated pipe shall be constructed true to line and grade with open joints or perforations, except that at least one tight joint at each bend or other fitting shall be provided to prevent slippage. Bell-and-spigot pipe shall be laid with one-half-inch open joints at two-foot intervals, and the bottom of each joint shall contain a minimum of cement mortar to maintain an even flow line. For single-wall pipe only, perforated pipe shall be wrapped with filter fabric such as mesh design to inhibit migration of fines through the fabric and into the filter material.
[C] 
Perforated pipe shall not be laid at depths less then 24 inches below finished grade. The bottom of the trench may be deepened to within two feet of the seasonal high-water tables or bedrock.
[D] 
Excavation for disposal beds or trenches may be made by machinery, provided that the adjacent soil will not be compacted. No excavation machinery shall be permitted in the excavation. When an excavation is carried below the required depth, it shall be brought up to the proper elevation with filter material, as specified in this standard.
[E] 
The subsurface infiltration system shall be designed to provide a minimum three-foot separation between the bottom of the system and the seasonal high water table. There may be a lesser separation when it is demonstrated that the separation, either due to soil conditions or when considered in combination with other stormwater management techniques, is adequate to protect groundwater quality.
[F] 
Subsurface infiltration systems shall not be constructed over impervious ground formations where such formations are less than 10 feet below the bottom elevation of the filter material of the subsurface infiltration system.
[G] 
Subsurface infiltration systems shall not be built up by fill to more than two feet, unless an adequate grading plan has been approved. When subsurface infiltration systems are built up by fill to a depth exceeding two feet, the area of such fill shall extend at least 20 feet beyond the limits of subsurface infiltration systems, and the fill shall be of earth having a percolation value approximately equal to that of the ground over which the fill is placed. The percolation rates used for the design of a system infill shall be the volume found in the ground over which the fill is placed.
[H] 
When perforated pipe must be laid with changes in either horizontal or vertical alignment, manholes must be installed at each changed alignment.
[I] 
The percolating area of subsurface infiltration systems shall be considered as the total side area of the system in square feet, except that any section of trench containing pipe laid with tight joints other then fittings as required in this section shall not be considered in determining the percolating areas. Bottom or top areas shall not be included.
[J] 
Catch basin inlets or manholes shall be constructed at the end of each subsurface infiltration system and at intervals not to exceed 600 feet. Catch basins shall be perforated bottoms or sumps.
[K] 
Precast concrete leaching pits are permitted for use as subsurface infiltration systems in site plans. When used, each pit shall include a manhole cover and frame to permit access.
[L] 
The overflow structure in the terminus manhole shall be removable to facilitate maintenance.
[3]
Editor's Note: Figure 9 is included as an attachment to this chapter.
[l] 
The maintenance of the subsurface infiltration system shall comply with the requirements of § 130-79.
(d) 
Where the Township has either approved a combination system or waived the underground infiltration system requirement as set forth in Subsection D(6)(c) in order to control stormwater runoff quantity impacts, the design engineer shall, using the assumptions and factors for stormwater runoff calculations set forth in Subsection E, complete one of the following:
[1] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that for stormwater leaving the site, postconstruction runoff hydrographs for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storm events do not exceed, at any point in time, the preconstruction runoff hydrographs for the same storm events;
[2] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that there is no increase, as compared to the preconstruction condition, in the peak runoff rates of stormwater leaving the site for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storm events and the increased volume or change in timing of stormwater runoff will not increase flood damage at or downstream of the site. This analysis shall include the analysis of impacts of existing land uses and projected land uses assuming full development under existing zoning and land use ordinances in the drainage area;
[3] 
Design stormwater management measures so that the postconstruction peak runoff rates for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storm events are 50%, 75%, and 80%, respectively, of the preconstruction peak runoff rates. The percentages apply only to the postconstruction stormwater runoff that is attributable to the portion of the site on which the proposed development or project is to be constructed. The percentages shall not be applied to postconstruction stormwater runoff into tidal flood hazard areas if the increased volume of stormwater runoff will not increase flood damages below the point of discharge; or
[4] 
Design of wet ponds as a stormwater management measure shall establish a complete ecosystem capable of supporting a healthy aquatic habitat.
[5] 
In tidal flood hazard areas, stormwater runoff quantity analysis in accordance with Subsections D(6)(d)[1], [2] and [3] above shall only be applied if the increased volume of stormwater runoff could increase flood damages below the point of discharge.
(e) 
Any application for a new agricultural development that meets the definition of major development at Subsection B shall be submitted to the appropriate soil conservation district for review and approval in accordance with the requirements of this section and any applicable soil conservation district guidelines for stormwater runoff quantity and erosion control. For the purposes of this section, "agricultural development" means land uses normally associated with the production of food, fiber and livestock for sale. Such uses do not include the development of land for the processing or sale of food and the manufacturing of agriculturally related products.
(7) 
Stormwater runoff quality standards.
(a) 
Stormwater management measures shall be designed to reduce the postconstruction load of total suspended solids (TSS) in stormwater runoff generated from the water quality design storm by 80% of the anticipated load from the developed site, expressed as an annual average. Stormwater management measures shall only be required for water quality control if a net increase of 1/4 acre of impervious surface is being proposed or a total of one or more acres of disturbance occur on a development site. The requirement to reduce TSS does not apply to any stormwater runoff in a discharge regulated under a numeric effluent limitation for TSS imposed under the New Jersey Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NJDES) rules, N.J.A.C. 7:14A, or in a discharge specifically exempt under a NJDES permit from this requirement. The water quality design storm is 1.25 inches of rainfall in two hours. Water quality calculations shall take into account the distribution of rain from the water quality design storm, as reflected in Table 1. The calculation of the volume of runoff may take into account the implementation of nonstructural and structural stormwater management measures. The requirements to reduce TSS does not apply to any stormwater runoff in a discharge regulated under a numeric effluent limitation for TSS imposed under the New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) rules, N.J.A.C. 7:14A, or in a discharge specifically exempt under a NJPDES permit from this requirement. The water quality design storm is 1.25 inches of rainfall in two hours. Water quality calculations shall take into account the distribution of rain from the water quality design storm, as reflected in Table 1 below. The calculation of the volume of runoff may take into account the implementation of nonstructural and structural stormwater management measures.
Table 1: Water Quality Design Storm Distribution
Time
(minutes)
Cumulative
Rainfall
(inches)
Time
(Minutes)
Cumulative
Rainfall
(inches)
0
0.0000
65
0.8917
5
0.0083
70
0.9917
10
0.0166
75
1.0500
15
0.0250
80
1.0840
20
0.0500
85
1.1170
25
0.0750
90
1.1500
30
0.1000
95
1.1750
35
0.1330
100
1.2000
40
0.1660
105
1.2250
45
0.2000
110
1.2334
50
0.2583
115
1.2417
55
0.3583
120
1.2500
60
0.6250
(b) 
For purposes of TSS reduction calculations, Table 2 below presents the presumed removal rates for certain BMPs designed in accordance with the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual. The BMP Manual may be obtained from the address identified in Subsection G or found on the Department's website at www.njstormwater.org. The BMP Manual and other sources of technical guidance are listed in Subsection G. TSS reduction shall be calculated based on the removal rates for the BMPs in Table 2 below. Alternative removal rates and methods of calculating removal rates may be used if the design engineer provides documentation demonstrating the capability of these alternative rates and methods to the review agency. A copy of any approved alternative rate or method of calculating the removal rate shall be provided to the Department at the following address: Division of Watershed Management, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, P.O. Box 418, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0418.
(c) 
If more than one BMP in a series is necessary to achieve the required eighty-percent TSS reduction for a site, the applicant shall utilize the following formula to calculate TSS reduction:
R
=
A + B - (A * B)/100
WHERE
R
=
total TSS percent load removal from application of both BMPs, and
A
=
total TSS percent removal rate applicable to the first BMP
B
=
the TSS percent removal rate applicable to the second BMP
TABLE 2: TSS REMOVAL RATES FOR BMPs
Best Management Practice
TSS Percent Removal Rate
Bioretention systems
90
Constructed stormwater wetland
90
Extended detention basin
40 to 60
Infiltration structure
80
Manufactured treatment device
See Subsection F(3)
Sand filter
80
Vegetative filter strip
60 to 80
Wet pond
50 to 90
Subsurface infiltration system
80
(d) 
If there is more than one on-site drainage area, the eighty-percent TSS removal rate shall apply to each drainage area, unless the runoff from the subareas converge on site in, which case the removal rate can be demonstrated through a calculation using a weighted average.
(e) 
Stormwater management measures shall also be designed to reduce, to the maximum extent feasible, the postconstruction nutrient load of the anticipated load from the developed site in stormwater runoff generated from the water quality design storm. In achieving reduction of nutrients to the maximum extent feasible, the design of the site shall include nonstructural strategies and structural measures that optimize nutrient removal while sill achieving the performance standards in Subsections D(6) and (7).
(f) 
Additional information and examples are contained in the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual, which may be obtained from the address identified in Section G.
(g) 
In accordance with the definition of FW1 at N.J.A.C. 7:9B-1.4, stormwater management measures shall be designed to prevent any increase in stormwater runoff to waters classified as FW1.
(h) 
Special water resource protection areas shall be established along all waters designated Category One at N.J.A.C. 7:9B, and perennial or intermittent streams that drain into or upstream of the Category One waters as shown on the USGS Quadrangle Maps or in the County Soil Surveys, within the associated HUC14 drainage area. These areas shall be established for the protection of water quality, aesthetic value, exceptional ecological significance, exceptional recreational significance, exceptional water supply significance and exceptional fisheries significance of those established Category One waters. These areas shall be designated and protected as follows:
[1] 
The applicant shall preserve and maintain a special water resource protection area in accordance with one of the following:
[a] 
A three-hundred-foot special water resource protection area shall be provided on each side of the waterway, measured perpendicular to the waterway from the top of the bank outwards or from the center line of the waterway where the bank is not defined, consisting of existing vegetation or vegetation allowed to follow natural successions is provided.
[b] 
Encroachment within the designated special water resource protection area under Subsection D(7)(h)[1][a] above shall only be allowed where previous development or disturbance has occurred (for example, active agricultural use, parking area or maintained lawn area). The encroachment shall only be allowed if the applicant demonstrates that the functional value and overall condition of the special water resource protection area will be maintained to the maximum extent practicable. In no case shall the remaining special water resource protection area be reduced to less than 150 feet as measured perpendicular to the top of bank of the waterway or center line of the waterway where the bank is undefined. All encroachments proposed under this subsection shall be subject to review and approval by the Department.
[2] 
All stormwater shall be discharged outside of and flow through the special water resource protection area and shall comply with the standard for off-site stability in the Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey, established under the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, N.J.S.A. 4:24-39 et seq.
[3] 
If stormwater discharged outside of and flowing through the special water resource protection area cannot comply with the Standard for off-site stability in the Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey, established under the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, N.J.S.A. 4:24-39 et seq., then the stabilization measures in accordance with the requirements of the above standards may be placed within the special water resource protection area, provided that:
[a] 
Stabilization measures shall not be placed within 150 feet of the Category One waterway;
[b] 
Stormwater associated with discharges allowed by this section shall achieve a ninety-five-percent TSS postconstruction removal rate;
[c] 
Temperature shall be addressed to ensure no impact on the receiving waterway;
[d] 
The encroachment shall only be allowed where the applicant demonstrates that the functional value and overall condition of the special water resource protection area will be maintained to the maximum extent practicable;
[e] 
A conceptual project design meeting shall be held with the appropriate Department staff and soil conservation district staff to identify necessary stabilization measures; and
[f] 
All encroachments proposed under this section shall be subject to review and approval by the Department.
[4] 
A stream corridor protection plan may be developed by a regional stormwater management planning committee as an element of a regional stormwater management plan, or by a municipality through an adopted municipal stormwater management plan. If a stream corridor protection plan for a waterway subject to Subsection D(7)(h) has been approved by the Department of Environmental Protection, then the provisions of the plan shall be the applicable special water resource protection area requirements for the waterway. A stream corridor protection plan for a waterway subject to Subsection D(7)(h) shall maintain or enhance the current functional value and overall condition of the special water resource protection area as defined in Subsection D(7)(h)[1][a] above. In no case shall a stream corridor protection plan allow the reduction of the special water resource protection area to less than 150 feet as measured perpendicular to the waterway subject to this subsection.
[5] 
Subsection D(7)(h) does not apply to the construction of one individual single-family dwelling that is not part of a larger development on a lot receiving preliminary or final subdivision approval on or before February 2, 2004, provided that the construction begins on or before February 2, 2009.
E. 
Calculation of stormwater runoff and groundwater recharge.
(1) 
Stormwater runoff shall be calculated in accordance with the following:
(a) 
The design engineer shall calculate runoff using one of the following methods:
[1] 
The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) methodology, including the NRCS Runoff Equation and Dimensionless Unit Hydrograph, as described in the NRCS National Engineering Handbook Section 4 - Hydrology and Technical Release 55 - Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds; or
[2] 
The Rational Method for peak flow and the Modified Rational Method for hydrograph computations.
(b) 
For the purpose of calculating runoff coefficients and groundwater recharge, there is a presumption that the preconstruction condition of a site or portion thereof is a wooded land use with good hydrologic condition. The term "runoff coefficient" applies to both the NRCS methodology at Subsection E(1)(a)[1] and the Rational and Modified Rational Methods at Subsection E(l)(a)[2]. A runoff coefficient or a groundwater recharge land cover for an existing condition may be used on all or a portion of the site if the design engineer verified that the hydrologic condition has existed on the site or portion of the site for at least five years without interruption prior to the time of application. If more than one land cover have existed on the site during the five years immediately prior to the time of application, the land cover with the lowest runoff potential shall be used for the computations. In addition, there is the presumption that the site is in good hydrologic condition (if the land use type is pasture, lawn or park) with good cover (if the land use type is woods) or with good hydrologic condition and conservation treatment (if the land use type is cultivation).
(c) 
In computing preconstruction stormwater runoff, the design engineer shall account for all significant land features and structures, such as ponds, wetlands, depressions, hedgerows, or culverts that may reduce preconstruction stormwater runoff rates and volumes.
(d) 
In computing stormwater runoff from all design storms, the design engineer shall consider the relative stormwater runoff rates and/or volumes of pervious and impervious surfaces separately to accurately compute the rates and volume of stormwater runoff from the site. To calculate runoff from unconnected impervious cover, urban impervious area modifications as described in the NRCS Technical Release 55 - Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds and other methods may be employed.
(e) 
If the invert of the outlet structure of a stormwater management measure is below the flood hazard design flood elevation as defined in N.J.A.C. 7:13, the design engineer shall take into account the effects of tailwater in the design of structural stormwater management measures.
(2) 
Groundwater recharge may be calculated in accordance with the following: the New Jersey Geological Survey Report GSR-32 A Method for Evaluating Ground-Water Recharge Areas in New Jersey, incorporated herein by reference as amended and supplemented. Information regarding the methodology is available from the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual, at http://www.state.nj.us/dep/njgs/, or at New Jersey Geological Survey, 29 Arctic Parkway, P.O. Box 427, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0427; (609) 984-6587.
F. 
Standards for structural stormwater management measures.
(1) 
Standards for structural stormwater management measures are as follows:
(a) 
Structural stormwater management measures shall be designed to take into account the existing site conditions, including, for example, environmentally critical areas, wetlands; flood-prone areas; slopes; depth to seasonal high water table; soil type, permeability and texture; drainage area and drainage patterns; and the presence of solution-prone carbonate rocks (limestone).
(b) 
Structural stormwater management measures shall be designed to minimize maintenance, facilitate maintenance and repairs and ensure proper functioning. Trash racks shall be installed at the intake to the outlet structure, as appropriate, and shall have parallel bars with one-inch spacing between the bars to the elevation of the water quality design storm. For elevations higher than the water quality design storm, the parallel bars at the outlet structure shall be spaced no greater than 1/3 of the width of the diameter of the orifice or 1/3 the width of the weir, with a minimum spacing between bars of one inch and a maximum spacing between bars of six inches. in addition, the design of trash racks must comply with the requirements of Subsection H(4).
(c) 
Structural stormwater management measures shall be designed, constructed and installed to be strong, durable and corrosion resistant. Measures that are consistent with the relevant portions of the Residential Site Improvement Standards at N.J.A.C. 5:21-7.3, 5:21-7.4 and 5:21-7.5 shall be deemed to meet this requirement.
(d) 
At the intake to the outlet from the stormwater management basin, the orifice size shall be a minimum of 2 1/2 inches in diameter.
(e) 
Stormwater management basins shall be designed to meet the minimum safety standards for stormwater management basins at Subsection H.
(2) 
Stormwater management measure guidelines are available in the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual. Other stormwater management measures may be utilized, provided the design engineer demonstrates that the proposed measure and its design will accomplish the required water quantity, groundwater recharge and water quality design and performance standards established by Subsection D of this section.
(3) 
Manufactured treatment devices may be used to meet the requirements of Subsection D of this section, provided the pollutant removal rates are verified by the New Jersey Corporation for Advanced Technology and certified by the Department.
G. 
Sources for technical guidance.
(1) 
Technical guidance for stormwater management measures can be found in the documents listed at Subsections G(1)(a) and (b) below, which are available from Maps and Publications, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, 428 East State Street, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, New Jersey, 08625; telephone (609) 777-1038.
(a) 
Guidelines for stormwater management measures are contained in the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual, as amended. Information is provided on stormwater management measures such as bioretention systems, constructed stormwater wetlands, dry wells, extended detention basins, infiltration structures, manufactured treatment devices, pervious paving, sand filters, vegetative filter strips and wet ponds.
(b) 
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Stormwater Management Facilities Maintenance Manual, as amended.
(2) 
Additional technical guidance for stormwater management measures can be obtained from the following:
(a) 
The Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey promulgated by the State Soil Conservation Committee and incorporated into N.J.A.C. 2:90. Copies of these standards may be obtained by contacting the State Soil Conservation Committee or any of the soil conservation districts listed in N.J.A.C. 2:90-1.3(a)(4). The location, address and telephone number of each soil conservation district may be obtained from the State Soil Conservation Committee, P.O. Box 330, Trenton, New Jersey 08625; (609) 292-5540;
(b) 
The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Service, (732) 932-9306; and
(c) 
The soil conservation districts listed in N.J.A.C. 2:90-1.3(a)(4). The location, address and telephone number of each soil conservation district may be obtained from the State Soil Conservation Committee, P.O. Box 330, Trenton, New Jersey 08625; (609) 292-5540.
H. 
Safety standards for stormwater management basins.
(1) 
This subsection sets forth requirements to protect public safety through the proper design and operation of stormwater management basins. This subsection applies to any new stormwater management basin.
(2) 
Requirements for trash racks, overflow grates and escape provisions.
(a) 
A "trash rack" is a device designed to catch trash and debris and prevent the clogging of outlet structures. Trash racks shall be installed at the intake to the outlet from the stormwater management basin to ensure proper functioning of the basin outlets in accordance with the following:
[1] 
The trash rack shall have parallel bars, with no greater than six-inch spacing between the bars.
[2] 
The trash rack shall be designed so as not to adversely affect the hydraulic performance of the outlet pipe or structure.
[3] 
The average velocity of flow through a clean trash rack is not to exceed 2.5 feet per second under the full range of stage and discharge. Velocity is to be computed based on the next area of opening through the rack.
[4] 
The trash rack shall be constructed and installed to be rigid, durable and corrosion resistant and shall be designed to withstand a perpendicular live loading of 300 lbs./ft sq.
(b) 
An overflow grate is designed to prevent obstruction of the overflow structure. If an outlet structure has an overflow grate, such grate shall meet the following requirements:
[1] 
The overflow grate shall be secured to the outlet structure but removable for emergencies and maintenance.
[2] 
The overflow grate spacing shall be no less than two inches across the smallest dimension.
[3] 
The overflow grate shall be constructed and installed to be rigid, durable and corrosion resistant and shall be designed to withstand a perpendicular live loading of 300 lbs./ft sq.
(c) 
For purposes of this Subsection H(2)(c), "escape provisions" means the permanent installation of ladders, steps, rungs or other features that provide easily accessible means of egress from stormwater management basins. Stormwater management basins shall include escape provisions as follows:
[1] 
If a stormwater management basin has an outlet structure, escape provisions shall be incorporated in or on the structure. With the prior approval of the reviewing agency identified in Subsection H(3), a freestanding outlet structure may be exempted from this requirement.
[2] 
Safety ledges shall be constructed on the slopes of all new stormwater management basins having a permanent pool of water deeper than 2 1/2 feet. Such safety ledges shall be comprised of two steps. Each step shall be four feet to six feet in width. One step shall be located approximately 2 1/2 feet below the permanent water surface, and the second step shall be located one foot to 1 1/2 feet above the permanent water surface. See Subsection H(4) for an illustration of safety ledges in a stormwater management basin.
[3] 
In new stormwater management basins, the maximum interior slope for an earthen dam, embankment or berm shall not be steeper than three horizontal to one vertical.
(3) 
Variance or exemption from safety standards. A variance or exemption from the safety standards for stormwater management basins may be granted only upon a written finding by the appropriate reviewing agency (municipality, county or Department) that the variance or exemption will not constitute a threat to public safety.
(4) 
Illustration of safety ledges in a new stormwater management basin.
Depicted in An Elevation View
I. 
Requirements for a site development stormwater plan.
(1) 
Submission of site development stormwater plan.
(a) 
Whenever an applicant seeks municipal approval of a development subject to this section, the applicant shall submit all of the required components of the checklist for the site development stormwater plan at Subsection I(3) below as part of the submission of the applicant's application for subdivision or site plan approval.
(b) 
The applicant shall demonstrate that the project meets the standards set forth in this section.
(c) 
The applicant shall submit 16 copies of the materials listed in the checklist for site development stormwater plans in accordance with Subsection I(3) of this section.
(2) 
Site development stormwater plan approval. The applicant's site development project shall be reviewed as a part of the subdivision or site plan review process by the municipal board or official from whom municipal approval is sought. That municipal board or official shall consult the engineer retained by the Planning and/or Zoning Board (as appropriate) to determine if all of the checklist requirements have been satisfied and to determine if the project meets the standards set forth in this section.
(3) 
Checklist requirements. The following information shall be required:
(a) 
Topographic base map. The reviewing engineer may require upstream tributary drainage system information as necessary. It is recommended that the topographic base map of the site be submitted which extends a minimum of 200 feet beyond the limits of the proposed development, at a scale of one inch equals 200 feet or greater, showing two-foot contour intervals. The map, as appropriate, may indicate the following: existing surface water drainage, shorelines, steep slopes, soils, erodible soils, perennial or intermittent streams that drain into or upstream of the Category One waters, wetlands and floodplains along with their appropriate buffer strips, marshlands and other wetlands, pervious or vegetative surfaces, existing man-made structures, roads, bearing and distances of property lines, and significant natural and man-made features not otherwise shown.
(b) 
Environmental site analysis. A written and graphic description of the natural and man-made features of the site and its environs. This description should include a discussion of soil conditions, slopes, wetlands, waterways and vegetation on the site. Particular attention should be given to unique, unusual or environmentally sensitive features and to those that provide particular opportunities or constraints for development.
(c) 
Project description and site plan(s). A map (or maps) at the scale of the topographical base map indicating the location of existing and proposed buildings, roads, parking areas, utilities, structural facilities for stormwater management and sediment control and other permanent structures. The map(s) shall also clearly show areas where alterations occur in the natural terrain and cover, including lawns and other landscaping, and seasonal high groundwater elevations. A written description of the site plan and justification of proposed changes in natural conditions may also be provided.
(d) 
Land use planning and source control plan. This plan shall provide a demonstration of how the goals and standards of Subsections C through F are being met. The focus of this plan shall be to describe how the site is being developed to meet the objective of controlling groundwater recharge, stormwater quality and stormwater quantity problems at the source by land management and source controls whenever possible.
(e) 
Stormwater management facilities map. The following information, illustrated on a map of the same scale as the topographic base map, shall be included:
[1] 
Total area to be paved or built upon, proposed surface contours, land area to be occupied by the stormwater management facilities and the type of vegetation thereon and details of the proposed plan to control and dispose of stormwater.
[2] 
Details of all stormwater management facility designs, during and after construction, including discharge provisions, discharge capacity for each outlet at different levels of detention and emergency spillway provisions with maximum discharge capacity of each spillway.
(f) 
Calculations.
[1] 
Comprehensive hydrologic and hydraulic design calculations for the predevelopment and postdevelopment conditions for the design storms specified in Subsection D of this section.
[2] 
When the proposed stormwater management control measures (e.g., infiltration basins) depend on the hydrologic properties of soils, then a soils report shall be submitted. The soils report shall be based on on-site boring logs or soil pit profiles. The number and location of required soil borings or soil pits shall be determined based on what is needed to determine the suitability and distribution of soils present at the location of the control measure.
(g) 
Maintenance and repair plan. The design and planning of the stormwater management facility shall meet the maintenance requirements of Subsection J of this section.
(h) 
Waiver from submission requirements. The municipal official or board reviewing an application under this section may, in consultation with the Municipal Engineer, waive submission of any of the requirements in Subsection I(3)(a) through (f) of this section when it can be demonstrated that the information requested is impossible to obtain or it would create a hardship on the applicant to obtain and its absence will not materially affect the review process.
J. 
Maintenance and repair.
(1) 
Applicability. Projects subject to review as in Subsection A(3) of this section shall comply with the requirements of Subsections J(2) and (3).
(2) 
General maintenance.
(a) 
The design engineer shall prepare a maintenance plan for the stormwater management measures incorporated into the design of a major development.
(b) 
The maintenance plan shall contain specific preventative maintenance tasks and schedules; cost estimates, including estimated cost of sediment, debris or trash removal; and the name, address and telephone number of the person or persons responsible for preventative and corrective maintenance (including replacement). Maintenance guidelines for stormwater management measures are available in the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual. If the maintenance plan identifies a person other than the developer (for example, a public agency or homeowners' association) as having the responsibility for maintenance, the plan shall include documentation of such person's agreement to assume this responsibility or of the developer's obligation to dedicate a stormwater management facility to such person under an applicable ordinance or regulation.
(c) 
Responsibility for maintenance shall not be assigned or transferred to the owner or tenant of an individual property in a residential development or project unless such owner or tenant owns or leases the entire residential development or project.
(d) 
If the person responsible for maintenance identified under Subsection J(2)(b) above is not a public agency, the maintenance plan and any future revisions based on Subsection J(2)(g) below shall be recorded upon the deed of record for each property on which the maintenance described in the maintenance plan must be undertaken.
(e) 
Preventative and corrective maintenance shall be performed to maintain the function of the stormwater management measure, including repairs or replacement to the structure; removal of sediment, debris or trash; restoration of eroded areas; snow and ice removal; fence repair or replacement; restoration of vegetation; and repair or replacement of nonvegetated linings.
(f) 
The person responsible for maintenance identified under Subsection J(2)(b) above shall maintain a detailed log of all preventative and corrective maintenance for the structural stormwater management measures incorporated into the design of the development, including a record of all inspections and copies of all maintenance-related work orders.
(g) 
The person responsible for maintenance identified under Subsection J(2)(b) above shall evaluate the effectiveness of the maintenance plan at least once per year and adjust the plan and the deed as needed.
(h) 
The person responsible for maintenance identified under Subsection J(2)(b) above shall retain and make available, upon request by any public entity with administrative, health, environmental or safety authority over the site, the maintenance plan and the documentation required by Subsections J(2)(f) and (g) above.
(i) 
The requirements of Subsections J(2)(c) and (d) do not apply to stormwater management facilities that are dedicated to and accepted by the municipality or another governmental agency.
(j) 
In the event that the stormwater management facility becomes a danger to public safety or public health, or if it is in need of maintenance or repair, the municipality shall so notify the responsible person in writing. Upon receipt of that notice, the responsible person shall have 10 business days to effect maintenance and repair of the facility in a manner that is approved by the Municipal Engineer or his designee. The municipality, in its discretion, may extend the time allowed for effecting maintenance and repair for good cause. If the responsible person fails or refuses to perform such maintenance and repair, the municipality or county may immediately proceed to do so and shall bill the cost thereof to the responsible person. In the event no payment is received within 60 days of the date of the notice, a lien shall be placed on the property for the cost incurred by the Township.
(3) 
Nothing in this section shall preclude the municipality in which the major development is located from requiring the posting of a performance or maintenance guarantee in accordance with N.J.SA. 40:55D-53.
[1]
Editor's Note: Editor's Note: Ordinance No. 2005-89, adopted 10-4-2005, originally added §§ 130-76 through 130-76.3 dealing with storm sewer systems. This Ord. No. 2005-105 provided for the deletion of those sections from this chapter and their inclusion as a new Ch. 185, Stormwater System.

§ 130-76.1 Stormwater Control for Pinelands Area.

[Added 11-20-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-108]
A. 
Definitions. Unless specifically defined below, words or phrases used in this section shall be interpreted so as to give them the meaning they have in common usage and to give this section its most reasonable application. When used in this section, the following terms shall have the meanings herein ascribed to them:
AQUACULTURE
The propagation, rearing and subsequent harvesting of aquatic organisms in controlled or selected environments, and their subsequent processing, packaging and marketing, including but not limited to activities to intervene in the rearing process to increase production such as stocking, feeding, transplanting and providing for protection from predators.
CERTIFICATION
Either a written statement signed and sealed by a licensed New Jersey Professional Engineer attesting that a BMP design or stormwater management system conforms to or meets a particular set of standards or to action taken by the Commission pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:50-3, N.J.A.C. 7:50-3.11 to 7:50-3.20, or N.J.A.C. 7:50-3.61 to 7:50-3.70. Depending upon the context in which the term is used, the terms "certify" and "certified" shall be construed accordingly.
COMPACTION
The increase in soil bulk density caused by subjecting soil to greater-than-normal loading. Compaction can also decrease soil infiltration and permeability rates.
CONSTRUCTION
The construction, erection, reconstruction, alteration, conversion, demolition, removal or equipping of buildings, structures or components of a stormwater management system, including but not limited to collection inlets, stormwater piping, swales and all other conveyance systems, and stormwater BMPs.
COUNTY REVIEW AGENCY
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
DESIGN ENGINEER
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
DESIGN PERMEABILITY
The tested permeability rate with a factor of safety of two applied to it (e.g., if the tested permeability rate of the soil is four inches per hour, the design rate would be two inches per hour).
(1) 
The change or enlargement of any use or disturbance of any land, the performance of any building or mining operation, the division of land into two or more parcels, and the creation or termination of rights of access or riparian rights, including but not limited to:
(a) 
A change in type of use of a structure or land;
(b) 
A reconstruction, alteration of the size, or material change in the external appearance of a structure or land;
(c) 
A material increase in the intensity of use of land, such as an increase in the number of businesses, manufacturing establishments, offices or dwelling units in a structure or on land;
(d) 
Commencement of resource extraction or drilling or excavation on a parcel of land;
(e) 
Demolition of a structure or removal of trees;
(f) 
Commencement of forestry activities;
(g) 
Deposit of refuse, solid or liquid waste or fill on a parcel of land;
(h) 
In connection with the use of land, the making of any material change in noise levels, thermal conditions, or emissions of waste material; and
(i) 
Alteration, either physically or chemically, of a shore, bank, or floodplain, seacoast, river, stream, lake, pond, wetlands or artificial body of water.
(2) 
In the case of development on agricultural land, i.e., lands used for an agricultural use or purpose as defined at N.J.A.C. 7:50-2.11, "development means" any activity that requires a state permit; any activity reviewed by the County Agricultural Board (CAB) and the State Agricultural Development Committee (SADC), and municipal review of any activity not exempted by the Right to Farm Act, N.J.S.A. 4:1C-1 et seq.
DEVELOPMENT, MAJOR
Any division of land into five or more lots; any construction or expansion of any housing development of five or more dwelling units; any construction or expansion of any commercial or industrial use or structure on a site of more than three acres; or any development, grading, clearing or disturbance of an area in excess of 5,000 square feet. "Disturbance," for the purpose of this section, is the placement of impervious surface or exposure and/or movement of soil or bedrock or the clearing, cutting or removal of vegetation.
DEVELOPMENT, MINOR
All development other than major development.
DRAINAGE AREA
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
ENVIRONMENTALLY CRITICAL AREA
An area or feature which is of significant environmental value, including but not limited to stream corridors; natural heritage priority sites; habitat of endangered or threatened animal species; threatened or endangered plants of the Pinelands pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:5-6.27(a); large areas of contiguous open space or upland forest; steep slopes; and wellhead protection and groundwater recharge areas. "Threatened and endangered habitat" constitutes habitat that is critical for the survival of a local population of threatened and endangered species or habitat that is identified using the Department's Landscape Project as approved by the Department's Endangered and Nongame Species Program, whichever is more inclusive. Threatened and endangered wildlife shall be protected in conformance with N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.33.
EXCEPTION
The approval by the approving authority of a variance or other material departure from strict compliance with any section, part, phrase or provision of this section. An exception may be granted only under certain specific, narrowly defined conditions described herein and does not constitute a waiver of strict compliance with any section, part, phrase or provision of the Pinelands Comprehensive Management Plan (N.J.A.C. 7:50-1.1 et seq.).
EXTENDED DETENTION BASIN
A facility constructed through filling and/or excavation that provides temporary storage of stormwater runoff. It has an outlet structure that detains and attenuates runoff inflows and promotes the settlement of pollutants. An extended detention basin is normally designed as a multistage facility that provides runoff storage and attenuation for both stormwater quality and quantity management. The term "stormwater detention basin" shall have the same meaning as "extended detention basin."
FILTER MATERIAL
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
FINISHED GRADE
The elevation of the surface of the ground after completion of final grading, either via cutting, filling, or a combination thereof.
GRADING
Modification of a land slope by cutting and filling with the native soil, or redistribution of the native soil which is present at the site.
GROUNDWATER
Water below the land surface in a zone of saturation.
GROUNDWATER MOUNDING ANALYSIS
A test performed to demonstrate that the groundwater below a stormwater infiltration basin will not "mound up," encroach on the unsaturated zone, break the surface of the ground at the infiltration area, or downslope and create an overland flow situation.
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
Equipment, machinery, or vehicles that exert ground pressure in excess of eight pounds per square inch.
HIGH POLLUTANT LOADING AREA
An area in an industrial or commercial development site where solvents and/or petroleum products are loaded/unloaded, stored, or applied; where pesticides are loaded/unloaded or stored; where hazardous materials are expected to be present in greater than "reportable quantities" as defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at 40 CFR 302.4; where recharge would be inconsistent with NJDEP-approved remedial action work plan or landfill closure plan; and/or where a high risk exists for spills of toxic materials, such as gas stations and vehicle maintenance facilities. The term "HPLA" shall have the same meaning as "high pollutant loading area."
IMPERVIOUS SURFACE
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
INFILTRATION
The process by which precipitation enters the soil through its surface.
IN-LIEU CONTRIBUTION
A monetary fee collected by the Township of Stafford in lieu of requiring strict on-site compliance with the groundwater recharge, stormwater runoff quantity and/or stormwater runoff quality standards established in this section.
INSTALL
To assemble, construct, put in place, or connect components of a stormwater management system.
MITIGATION
Acts necessary to prevent, limit, remedy, or compensate for conditions that may result from those cases where an applicant has demonstrated the inability or impracticality of strict compliance with the stormwater management requirements set forth in N.J.A.C. 7:8, in an adopted regional stormwater management plan, or in a local ordinance which is as protective as N.J.A.C. 7:8 and an exception from strict compliance is granted by Stafford Township and the Pinelands Commission.
NEW JERSEY STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES MANUAL
Guidance developed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, in coordination with the New Jersey Department of Agriculture, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, the New Jersey Department of Transportation, municipal engineers, county engineers, consulting firms, contractors, and environmental organizations, to address the standards in the New Jersey Stormwater Management Rules, N.J.A.C. 7:8. The BMP Manual provides examples of ways to meet the standards contained in the rule. An applicant may demonstrate that other proposed management practices will also achieve the standards established in the rules. The manual, and notices regarding future versions of the manual, are available from the Division of Watershed Management, NJDEP, P.O. Box 418, Trenton, New Jersey 08625; and on the NJDEP's website, www.njstormwater.org. The term "New Jersey BMP Manual" shall have the same meaning as "New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual."
NJDEP
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
NJPDES
The New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System as set forth in N.J.S.A. 58:10A-1 et seq. and in N.J.A.C. 7:14A.
NJPDES PERMIT
A permit issued by the NJDEP pursuant to the authority of the Water Pollution Control Act, N.J.S.A. 58:10A-1 et seq., and N.J.A.C. 7:14A for a discharge of pollutants.
(1) 
Any human-made or human-induced activity, factor, or condition, other than a point source, from which pollutants are or may be discharged;
(2) 
Any human-made or human-induced activity, factor, or condition, other than a point source, that may temporarily or permanently change any chemical, physical, biological, or radiological characteristic of waters of the state from what was, or is, the natural, pristine condition of such waters or that may increase the degree of such change; or
(3) 
Any activity, factor or condition, other than a point source, that contributes, or may contribute, to water pollution.
NONSTRUCTURAL BMP
A stormwater management measure, strategy or combination of strategies that reduces adverse stormwater runoff impact through sound site planning and design. Nonstructural BMPs include such practices as minimizing site disturbance, preserving important site features, reducing and disconnecting impervious cover, flattening slopes, utilizing native vegetation, minimizing turf grass lawns, maintaining natural drainage features and characteristics and controlling stormwater runoff and pollutants closer to the source. The term "low-impact development technique" shall have the same meaning as "nonstructural BMP."
NUTRIENT
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
PERMEABILITY
The rate at which water moves through a saturated unit area of soil or rock material at hydraulic gradient of one, determined as prescribed in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.2 (tube permeameter test), N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.5 (pit-bailing test) or N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.6 (piezometer test). Alternative permeability test procedures may be accepted by the approving authority, provided the test procedure attains saturation of surrounding soils, accounts for hydraulic head effects on infiltration rates, provides a permeability rate with units expressed in inches per hour and is accompanied by a published source reference. Examples of suitable sources include hydrogeology, geotechnical, or engineering text and design manuals, proceedings of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) symposia, or peer-review journals. Neither a soil permeability class rating test, as described in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.3, nor a percolation test, as described in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.4, are acceptable tests for establishing permeability values for the purpose of complying with this section.
PERMEABLE
Having a permeability of one inch per hour or faster. The terms "permeable soil," "permeable rock" and "permeable fill" shall be construed accordingly.
PERSON
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
PINELANDS CMP
The New Jersey Pinelands Comprehensive Management Plan (N.J.A.C. 7:50-1.1 et seq.).
PINELANDS COMMISSION or COMMISSION
The Commission created pursuant to Section 5 of the Pinelands Protection Act, N.J.S.A. 13:18A-5.
POINT SOURCE
Any discernible, confined, and discrete conveyance, including, but not limited to, any pipe, ditch, channel, tunnel, conduit, well, discrete fissure, container, rolling stock, concentrated animal feeding operation, landfill leachate collection system, vessel, or other floating craft, from which pollutants are or may be discharged. This term does not include return flows from irrigated agriculture.
POLLUTANT
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER
A person licensed to practice professional engineering in the State of New Jersey pursuant to N.J.S.A. 45:8-27 et seq.
RECHARGE
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
REPLICATE
One of two or more soil samples or tests taken at the same location (within five feet of each other) and depth, within the same soil horizon or substratum. In the case of fill material, "replicate tests" are tests performed on subsamples of the same bulk sample packed to the same bulk density.
SAND
A particle size category consisting of mineral particles which are between 0.05 and 2.0 millimeters in equivalent spherical diameter. Also, a soil textural class having 85% or more of sand and a content of silt and clay such that the percentage of silt plus 1.5 times the percentage of clay does not exceed 15, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
SEASONALLY HIGH WATER TABLE
The upper limit of the shallowest zone of saturation which occurs in the soil, identified as prescribed in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-5.8.
SEDIMENT
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
SITE
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
SOIL
All unconsolidated mineral and organic material of any origin which is not a rock substratum, including sediments below the biologically active and/or weathered zones.
SOURCE MATERIAL
Any material(s) or machinery, located at an industrial facility that is directly or indirectly related to process, manufacturing or other industrial activities, which could be a source of pollutants in any industrial stormwater discharge to groundwater. Source materials include, but are not limited to, raw materials, intermediate products, final products, waste materials, by-products, industrial machinery, and fuels and lubricants, solvents, and detergents that are related to process, manufacturing, or other industrial activities that are exposed to stormwater.
STORMWATER
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
STORMWATER INFILTRATION BMP
A basin or other facility constructed within permeable soils that provides temporary storage of stormwater runoff. An infiltration BMP does not normally have a structural outlet to discharge runoff from the stormwater quality design storm. Instead, outflow from an infiltration BMP is through the surrounding soil. The terms "infiltration measure" and "infiltration practice" shall have the same meaning as "stormwater infiltration basin."
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURE
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
STORMWATER RUNOFF
Water flow on the surface of the ground, or in storm sewers, resulting from precipitation.
SUBSURFACE INFILTRATION SYSTEMS
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
SUITABLE SOIL
Unsaturated soil, above the seasonally high water table, which contains less than 50% by volume of coarse fragments and which has a tested permeability rate of between one inch and 20 inches per hour.
SURFACE WATER
Any waters of the state which are not groundwater.
TIDAL FLOOD HAZARD AREA
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
TIME OF CONCENTRATION
The time it takes for runoff to travel from the hydraulically most distant point of the drainage area to the point of interest within a watershed.
TOTAL SUSPENDED SOLIDS
The insoluble solid matter suspended in water and stormwater that is separable by laboratory filtration in accordance with the procedures contained in the "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater" prepared and published jointly by the American Public Health Association, the American Water Works Association and the Water Pollution Control Federation. The term "TSS" shall have the same meaning as "total suspended solids."
WATERS OF THE STATE
Shall have the meaning as described in § 130-76, "Stormwater control."
WATER TABLE
The upper surface of a zone of saturation.
WELL
A bored, drilled, or driven shaft, or a dug hole, which extends below the seasonally high water table and which has a depth which is greater than its largest surface dimension.
WETLANDS
Those lands which are inundated or saturated by water at a magnitude, duration and frequency sufficient to support the growth of hydrophytes. Wetlands include lands with poorly drained or very poorly drained soils as designated by the National Cooperative Soils Survey of the Soil Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. Wetlands include coastal wetlands and inland wetlands, including submerged lands. The "New Jersey Pinelands Commission Manual for Identifying and Delineating Pinelands Area Wetlands: A Pinelands Supplement to the Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands," dated January 1991, as amended, may be utilized in delineating the extent of wetlands based on the definitions of "wetlands" and "wetlands soils" contained in this section, N.J.A.C. 7:50-2.11, 7:50-6.4 and 7:50-6.5. The term "wetland" shall have the same meaning as "wetlands."
WET POND
A stormwater facility constructed through filling and/or excavation that provides both permanent and temporary storage of stormwater runoff. It has an outlet structure that creates a permanent pool and detains and attenuates runoff inflows and promotes the settling of pollutants. A stormwater retention basin can also be designed as a multistage facility that also provides extended detention for enhanced stormwater quality design storm treatment and runoff storage and attenuation for stormwater quantity management. The term "stormwater retention basin" shall have the same meaning as "wet pond."
B. 
Scope and purpose.
(1) 
Purpose.
(a) 
It is hereby determined that:
[1] 
Land development projects and associated disturbance of vegetation and soil and changes in land cover, including increases in impervious cover, alter the hydrologic response of local watersheds and increase stormwater runoff rates and volumes. If inadequately or improperly managed, this stormwater runoff can deplete groundwater resources and increase flooding, stream channel erosion, and sediment transport and deposition.
[2] 
This stormwater runoff contributes to increased quantities of waterborne pollutants.
[3] 
Increases of stormwater runoff, soil erosion and nonpoint source pollutants have occurred in the past as a result of land development and contribute to the degradation of the water resources of Stafford Township.
[4] 
Certain lands of the Township of Stafford lie within the Pinelands Area, and therefore, development in this portion of Stafford Township is subject to the requirements of the Pinelands Protection Act (N.J.S.A. 13:18A-1 et seq.) and the implementing regulations and minimum standards contained in the Pinelands Comprehensive Management Plan (CMP) (N.J.A.C. 7:50-1.1 et seq.). The purpose and intent of these regulations and standards is to promote orderly development of the Pinelands so as to preserve and protect the significant and unique natural, ecological, agricultural, archaeological, historical, scenic, cultural and recreational resources of the Pinelands.
[5] 
Pinelands Area resources are to be protected in accordance with Pinelands Comprehensive Management Plan at N.J.A.C. 7:50 et seq., New Jersey's Stormwater Management Rules at N.J.A.C. 7:8-1.1 et seq. and New Jersey's surface water quality antidegradation policies contained in the New Jersey Surface Water Quality Standards at N.J.A.C. 7:9B-1.1 et seq. Permitted uses shall maintain the ecological character and quality of the Pinelands, including good water quality and natural rates and volumes of flow.
[6] 
Increased stormwater rates and volumes and the sediments and pollutants associated with stormwater runoff from future development projects within the Pinelands Area have the potential to adversely affect Stafford Township's streams and water resources and the streams and water resources of downstream municipalities.
[7] 
Stormwater runoff, soil erosion and nonpoint source pollution can be controlled and minimized through the regulation of stormwater runoff from development sites.
[8] 
It is in the public interest to regulate the discharge of stormwater runoff from "major development" projects, as defined in Subsection A of this section, conducted within the Pinelands Area, as provided in this section, in order to control and minimize increases in stormwater runoff rates and volumes, to maintain groundwater recharge, and to control and minimize soil erosion, stream channel erosion and nonpoint source pollution associated with stormwater runoff.
(b) 
Therefore, it is the purpose of this section to establish minimum stormwater management requirements and controls for major development, consistent with the statewide stormwater requirements at N.J.A.C. 7:8, the regulations and standards contained in the Pinelands CMP, and the provisions of the adopted Master Plan and land use ordinances of Stafford Township.
(2) 
Goals and techniques.
(a) 
Through this section, Stafford Township has established the following goals for stormwater control:
[1] 
To reduce flood damage, including damage to life and property;
[2] 
To minimize any increase in stormwater runoff from new development;
[3] 
To reduce soil erosion from any development or construction project;
[4] 
To assure the adequacy of existing and proposed culverts and bridges and other in-stream structures;
[5] 
To maintain groundwater recharge;
[6] 
To minimize any increase in nonpoint pollution;
[7] 
To maintain the integrity of stream channels for their biological functions, as well as for drainage;
[8] 
To restore, protect, maintain and enhance the quality of the streams and water resources of Stafford Township and the ecological character and quality of the Pinelands Area;
[9] 
To minimize pollutants in stormwater runoff from new and existing development in order to restore, protect, enhance and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the surface waters and groundwaters of Stafford Township, to protect public health and to enhance the domestic, municipal, recreational, industrial and other uses of water; and
[10] 
To protect public safety through the proper design and operation of stormwater management basins.
(b) 
In order to achieve the goals for stormwater control set forth in this section, the Township of Stafford has identified the following management techniques:
[1] 
Implementation of multiple stormwater management best management practices (BMPs) may be necessary to achieve the performance standards for stormwater runoff quantity and rate, groundwater recharge, erosion control, and stormwater runoff quality established through this section.
[2] 
Compliance with the stormwater runoff quantity and rate, groundwater recharge, erosion control, and stormwater runoff quality standards established through N.J.A.C. 7:8-1.1 et seq., and this section, shall be accomplished to the maximum extent practicable through the use of nonstructural BMPs, before relying on structural BMPs. Nonstructural BMPs are also known as low-impact development (LID) techniques.
[3] 
Nonstructural BMPs shall include both environmentally sensitive site design and source controls that prevent pollutants from being placed on the site or from being exposed to stormwater.
[4] 
Source control plans shall be developed based upon physical site conditions and the origin, nature and anticipated quantity or amount of potential pollutants.
[5] 
Structural BMPs, where necessary, shall be integrated with nonstructural stormwater management strategies and proper maintenance plans.
[6] 
When using structural BMPs, multiple stormwater management measures, smaller in size and distributed spatially throughout the land development site, shall be used wherever possible to achieve the performance standards for water quality, quantity and groundwater recharge established through this section before relying on a single, larger stormwater management measure to achieve these performance standards.
(3) 
Applicability. This section shall apply to:
(a) 
All site plans, subdivisions and road improvement plans for major developments occurring within the Pinelands Area that require preliminary or final site plan, subdivision, or road improvement plan review; and
(b) 
All major development projects undertaken by Stafford Township within the Pinelands Area shall comply with this section.
(4) 
Procedures. In addition to other development review procedures set forth in the Code of the Township of Stafford, major developments located within the Pinelands Area shall comply with the stormwater management requirements and specifications set forth in this section. New agricultural development that meets the definition of "major development" in Subsection A of this section shall be submitted to the appropriate Soil Conservation District for review and approval in accordance with the requirements of N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.4(b).
(5) 
Compatibility with other permit and ordinance requirements.
(a) 
Development approvals issued for subdivisions and site plans pursuant to this section are to be considered an integral part of development approvals under the subdivision and site plan review process and do not relieve the applicant of the responsibility to secure required permits or approvals for activities regulated by any other applicable ordinance, code, rule, regulation, statute, act or other provision of law.
(b) 
In their interpretation and application, the provisions of this section shall be held to be the minimum requirements for the promotion of the public health, safety, and general welfare. This section is not intended to interfere with, abrogate, or annul any other ordinance, rule or regulation, statute, or other provision of law except that, where any provision of this section imposes restrictions different from those imposed by any other ordinance, rule or regulation, or other provision of law, the more restrictive or stringent provisions or higher standards shall control.
(c) 
In the event that a regional stormwater management plan(s) is prepared and formally adopted pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:8-1.1 et seq. for any drainage area(s) or watershed(s) of which Stafford Township is a part, the stormwater provisions of such a plan(s) shall be adopted by Stafford Township within one year of the adoption of a regional stormwater management plan (RSWMP) as an amendment to an areawide water quality management plan. Local ordinances proposed to implement the RSWMP shall be submitted to the Commission for certification within six months of the adoption of the RSWMP per N.J.A.C. 7:8 and the Pinelands CMP (N.J.A.C. 7:50.)
C. 
Requirements for a site development stormwater plan.
(1) 
Submission of site development stormwater plan.
(a) 
Whenever an applicant seeks municipal approval of a site development that is subject to this section, the applicant shall submit all of the required components of the checklist for the site development stormwater plan at Subsection C(3) below as part of the applicant's application for subdivision or site plan approval. In addition, the applicant shall refer to the Township of Stafford Code Chapter 130, "Land Use and Development" checklists for additional submission requirements for subdivision or site plan approval. These required components are in addition to any other information required under any provisions of the Pinelands Commission pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:50-1.1 et seq.
(b) 
The applicant shall demonstrate that the site development project meets the standards set forth in this section.
(c) 
The applicant shall submit 12 copies of the materials listed in the checklist for site development stormwater plans in accordance with Subsection C(3) of this section.
(2) 
Site development stormwater plan approval. The applicant's site development stormwater plan shall be reviewed as a part of the subdivision or site plan review process by the municipal board or official from which municipal approval is sought. That municipal board or official shall consult the engineer retained by the Planning Board and/or Zoning Board (as appropriate) to determine if all of the checklist requirements have been satisfied and to determine if the project meets the standards set forth in this section.
(3) 
Checklist requirements. The following information shall be required:
(a) 
Topographic base map. The applicant shall submit a topographic base map of the site which extends a minimum of 300 feet beyond the limits of the proposed development, at a scale of one inch equals 200 feet or greater, showing one-foot contour intervals. The map shall indicate the following: existing surface water drainage, shorelines, steep slopes, soils, highly erodible soils, perennial or intermittent streams that drain into or upstream of any Category One or Pinelands waters, wetlands and floodplains, along with their appropriate buffer strips, marshlands and other wetlands, pervious or vegetative surfaces, existing surface and subsurface human-made structures, roads, bearing and distances of property lines, and significant natural and man-made features not otherwise shown. Stafford Township or the Pinelands Commission may require upstream tributary drainage system information as necessary.
(b) 
Environmental site analysis.
[1] 
The applicant shall submit a written description along with the drawings of the natural and human-made features of the site and its environs. This description should include:
[a] 
A discussion of environmentally critical areas, soil conditions, slopes, wetlands, waterways and vegetation on the site. Particular attention should be given to unique, unusual or environmentally sensitive features and to those that provide particular opportunities for or constraints on development; and
[b] 
Detailed soil and other environmental conditions on the portion of the site proposed for installation of any stormwater BMPs, including, at a minimum: soils report based on on-site soil tests; locations and spot elevations in plan view of test pits and permeability tests; permeability test data and calculations; and any other required soil data (e.g., mounding analyses results) correlated with location and elevation of each test site; cross-section of proposed stormwater BMP with side-by-side depiction of soil profile drawn to scale and seasonal high water table elevation identified; and any other information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the specific proposed structural and nonstructural stormwater management measures relative to the environmental conditions on the portion(s) of the site proposed for implementation of those measures.
[2] 
Refer to Chapter 130, § 130-94, of the Township of Stafford Code for other requirements of the environmental impact assessment.
(c) 
Project description and site plan(s). The applicant shall submit a map, or maps, at the scale of the topographic base map, indicating the location of existing and proposed buildings, roads, parking areas, utilities, structural facilities for stormwater management and sediment control, and other permanent structures. The map(s) shall also clearly show areas where alterations will occur in the natural terrain and cover, including lawns and other landscaping, and seasonal high groundwater elevations. A written description of the site plan and justification for proposed changes in natural conditions shall also be provided. Additional requirements are listed in Chapter 130 of the Township of Stafford Code.
(d) 
Land use planning and source control plan.
[1] 
The applicant shall submit a detailed land use planning and source control plan which provides a description of how the site will be developed to meet the erosion control, groundwater recharge and stormwater runoff quantity and quality standards at Subsection E through use of nonstructural or low-impact development techniques and source controls to the maximum extent practicable before relying on structural BMPs. The land use planning and source control plan shall include a detailed narrative and associated illustrative maps and/or plans that specifically address how each of the following nine nonstructural strategies identified in Subchapter 5 of the NJDEP Stormwater Management Rules (N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.1 et seq.) and set forth below Subsection C(3)(d)[1][a] through [i] will be implemented to the maximum extent practicable to meet the standards at Subsection E of this section on the site. If one or more of the nine nonstructural strategies will not be implemented on the site, the applicant shall provide a detailed rationale establishing a basis for the contention that use of the strategy is not practicable on the site.
[a] 
Protect areas that provide water quality benefits or areas particularly susceptible to erosion and sediment loss;
[b] 
Minimize impervious surfaces and break up or disconnect the flow of runoff over impervious surfaces;
[c] 
Maximize the protection of natural drainage features and vegetation;
[d] 
Minimize the decrease in the predevelopment "time of concentration";
[e] 
Minimize land disturbance, including clearing and grading;
[f] 
Minimize soil compaction and all other soil disturbance;
[g] 
Provide low-maintenance landscaping that provides for the retention and planting of native plants and minimizes the use of lawns, fertilizers and pesticides, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.24;
[h] 
Provide vegetated open-channel conveyance systems discharging into and through stable vegetated areas; and
[i] 
Provide other source controls to prevent or minimize the use or exposure of pollutants at the site in order to prevent or minimize the release of those pollutants into stormwater runoff. These source controls shall include, but not be limited to:
[i] 
Site design features that help to prevent accumulation of trash and debris in drainage systems;
[ii] 
Site design features that help to prevent discharge of trash and debris from drainage systems;
[iii] 
Site design features that help to prevent and/or contain spills or other harmful accumulations of pollutants at industrial or commercial developments; and
[iv] 
Applying fertilizer in accordance with the requirements established under the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, N.J.S.A. 4:24-39 et seq., and implementing rules when establishing vegetation after land disturbance.
[2] 
For sites where stormwater will be generated from high pollutant loading areas or where stormwater will be exposed to source material as defined in Subsection A of this section, the applicant shall also demonstrate in the land use planning and source control plan that the requirements of Subsection E have been met.
[3] 
The use of nonstructural strategies to meet the performance standards in Subsection E of this section is not required for development sites creating less than one acre of disturbance. However, each application for major development and any other application where Stafford Township otherwise requires a landscaping plan shall contain a landscaping or revegetation plan in accordance with the CMP standards located at N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.24(c). In addition, the applicant shall demonstrate that, at a minimum, existing trees and vegetation on the development site will be preserved and protected according to the minimum standards established by provisions of the Stafford Township Land Use Ordinance or Zoning Ordinance[1] or by conditions of zoning or variance approval.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 211, Zoning.
(e) 
Stormwater Management Facilities Map. The applicant shall submit a map at the same scale as the topographic base map depicting the following information:
[1] 
The total area to be disturbed, paved and/or built upon, proposed surface contours, land area to be occupied by the stormwater management facilities and the type of vegetation thereon, and details of the proposed plan to manage and dispose of stormwater; and
[2] 
Details of all stormwater management facility designs during and after construction, including discharge provisions, discharge capacity for each outlet at different levels of detention (if applicable), and emergency spillway provisions with maximum discharge capacity of each spillway.
(f) 
Calculations (groundwater recharge and stormwater runoff rate, volume and quality). The applicant shall submit comprehensive hydrologic and hydraulic design calculations for the predevelopment and postdevelopment conditions for the design storms specified in Subsection D. The standards for groundwater recharge and stormwater runoff rate, volume and quality required by Subsection E shall be met using the methods, calculations and assumptions provided in Subsection D.
(g) 
Inspection, maintenance and repair plan. The applicant shall submit a detailed plan describing how the proposed stormwater management measure(s) shall meet the maintenance and repair requirements of Subsection G of this section. Said plan shall include, at a minimum, the following elements:
[1] 
The frequency with which inspections will be made;
[2] 
The specific maintenance tasks and requirements for each proposed structural and nonstructural BMP;
[3] 
The name, address and telephone number for the entity responsible for implementation of the maintenance plan;
[4] 
The reporting requirements; and
[5] 
Copies of the inspection and maintenance reporting sheets.
(h) 
Exception from submission requirements. An exception may be granted from submission of any of these required components [except Subsection C(3)(g) above, Inspection, maintenance, and repair plan] if its absence will not materially affect the review process. However, items required pursuant to the application requirements in the Pinelands CMP [N.J.A.C. 7:50-4.2(b)] shall be submitted to the N.J. Pinelands Commission unless the Executive Director waives or modifies the application requirements.
D. 
Methodologies for calculation of stormwater runoff rate and volume, stormwater runoff quality, and groundwater recharge.
(1) 
Method of calculating stormwater runoff rate and volume.
(a) 
In complying with the stormwater runoff quantity and rate standards in Subsection E(2), the design engineer shall calculate the stormwater runoff rate and volume using the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) runoff equation, runoff curve numbers, and dimensionless unit hydrograph, as described in the NRCS National Engineering Handbook Part 630 - Hydrology and Technical Release 55 - Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds, incorporated herein by reference, as amended and supplemented. Alternative methods of calculation may be utilized, provided such alternative methods are at least as protective as the NRCS methodology when considered on a regional stormwater management basis.
(b) 
In calculating stormwater runoff using the NRCS methodology, the design engineer shall separately calculate and then combine the runoff volumes from pervious and directly connected impervious surfaces within each drainage area within the parcel.
(c) 
Calculation of stormwater runoff from unconnected impervious surfaces shall be based, as applicable, upon the two-step method described in the current New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual or the NRCS methodology.
(d) 
In calculating stormwater runoff using the NRCS methodology, the design engineer shall use appropriate twenty-four-hour rainfall depths as developed for the project site by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, available online at http://hdsc.nws.noaa.gov/hdsc/pfds/index.html.
(e) 
When calculating stormwater runoff for predeveloped site conditions, the design engineer shall use the following criteria:
[1] 
When selecting or calculating runoff curve numbers (CNs) for predeveloped project site conditions, the project site's land cover shall be assumed to be woods in good condition. However, another land cover may be used to calculate runoff coefficients if:
[a] 
Such land cover has existed at the site or portion thereof without interruption for at least five years immediately prior to the time of application; and
[b] 
The design engineer can document the character and extent of such land cover through the use of photographs, affidavits, and/or other acceptable land use records.
[2] 
If more than one land cover has existed on the site during the five years immediately prior to the time of application, the land cover with the lowest runoff potential shall be used for the computations.
[3] 
All predeveloped land covers shall be assumed to be in good hydrologic condition and, if cultivated, shall be assumed to have conservation treatment.
[4] 
In calculating predeveloped site stormwater runoff, the design engineer shall include the effects of all land features and structures, such as ponds, wetlands, depressions, hedgerows, and culverts, that affect predeveloped site stormwater runoff rates and/or volumes.
[5] 
Where tailwater will affect the hydraulic performance of a stormwater management measure, the design engineer shall include such effects in the measure's design.
(2) 
Method of calculating stormwater runoff quality.
(a) 
In complying with the stormwater runoff quality standards in Subsection E(6), the design engineer shall calculate the stormwater runoff rate and volume using the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) runoff equation, runoff curve numbers, and dimensionless unit hydrograph, as described in the NRCS National Engineering Handbook Part 630 - Hydrology and Technical Release 55 - Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds, as amended and supplemented.
(b) 
The design engineer shall also use the NJDEP water quality design storm, which is 1.25 inches of rainfall falling in a nonlinear pattern in two hours. Details of the water quality design storm are shown in Table 1.
(c) 
Calculation of runoff volumes, peak rates, and hydrographs for the Water Quality Design Storm may take into account the implementation of nonstructural and structural stormwater management measures.
Table 1
Water Quality Design Storm Distribution1
Time
(minutes)
Cumulative Rainfall
(inches)1
Time
(minutes)
Cumulative Rainfall
(inches)
0
0.0000
65
0.8917
5
0.0083
70
0.9917
10
0.0166
75
1.0500
15
0.0250
80
1.0840
20
0.0500
85
1.1170
25
0.0750
90
1.1500
30
0.1000
95
1.1750
35
0.1330
100
1.2000
40
0.1660
105
1.2250
45
0.2000
110
1.2334
50
0.2583
115
1.2417
55
0.3583
120
1.2500
60
0.6250
NOTES:
1 Source: N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.5(a).
(d) 
Total suspended solids (TSS) reduction calculations.
[1] 
If more than one stormwater BMP in series is necessary to achieve the required eighty-percent TSS reduction for a site, the applicant shall utilize the following formula to calculate TSS reduction:
R = A + B - (A x B)/100
Where
R
=
Total TSS percent load removal from application of both BMPs;
A
=
The TSS percent removal rate applicable to the first BMP; and
B
=
The TSS percent removal rate applicable to the second BMP.
[2] 
If there is more than one on-site drainage area, the eighty-percent TSS removal rate shall apply to each drainage area, unless the runoff from the subareas converge on site, in which case the removal rate can be demonstrated through a calculation using a weighted average.
(e) 
TSS removal rates for stormwater BMPs.
[1] 
For purposes of TSS reduction calculations, Table 2 presents the presumed removal rates for certain BMPs designed in accordance with the New Jersey BMP Manual. The BMP Manual may be obtained from the address identified in Subsection I(1) or found on the NJDEP's website at www.njstormwater.org. TSS reduction shall be calculated based on the removal rates for the BMPs in Table 2.
[2] 
Alternative stormwater management measures, removal rates and methods of calculating removal rates may be used if the design engineer provides documentation demonstrating the capability of these alternative rates and methods to the Township of Stafford. Any alternative stormwater management measure, removal rate or method of calculating the removal rate shall be subject to approval by the Township of Stafford, and a copy shall be provided to the following:
[a] 
The Division of Watershed Management, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, P.O. Box 418, Trenton, N.J. 08625-0418; and
[b] 
The New Jersey Pinelands Commission, P.O. Box 7, New Lisbon, N.J. 08064.
Table 2
Pollutant Removal Rates for BMPs1
Best Management Practice
TSS Percent Removal Rate
Total Phosphorus Percent Removal Rate
Total Nitrogen Percent Removal Rate
Bioretention Systems
90%
60%
30%
Constructed stormwater wetland
90%
50%
30%
Extended detention basin
40% to 60% (final rate based upon detention time; see New Jersey BMP Manual, Chapter 9)
20%
20%
Infiltration basin
80%
60%
50%
Manufactured treatment device
Pollutant removal rates as certified by NJDEP; see Subsection D
Pollutant removal rates as certified by NJDEP; see Subsection D
Pollutant removal rates as certified by NJDEP; see Subsection D
Pervious paving systems
80% (porous paving)
60%
50%
80% (permeable pavers with storage bed)
0%; volume reduction only (permeable pavers without storage bed)
0%; volume reduction only (permeable pavers without storage bed)
0%; volume reduction only (permeable pavers without storage bed)
Sand filter
80%
50%
35%
Vegetative filter strip (For filter strips with multiple vegetated covers, the final TSS removal rate should be based upon a weighted average of the adopted rates shown in Table 2, based upon the relative flow lengths through each cover type.)
60% (turf grass)
70% (native grasses, meadow and planted woods)
30%
30%
80% (indigenous woods)
Wet pond/retention basin
50% to 90% (final rate based upon pool volume and detention time; see New Jersey BMP Manual)
50%
30%
Subsurface infiltration systems
80% (as approved by the NJDEP for Stafford Township)
60%
50%
NOTES:
1 Source: N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.5(c) and New Jersey BMP Manual, Chapter 4.
(f) 
Nutrient removal rates for stormwater BMPs. For purposes of postdevelopment nutrient load reduction calculations, Table 2 presents the presumed removal rates for certain BMPs designed in accordance with the New Jersey BMP Manual. If alternative stormwater BMPs are proposed, the applicant shall demonstrate that the selected BMPs will achieve the nutrient removal standard required in Subsection E(6).
(3) 
Methods of calculating groundwater recharge.
(a) 
In complying with the groundwater recharge requirements in Subsection E(3)(a)[1], the design engineer may calculate groundwater recharge in accordance with the New Jersey Groundwater Recharge Spreadsheet (NJGRS) computer program incorporated herein by reference as amended and supplemented. Information regarding the methodology is available in Subsection H(1) or from the New Jersey BMP Manual.
(b) 
Alternative groundwater recharge calculation methods to meet these requirements may be used upon approval by the Municipal Engineer.
(c) 
In complying with the groundwater recharge requirements in Subsection E(3)(a)[2], the design engineer shall:
[1] 
Calculate stormwater runoff volumes in accordance with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) methodology, including the NRCS runoff equation and runoff curve numbers, as described in the NRCS National Engineering Handbook Part 630 - Hydrology and Technical Release 55 - Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds, as amended and supplemented; and
[2] 
Use appropriate two-year, twenty-four-hour rainfall depths as developed for the project site by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, available online at http://hdsc.nws.noaa.gov/hdsc/pfds/index.html.
(d) 
When calculating groundwater recharge or stormwater runoff for predeveloped site conditions, the design engineer shall use the following criteria:
[1] 
When selecting land covers or calculating runoff curve numbers (CNs) for predeveloped project site conditions, the project site's land cover shall be assumed to be woods. However, another land cover may be used to calculate runoff coefficients if:
[a] 
Such land cover has existed at the site or portion thereof without interruption for at least five years immediately prior to the time of application; and
[b] 
The design engineer can document the character and extent of such land cover through the use of photographs, affidavits, and/or other acceptable land use records.
[2] 
If more than one land cover, other than woods, has existed on the site during the five years immediately prior to the time of application, the land cover with the lowest runoff potential (including woods) shall be used for the computations.
[3] 
All predeveloped land covers shall be assumed to be in good hydrologic condition and, if cultivated, shall be assumed to have conservation treatment.
E. 
Stormwater management performance standards for major development.
(1) 
Nonstructural stormwater management strategies.
(a) 
To the maximum extent practicable, the performance standards in Subsection E for major development shall be met by incorporating the nine nonstructural strategies identified in Subchapter 5 of the N.J. Stormwater Management Rules (N.J.A.C. 7:8-5), and set forth in Subsection C(3)(d)[1], into the design. The applicant shall identify within the land use planning and source control plan required by Subsection C(3)(d) of this section how each of the nine nonstructural measures will be incorporated into the design of the project to the maximum extent practicable.
(b) 
If the applicant contends that it is not practical for engineering, environmental, or safety reasons to incorporate any of the nine nonstructural strategies into the design of a particular project, the applicant shall provide a detailed rationale establishing a basis for the contention that use of the strategy is not practical on the site. This rationale shall be submitted, in accordance with the checklist requirements established by Subsection C, to Stafford Township. A determination by Stafford Township that this rationale is inadequate or without merit shall result in a denial of the application unless one of the following conditions is met:
[1] 
The land use planning and source control plan is amended to include a description of how all nine nonstructural measures will be implemented on the development site, and the amended plan is approved by Stafford Township;
[2] 
The land use planning and source control plan is amended to provide an alternative nonstructural strategy or measure that is not included in the list of nine nonstructural measures, but still meets the performance standards in Subsection E, and the amended plan is approved by Stafford Township; or
[3] 
The land use planning and source control plan is amended to provide an adequate rationale for the contention that use of the particular strategy is not practical on the site, and the amended Plan is approved by Stafford Township.
(c) 
In addition to all other requirements of this section, each applicant shall demonstrate that, at a minimum, existing trees and vegetation on the development site will be preserved, protected and maintained according to the minimum standards established by provisions of the Township of Stafford Land Use Ordinance, Zoning Ordinance[2] or conditions of zoning or variance approval. Existing trees and vegetation shall be protected during construction activities in accordance with the "Standard for Tree Protection During Construction" provided in the N.J. State Soil Conservation Committee Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey, which is incorporated herein by reference, as amended and supplemented.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 211, Zoning.
(d) 
In addition to all other requirements of this section, each application for major development and any other application where Stafford Township otherwise requires a landscaping plan shall contain a landscaping or revegetation plan in accordance with the Pinelands CMP standards at N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.24(c).
(e) 
Any land area used as a nonstructural stormwater management measure to meet the performance standards in Subsection E shall be dedicated to a government entity; shall be subjected to a conservation easement filed with the appropriate County Clerk's office; or shall be subjected to an equivalent form of restriction approved by the Township of Stafford that ensures that that measure, or equivalent stormwater management measure, is maintained in perpetuity, as detailed in Subsection G of this section.
(f) 
Guidance for nonstructural stormwater management strategies is available in the New Jersey BMP Manual, which may be obtained from the address identified in Subsection I(1) or found on the NJDEP's website at www.njstormwater.org.
(g) 
Exception for major development sites creating less than one acre of disturbance. The use of nonstructural strategies to meet the performance standards in Subsection E of this section is not required for major development creating less than one acre of disturbance. However, the following requirements shall be met:
[1] 
Each application for major development and any other application where Stafford Township otherwise requires a landscaping plan shall contain a landscaping or revegetation plan prepared in accordance with the Pinelands CMP standards [N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.24(c)];
[2] 
Each applicant shall demonstrate that, at a minimum, existing trees and vegetation on the development site will be preserved and protected according to the minimum standards established by provisions of Stafford Township Land Use Ordinance, Zoning Ordinance,[3] or conditions of zoning or variance approval; and
[3]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 211, Zoning.
[3] 
Existing trees and vegetation shall be protected during construction activities in accordance with the "Standard for Tree Protection During Construction" provided in the N.J. State Soil Conservation Committee Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey, which is incorporated herein by reference as amended and supplemented.
(2) 
Stormwater runoff quantity and rate standards.
(a) 
There shall be no direct discharge of stormwater runoff from any point or nonpoint source to any wetland, wetlands transition area or surface water body. In addition, stormwater runoff shall not be directed in such a way as to increase the volume and/or rate of discharge into any surface water body from that which existed prior to development of the site.
(b) 
To the maximum extent practical, there shall be no direct discharge of stormwater runoff onto farm fields so as to protect farm crops from damage due to flooding, erosion and long-term saturation of cultivated crops and cropland.
(c) 
For all major developments, subsurface infiltration systems shall be provided; the greater of the total runoff volume generated from the net increase of the postdevelopment and the predevelopment one-hundred-year, twenty-four-hour storm or the total runoff volume generated from the net increase in impervious surfaces by a ten-year, twenty-four-hour storm shall be retained and infiltrated on site.
[1] 
Where high water table, soil permeability or configuration of the site make infiltration impractical, the Township may approve a combination system or waive this requirement.
[2] 
Where the soil infiltration rate is less than 0.50 inch per hour, other methods of stormwater runoff control shall be used.
[3] 
Where a combination system is permitted, it shall be designed in accordance with the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual. In designing the combination stormwater management system for a particular project, the existing physical site conditions shall be carefully considered. Slopes, depth to seasonal high water table relative to proposed grades, soil type, texture and permeability of the watershed area and the site are all critical to the selection of a suitable combination of stormwater management techniques.
[4] 
Where a combination system is used, it shall be designed to provide nonpoint source pollutant removal efficiencies equivalent to the underground system when evaluated in accordance with the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual.
[5] 
Where detention is permitted by this section, it shall be designed to store the difference between the postdevelopment runoff and the predevelopment runoff, less the amount infiltrated by the subsurface infiltration system and any appropriate credits for percolation and infiltration associated with any other measures employed in the system and the postpeak percolation credit.
[6] 
The construction of any facility utilized to control on-site runoff or drainage shall be designed to create a natural and aesthetically pleasing environment. Plants and soil native to the area shall be used for landscaping, to the maximum extent feasible. Special preference should be given to those species of trees and plants which have known pollutant removal abilities. When other ornamental plants are used, they shall be types compatible with the natural environment.
[7] 
Where depth to groundwater or other physical conditions preclude the use of a subsurface infiltration system as required by this section, then the applicant may request an exception. Any such request for an exception shall be accompanied by an engineering report explaining in detail why an exception is required and including all of the information required by this section which demonstrates the maximum feasible degree of compliance with these requirements.
[8] 
Subsurface infiltration systems shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the following requirements:
[a] 
All inlets from which collected runoff is conveyed to a subsurface infiltration system shall be equipped with oil/grease and sediment separators designed in accordance with the standard detail, which is Figure 8, Basin With Trap When Required, to this chapter.[4]
[4]
Editor's Note: Figure 8 is included as an attachment to this chapter.
[b] 
All subsurface infiltration systems shall conform to the detail for trench recharge systems, which is Figure 9,[5] to this chapter, and shall conform to the following requirements:
[i] 
Filter material shall cover the subsurface infiltration systems and extend the full width of the trench or bed, shall not be less than 12 inches deep beneath the bottom of the distribution line and shall extend at least six inches above the top of the line. If used in the calculations of storage capacity, the void volume of the stone shall be considered as 40%. The filter material shall be installed within an envelope of filter fabric of such mesh designed to inhibit migration of fines through the fabric. The fabric shall be installed along the sides and top of the trench. Fabric is not required on the bottom of the trench.
[ii] 
Perforated pipe shall be constructed true to the line and grade with open joints or perforations, except that at least one tight joint at each bend or other fitting shall be provided to prevent slippage. Bell and spigot pipe shall be laid with one-half-inch open joints at two-foot intervals, and the bottom of each joint shall contain a minimum of cement mortar to maintain an even flow line.
[iii] 
Perforated pipe shall not be laid at depths less than 24 inches.
[iv] 
Excavation for disposal beds or trenches may be made by machinery, provided that the adjacent soil will not be compacted. No excavation machinery shall be permitted in the excavation. When an excavation is carried below the required depth, it shall be brought up to the proper elevation with filter material.
[v] 
Subsurface infiltration systems shall not be constructed over impervious ground formations where such formations are less than 10 feet below the bottom elevation of the filter material of the subsurface infiltration system.
[vi] 
Subsurface infiltration systems shall not be built up by fill to more than two feet, unless an adequate grading plan has been approved. When subsurface infiltration systems are built up by fill to a depth exceeding two feet, the area of such fill shall extend at least 20 feet beyond the limits of the subsurface infiltration system, and the fill shall be of earth having a percolation value approximately equal to that of the ground over which the fill is placed. The percolation rates used for the design of a system infill shall be the volume found in the ground over which the fill is placed.
[vii] 
When perforated pipe must be laid with changes in either horizontal or vertical alignment, manholes must be installed at each changed alignment.
[viii] 
The percolating area of subsurface infiltration systems shall be considered as the total area of the system in square feet, except that any section of the trench containing pipe laid with tight joints, other than fittings as required in this section, shall not be considered in determining the percolation areas. Bottom or top areas shall not be included.
[ix] 
Catch basin inlets or manholes shall be constructed at the end of each subsurface infiltration system and at intervals not to exceed 600 feet. Catch basins shall have perforated bottoms or sumps.
[x] 
Precast concrete leaching pits are permitted for use as subsurface infiltration systems in site plans. When used, each pit shall include a manhole cover and frame to permit access.
[xi] 
The overflow structure in the terminus manhole shall be removable to facilitate maintenance.
[5]
Editor's Note: Figure 9 is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(d) 
Where the Township of Stafford has either approved a combination system or waived the underground infiltration system installation requirement as set forth in Subsection E(2)(c) in order to control stormwater, the design engineer, using the assumptions and factors for stormwater runoff and groundwater recharge calculations contained in Subsection D, shall either:
[1] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that the postdeveloped stormwater runoff hydrographs from the project site for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storms do not exceed, at any point in time, the site's predeveloped runoff hydrographs for the same storms;
[2] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that under postdeveloped site conditions:
[a] 
There is no increase in predeveloped stormwater runoff rates from the project site for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storms; and
[b] 
Any increased stormwater runoff volume or change in stormwater runoff timing for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storms will not increase flood damage at or downstream of the project site. When performing this analysis for predeveloped site conditions, all off-site development levels shall reflect existing conditions. When performing this analysis for postdeveloped site conditions, all off-site development levels shall reflect full development in accordance with current zoning and land use ordinances; or
[3] 
Demonstrate that the peak postdeveloped stormwater runoff rates from the project site for the two-, ten-, and one-hundred-year storms are 50%, 75% and 80%, respectively, of the site's peak predeveloped stormwater runoff rates for the same storms. Peak outflow rates from on-site stormwater measures for these storms shall be adjusted, where necessary, to account for the discharge of increased stormwater runoff rates and/or volumes from project site areas not controlled by the on-site measures. These percentages do not have to be applied to those portions of the project site that are not proposed for development at the time of application, provided that such areas are:
[a] 
Protected from future development by imposition of a conservation easement, deed restriction, or other acceptable legal measures; or
[b] 
Would be subject to review under these standards if they are proposed for any degree of development in the future.
(e) 
In tidal flood hazard areas, a stormwater runoff quantity analysis in accordance with Subsection E(2)(d)[1], [2] and [3] above shall only be applied if the increased volume of stormwater runoff could increase flood damages below the point of discharge.
(f) 
The standards for stormwater runoff quantity and rate required by this section shall be met using the methods, calculations and assumptions provided in Subsection D.
(3) 
Groundwater recharge standards.
(a) 
For all major developments, the design engineer, using the assumptions and factors for stormwater runoff and groundwater recharge calculations contained in Subsection D, shall either:
[1] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that the postdeveloped project site maintains 100% of the site's predeveloped average annual groundwater recharge volume; or
[2] 
Demonstrate through hydrologic and hydraulic analysis that any increase in the project site's stormwater runoff volume for the two-year, twenty-four-hour storm from predeveloped to postdeveloped conditions is infiltrated on site.
(b) 
The design engineer shall assess the hydraulic impact on the groundwater table and design the project site and all site groundwater recharge measures so as to avoid adverse hydraulic impacts. Adverse hydraulic impacts include, but are not limited to, raising the groundwater table so as to cause surface ponding; flooding of basements and other subsurface structures and areas; preventing a stormwater infiltration basin from completely draining via infiltration within 72 hours of a design storm event; and interference with the proper operation of subsurface sewage disposal systems and other surface and subsurface facilities in the vicinity of the groundwater recharge measure.
(c) 
The standards for groundwater recharge required by this section shall be met using the methods, calculations and assumptions provided in Subsection D.
(4) 
Erosion control standards. The minimum design and performance standards for erosion control are those established under the Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, N.J.S.A. 4:24-39 et seq., and its implementing regulations, N.J.A.C. 2:90-1.1 through 1.4.
(5) 
Stormwater runoff quality standards.
(a) 
There shall be no direct discharge of stormwater runoff from any point or nonpoint source to wetland, wetland transition area or any surface water body.
(b) 
Stormwater management measures shall be designed to reduce the total suspended solids (TSS) load in the stormwater runoff from the postdeveloped site by 80%, expressed as an annual average.
(c) 
Stormwater management measures shall also be designed to reduce the nutrient load in the stormwater runoff from the postdeveloped site by the maximum extent practicable. In achieving this reduction, the design of the development site shall include nonstructural and structural stormwater management measures that optimize nutrient removal while still achieving the groundwater recharge, runoff quantity and rate, and TSS removal standards in this section.
(d) 
The standards for stormwater runoff quality required by this section shall be met using the methods, calculations, assumptions and pollutant removal rates provided in Subsection D.
(e) 
Exceptions.
[1] 
The preceding stormwater runoff quality standards shall not apply to the following major development sites:
[a] 
Major development sites where less than 0.25 acre of additional impervious surface is proposed; or
[b] 
Major residential development sites that create less than one acre of disturbance.
[2] 
The TSS reduction requirement in Subsection E(6)(b) shall not apply to any stormwater runoff in a discharge regulated under a numeric effluent limitation for TSS imposed under the NJPDES rules (N.J.A.C. 7:14A) or in a discharge specifically exempt under an NJPDES permit from this requirement.
[3] 
The stormwater runoff quantity and rate standards in Subsection E(2) shall still be met for all major development sites.
(6) 
Additional stormwater quality standards for high pollutant loading areas and areas where stormwater runoff is exposed to source material.
(a) 
This subsection applies to the following areas of a major development as defined in Subsection A of this section:
[1] 
High pollutant loading areas (HPLAs); and
[2] 
Areas where stormwater is exposed to "source material."
(b) 
For a major development in areas described in Subsection E(5)(e)[1][a] or [b] above, in addition to the infiltration requirements specified in Subsection E(2)(c) and the groundwater recharge requirements specified in Subsection E(3), the applicant shall demonstrate in the land use planning and source control plan required in Subsection C(3)(d) that the following requirements have been met:
[1] 
The extent of the areas described Subsection E(5)(e)[1][a] or [b] above have been minimized on the development site to the maximum extent practicable;
[2] 
The stormwater runoff from the areas described in Subsection E(6)(a)[1] and [2] above is segregated to the maximum extent practicable from the stormwater runoff generated from the remainder of the site such that co-mingling of the stormwater runoff from the areas described in Subsection E(6)(a)[1] and [2] above and the remainder of the site will be minimized;
[3] 
The amount of precipitation falling directly on the areas described in Subsection E(6)(a)[1] and [2] above is minimized to the maximum extent practicable by means of a canopy, roof or other similar structure that reduces the generation of stormwater runoff; and
[4] 
The stormwater runoff from or co-mingled with the areas described in Subsection E(6)(a)[1] and [2] above for the water quality design storm, defined in Subsection D(2), Table 1, shall be subject to pretreatment by one or more of the following stormwater BMPs, designed in accordance with the New Jersey BMP Manual to provide 90% TSS removal:
[a] 
Bioretention system;
[b] 
Sand filter;
[c] 
Wet pond which shall be hydraulically disconnected by a minimum of two feet of vertical separation from the seasonal high water table and shall be designed to achieve a minimum eighty-percent TSS removal rate;
[d] 
Constructed stormwater wetlands; and/or
[e] 
Media filtration system manufactured treatment device with a minimum eighty-percent TSS removal as verified by the New Jersey Corporation for Advanced Technology and as certified by NJDEP
[5] 
If the potential for contamination of stormwater runoff by petroleum products exists on site, prior to being conveyed to the pretreatment BMP required in Subsection E(6)(b)[4] above, the stormwater runoff from the areas described in Subsection E(6)(a)[1] and [2] above shall be conveyed through an oil/grease separator or other equivalent manufactured filtering device to remove the petroleum hydrocarbons. The applicant shall provide the reviewing agency with sufficient data to demonstrate acceptable performance of the device.
(7) 
Threatened and endangered species and associated habitat standards. Stormwater management measures shall address the impacts of the development on habitat for threatened and endangered species, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.2(c), N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.27, and 7:50-6.33 and 34.
(8) 
Exceptions and mitigation requirements.
(a) 
Exceptions from strict compliance from the groundwater recharge, stormwater runoff quantity, and stormwater runoff quality requirements established by this section may be granted, at the discretion of the Township of Stafford, and subject to approval by the Pinelands Commission, provided that all of the following conditions are met:
[1] 
The exception is consistent with that allowed by the Township of Stafford;
[2] 
The Township of Stafford has an adopted and effective municipal stormwater management plan in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:8-4.4, which includes a mitigation plan in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:8-4.2(c)11, and is also certified by the Pinelands Commission. The mitigation plan shall identify what measures are necessary to offset the deficit created by granting the exception, and the municipality shall submit a written report to the county review agency and the NJDEP describing the exception and the required mitigation. Guidance for developing municipal stormwater management plans, including mitigation plans, is available from the NJDEP, Division of Watershed Management, and the New Jersey BMP Manual.
[3] 
The applicant demonstrates that mitigation, in addition to the requirements of the mitigation plan discussed in Subsection E(8)(a)[2] above, will be provided, consistent with one of the following options:
[a] 
Mitigation may be provided off site, but within the Pinelands Area and within the same drainage area as the development site, and shall meet or exceed the equivalent recharge, quality or quantity performance standard which is lacking on the development site due to the exception; or
[b] 
In lieu of the required mitigation, a monetary in-lieu contribution may be provided by the applicant to Stafford Township in accordance with the following:
[i] 
The amount of the in-lieu contribution shall be determined by Stafford Township, but the maximum in-lieu contribution required shall be equivalent to the cost of implementing and maintaining the stormwater management measure(s) for which the exception is granted.
[ii] 
The in-lieu contribution shall be used to fund an off-site stormwater control mitigation project(s) located within the Pinelands Area, within the same drainage area as the development site, and shall meet or exceed the equivalent recharge, quality or quantity performance standards which are lacking on the development site. Such mitigation project shall be identified by the Township of Stafford in the Township's adopted municipal stormwater management plan. The stormwater control project to which the monetary contribution will be applied shall be identified by Stafford Township at the time the exception is granted. The applicant shall amend the project description and site plan required in Subsection C(3)(c) to incorporate a description of both the standards for which an on-site exception is being granted and of the selected off-site mitigation project.
[iii] 
Stafford Township shall expend the in-lieu contribution to implement the selected off-site mitigation project within five years from the date that payment is received. Should Stafford Township fail to expend the in-lieu contribution within the required time frame, the mitigation option provided in Subsection E(8) of this section shall be void, and Stafford Township shall be prohibited from collecting in-lieu contributions.
(b) 
An exception from strict compliance granted in accordance with Subsection E(8)(a) above shall not constitute a waiver of strict compliance from the requirements of the Pinelands Comprehensive Management Plan at N.J.A.C. 7:50. An applicant should contact the Pinelands Commission to determine whether a waiver of strict compliance is also required in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:50, Subchapter 4, Part V.
F. 
Design, construction, and safety standards for structural stormwater management measures.
(1) 
General design and construction standards.
(a) 
Structural stormwater management measures shall be designed to meet the standards established in this section. These standards have been developed to protect public safety, conserve natural features, create an aesthetically pleasing site and promote proper on-site stormwater management.
(b) 
The following structural stormwater management measures may be utilized as part of a stormwater management system at a major land development in the Pinelands, provided that the applicant demonstrates that they are designed, constructed and maintained so as to meet the standards and requirements established by this section. If alternative stormwater management measures are proposed, the applicant shall demonstrate that the selected measures will achieve the standards established by this section.
[1] 
Bioretention systems;
[2] 
Constructed stormwater wetlands;
[3] 
Extended detention basins;
[4] 
Infiltration basins;
[5] 
Vegetated filter strips;
[6] 
Infiltration basins and trenches;
[7] 
Wet ponds with suitable liners;
[8] 
Pervious paving systems; and
[9] 
Manufactured treatment devices, provided their pollutant removal rates are verified by the New Jersey Corporation for Advanced Technology and certified by the NJDEP.
[10] 
Subsurface infiltration systems.
(c) 
Structural stormwater management measures shall be designed to take into account the existing site conditions, including environmentally critical areas, wetlands, flood-prone areas, slopes, depth to seasonal high water table, soil type, permeability and texture, and drainage area and drainage patterns.
(d) 
Structural stormwater management measures shall be designed and constructed to be strong, durable, and corrosion resistant (measures that are consistent with the relevant portions of the Residential Site Improvement Standards at N.J.A.C. 5:21-7.3, 5:21-7.4 and 5:21-7.8 shall be deemed to meet this requirement); to minimize and facilitate maintenance and repairs; and to ensure proper functioning.
(e) 
For all stormwater management measures at a development site, each applicant shall submit a detailed inspection, maintenance and repair plan consistent with the requirements of Subsection G of this section.
(f) 
To the maximum extent practicable, the design engineer shall design structural stormwater management measures on the development site in a manner that:
[1] 
Limits site disturbance, maximizes stormwater management efficiencies, and maintains or improves aesthetic conditions.
[2] 
Utilizes multiple stormwater management measures, smaller in size and distributed spatially throughout the land development site, instead of a single larger structural stormwater management measure.
[3] 
Incorporates pretreatment measures. Pretreatment can extend the functional life and increase the pollutant removal capability of a structural stormwater management measure. Pretreatment measures may be designed in accordance with the New Jersey BMP Manual or other sources approved by the Municipal Engineer.
(g) 
Stormwater management basins shall be designed in a manner that complements and mimics the existing natural landscape, including but not limited to the following design strategies:
[1] 
Use of natural, non-wetland wooded depressions for stormwater runoff storage; and
[2] 
Establishment of attractive landscaping in and around the basin that mimics the existing vegetation and incorporates native Pinelands plants, including, but not limited to, the species listed in N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.25 and 7:50-6.26.
(h) 
Stormwater management basins proposed as part of a subdivision or residential use site plan shall be located entirely within a separate lot, with ownership to be by an established homeowners' association established in accordance with state statutes and requirements of the Township Land Development Ordinance. Maintenance and repair shall be in conformance with Revised General Ordinances of the Township of Stafford, § 130-79, Stormwater maintenance and repair of system, nonresidential.
(i) 
Stormwater management basins shall be designed with gently sloping sides. The maximum allowable basin side slope shall be three horizontal to one vertical.
(j) 
Guidance on the design and construction of structural stormwater management measures may be found in the New Jersey BMP Manual. Other guidance sources may also be used upon approval by the Municipal Engineer.
(k) 
After all construction activities and required field testing have been completed on the development site, as-built plans depicting design and as-built elevations of all stormwater management measures shall be prepared by a licensed land surveyor and submitted to the Municipal Engineer. Based upon the Municipal Engineer's review of the as-built plans, all corrections or remedial actions deemed by the Municipal Engineer to be necessary due to the failure to comply with the standards established by this section and/or any reasons of public health or safety shall be completed by the applicant.
(2) 
Design and construction standards for stormwater infiltration BMPs.
(a) 
Stormwater infiltration BMPs, such as bioretention systems with infiltration, dry wells, infiltration basins, pervious paving systems with storage beds, and sand filters with infiltration, and subsurface infiltration systems shall be designed, constructed and maintained to completely drain the total runoff volume generated by the basin's maximum design storm within 72 hours after a storm event. Runoff storage for greater times can render the BMP ineffective and may result in anaerobic conditions, odor and both water quality and mosquito breeding problems.
(b) 
Stormwater infiltration BMPs shall be designed, constructed and maintained to provide a minimum separation of at least two feet between the elevation of the lowest point of the bottom of the infiltration BMP and the seasonal high water table.
(c) 
A stormwater infiltration BMP shall be sited in suitable soils verified by field testing to have permeability rates between one inch and 20 inches per hour. If such site soils do not exist or if the design engineer demonstrates that it is not practical for engineering, environmental or safety reasons to site the stormwater infiltration BMP(s) in such soils, then the stormwater infiltration BMP(s) may be sited in soils verified by field testing to have permeability rates in excess of 20 inches per hour, provided that a bioretention system, designed, installed and maintained in accordance with the New Jersey BMP Manual, is installed to meet one of the following conditions:
[1] 
The bioretention system is constructed as a separate measure designed to provide pretreatment of stormwater and to convey the pretreated stormwater into the infiltration BMP; or
[2] 
The bioretention system is integrated into and made part of the infiltration BMP and, as such, does not require an underdrain system. If this option is selected, the infiltration BMP shall be designed and constructed so that the maximum water depth in the bioretention system portion of the BMP during treatment of the stormwater quality design storm is 12 inches in accordance with the New Jersey BMP Manual.
(d) 
The minimum design permeability rate for the soil within a BMP that relies on infiltration shall be 0.5 inch per hour. A factor of safety of two shall be applied to the soil's field-tested permeability rate to determine the soil's design permeability rate. (For example, if the field-tested permeability rate of the soil is four inches per hour, its design permeability rate would be two inches per hour.) The minimum design permeability rate for the soil within a stormwater infiltration basin shall also be sufficient to achieve the minimum seventy-two-hour drain time described in Subsection F(2)(a) above. The maximum design permeability shall be 10 inches per hour.
(e) 
A soil's field tested permeability rate shall be determined in accordance with the following:
[1] 
The predevelopment field test permeability rate shall be determined according to the methodologies provided in Subsection H(3)(c) of this section;
[2] 
The results of the required field permeability tests shall demonstrate a minimum tested infiltration rate of one inch per hour;
[3] 
After all construction activities have been completed on the site and the finished grade has been established in the infiltration BMP, postdevelopment field permeability tests shall also be conducted according to the methodologies provided in Subsection H(3)(c) of this section;
[4] 
If the results of the postdevelopment field permeability tests fail to achieve the minimum required design permeability rates in Subsection F(2)(d) above utilizing a factor of safety of two, the stormwater infiltration BMP shall be renovated and retested until such minimum required design permeability rates are achieved; and
[5] 
The results of all field permeability tests shall be certified by a professional engineer and transmitted to the Municipal Engineer.
(f) 
To help ensure maintenance of the design permeability rate over time, a six-inch layer of K5 soil shall be placed on the bottom of a stormwater infiltration BMP. This soil layer shall meet the textural and permeability specifications of a K5 soil as provided at N.J.A.C. 7:9A, Appendix A, Figure 6, and be certified to meet these specifications by a professional engineer licensed in the State of New Jersey. The depth to the seasonal high water table shall be measured from the bottom of the K5 sand layer.
(g) 
The design engineer shall assess the hydraulic impact on the groundwater table and design the project site and all stormwater infiltration basins so as to avoid adverse hydraulic impacts. Adverse hydraulic impacts include, but are not limited to, raising the groundwater table so as to cause surface ponding; flooding of basements and other subsurface structures and areas; preventing a stormwater infiltration basin from completely draining via infiltration within 72 hours of a design storm event; and interference with the proper operation of subsurface sewage disposal systems and other surface and subsurface structures in the vicinity of the stormwater infiltration basin.
(h) 
The design engineer shall conduct a groundwater mounding analysis, as defined in Subsection A, of all stormwater infiltration BMPs. The mounding analysis shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements in Subsection H(3)(c)[12]. Where the mounding analysis identifies adverse impacts, the stormwater infiltration BMP shall be redesigned or relocated, as appropriate.
(i) 
Stormwater infiltration BMPs shall be constructed in accordance with the following:
[1] 
To avoid sedimentation that may result in clogging and reduce the basin's permeability rate, stormwater infiltration basins shall be constructed according to the following:
[a] 
Unless the conditions in Subsection F(2)(i)[1][b] below are met, a stormwater infiltration basin shall not be placed into operation until its drainage area is completely stabilized. Instead, upstream runoff shall be diverted around the basin and into separate, temporary stormwater management facilities and sediment basins. Such temporary facilities and basins shall be installed and utilized for stormwater management and sediment control until stabilization is achieved in accordance with the Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey, which is incorporated herein by reference, as amended and supplemented.
[b] 
If the design engineer determines that, for engineering, environmental or safety reasons, temporary stormwater management facilities and sediment basins cannot be constructed on the site, the stormwater infiltration basin may be placed into operation prior to the complete stabilization of its drainage area, provided that the basin's bottom during this period is constructed at a depth at least two feet higher than its final design elevation. All other infiltration BMP construction requirements in this section shall be followed. When the drainage area is completely stabilized, all accumulated sediment shall be removed from the infiltration BMP, which shall then be excavated to its final design elevation in accordance with the construction requirements of this section and the performance standards in Subsection E.
[2] 
To avoid compaction of subgrade soils of BMPs that rely on infiltration, no heavy equipment such as backhoes, dump trucks or bulldozers shall be permitted to operate within the footprint of the BMP. All excavation required to construct a stormwater infiltration BMP shall be performed by equipment placed outside the BMP. If this is not possible, the soils within the excavated area shall be renovated and tilled after construction is completed to reverse the effects of compaction. In addition, postdevelopment soil permeability testing shall be performed in accordance with Subsection F(2)(e) of this section.
[3] 
Earthwork associated with stormwater infiltration BMP construction, including excavation, grading, cutting or filling, shall not be performed when soil moisture content is above the lower plastic limit.
(3) 
Safety standards for structural stormwater management measures. This Subsection F(3) sets forth requirements to protect public safety through the proper design and operation of stormwater management basins. This subsection applies to any new stormwater management basin.
(a) 
If a structural stormwater management measure has an outlet structure, escape provisions shall be incorporated in or on the structure. "Escape provisions" means the permanent installation of ladders, steps, rungs, or other features that provide readily accessible means of ingress and egress from the outlet structure.
(b) 
A trash rack is a device intended to intercept runoff-borne trash and debris that might otherwise block the hydraulic openings in an outlet structure of a structural stormwater management measure. Trash racks shall be installed upstream of such outlet structure openings as necessary to ensure proper functioning of the structural stormwater management measure in accordance with the following:
[1] 
The trash rack should be constructed primarily of bars aligned in the direction of flow with one-inch spacing between the bars to the elevation of the water quality design storm. For elevations higher than the water quality design storm, the bars shall be spaced no greater than 1/3 the width of the hydraulic opening it is protecting or six inches, whichever is less. Transverse bars aligned perpendicular to flow should be sized and spaced as necessary for rack stability and strength.
[2] 
The trash rack shall not adversely affect the hydraulic performance of either the outlet structure opening it is protecting or the overall outlet structure.
[3] 
The trash rack shall have sufficient net open area under clean conditions to limit the peak design storm velocity through it to a maximum of 2.5 feet per second.
[4] 
The trash rack shall be constructed and installed to be rigid, durable, and corrosion resistant and shall be designed to withstand a perpendicular live loading of 300 pounds per square foot.
(c) 
An overflow grate is a device intended to protect the opening in the top of a stormwater management measure outlet structure. If an outlet structure has an overflow grate, such grate shall meet the following requirements:
[1] 
The overflow grate shall be secured to the outlet structure but removable for emergencies and maintenance;
[2] 
The overflow grate spacing shall be no more than two inches across the smallest dimension; and
[3] 
The overflow grate shall be constructed and installed to be rigid, durable, and corrosion resistant and shall be designed to withstand a perpendicular live loading of 300 pounds per square foot.
(d) 
The maximum side slope for an earthen dam, embankment, or berm shall not be steeper than three horizontal to one vertical.
(e) 
Safety ledges shall be constructed on the slopes of all new structural stormwater management measures having a permanent pool of water deeper than 2.5 feet. Such safety ledges shall be comprised of two steps. Each step shall be four feet to six feet in width. One step shall be located approximately 2.5 feet below the permanent water surface, and the second step shall be located one foot to 1.5 feet above the permanent water surface. See Subsection F(3)(e)[1], below, for an illustration of safety ledges in a stormwater management basin.
[1] 
Illustration of safety ledges.
Source: N.J.A.C. 7:8-6, Appendix A.
G. 
Inspection, maintenance and repair of stormwater management measures.
(1) 
Applicability. Projects subject to review pursuant to Subsection B(3) of this section shall comply with the requirements of Subsection G(2) and (3) below. In addition, refer to the Revised General Ordinances of the Township of Stafford, § 130-79, for additional maintenance provisions.
(2) 
General inspection, maintenance and repair plan.
(a) 
The design engineer shall prepare an inspection, maintenance and repair plan for the stormwater management measures, including both structural and nonstructural measures incorporated into the design of a major development. This plan shall be submitted as part of the checklist requirements established in Subsection C(3). Inspection and maintenance guidelines for stormwater management measures are available in the New Jersey BMP Manual.
(b) 
The inspection, maintenance and repair plan shall contain the following:
[1] 
Accurate and comprehensive drawings of the site's stormwater management measures;
[2] 
Specific locations of each stormwater management measure identified by means of longitude and latitude as well as block and lot number;
[3] 
Specific preventative and corrective maintenance tasks and schedules for such tasks for each stormwater BMP;
[4] 
Cost estimates, including estimated cost of sediment, debris or trash removal; and
[5] 
The name, address and telephone number of the person or persons responsible for regular inspections and preventative and corrective maintenance (including repair and replacement). If the responsible person or persons is a corporation, company, partnership, firm, association, municipality or political subdivision of this state, the name and telephone number of an appropriate contact person shall also be included.
(c) 
The person responsible for inspection, maintenance and repair identified under Subsection G(2)(b) above shall maintain a detailed log of all preventative and corrective maintenance performed for the site's stormwater management measures, including a record of all inspections and copies of all maintenance-related work orders in the inspection, maintenance and repair plan. Said records and inspection reports shall be retained for a minimum of five years.
(d) 
If the inspection, maintenance and repair plan identifies a person other than the developer (for example, a public agency or homeowners' association) as having the responsibility for inspection and maintenance, the plan shall include documentation of such person's agreement to assume this responsibility or of the developer's obligation to dedicate a stormwater management measure to such person under an applicable ordinance or regulation.
(e) 
If the person responsible for inspection, maintenance and repair identified under Subsection G(2)(c) above is not a public agency, the maintenance plan and any future revisions based on Subsection G(2)(f) below shall be recorded upon the deed of record for each property on which the maintenance described in the maintenance plan shall be undertaken.
(f) 
The person responsible for inspection, maintenance and repair identified under Subsection G(2)(b) above shall evaluate the effectiveness of the inspection, maintenance and repair plan at least once per year and update the plan and the deed as needed.
(g) 
The person responsible for inspection, maintenance and repair identified under Subsection G(2)(b) above shall submit the updated inspection, maintenance and repair plan and the documentation required by Subsection G(2)(b) and (c) above to Stafford Township once per year.
(h) 
The person responsible for inspection, maintenance and repair identified under Subsection G(2)(b) above shall retain and make available, upon request by any public entity with administrative, health, environmental or safety authority over the site, the inspection, maintenance and repair plan and the documentation required by Subsection G(2)(b) and (c) above.
(3) 
Responsibility for inspection, repair and maintenance shall not be assigned or transferred to the owner or tenant of an individual property in a residential development or project, unless such owner or tenant owns or leases the entire residential development or project.
(4) 
Preventative and corrective maintenance shall be performed to maintain the function of the stormwater management measure, including, but not limited to, repairs or replacement to any associated appurtenance of the measure; removal of sediment, debris, or trash; restoration of eroded areas; snow and ice removal; fence repair or replacement; restoration of vegetation; repair or replacement of linings; and restoration of infiltration function.
(5) 
Stormwater management measure easements shall be provided by the property owner as necessary for facility inspections and maintenance and preservation of stormwater runoff conveyance, infiltration, and detention areas and facilities. The purpose of the easement shall be specified in the maintenance agreement.
(6) 
In the event that the stormwater management measure becomes a public health nuisance or danger to public safety or public health, or if it is in need of maintenance or repair, the Township of Stafford shall so notify the responsible person in writing. Upon receipt of that notice, the responsible person shall have 14 days to effect maintenance and repair of the facility in a manner that is approved by the Municipal Engineer or the Municipal Engineer's designee. Stafford Township, at its discretion, may extend the time allowed for effecting maintenance and repair for good cause. If the responsible person fails or refuses to perform such maintenance and repair within the allowable time, Stafford Township may immediately proceed to do so with its own forces and equipment and/or through contractors. The costs and expenses of such maintenance and repair by Stafford Township shall be entered on the tax roll as a special charge against the property and collected with any other taxes levied thereon for the year in which the maintenance and repair was performed.
(7) 
Requirements for inspection, maintenance and repair of stormwater BMPs that rely on infiltration.
(a) 
If a stormwater infiltration BMP is incorporated into the design of a major development, the applicant shall include the following requirements in its inspection, maintenance and repair plan:
[1] 
Once per month (if needed): Mow side slopes, remove litter and debris, stabilize eroded banks, repair erosion at inflow structure(s);
[2] 
After every storm exceeding one inch of rainfall: Ensure that infiltration BMPs drain completely within 72 hours after the storm event. If stored water fails to infiltrate 72 hours after the end of the storm, corrective measures shall be taken. Raking or tilling by light equipment can assist in maintaining infiltration capacity and break up clogged surfaces;
[3] 
Four times per year (quarterly): Inspect stormwater infiltration BMPs for clogging and excessive debris and sediment accumulation within the BMP; remove sediment (if needed) when completely dry;
[4] 
Two times per year: Inspect for signs of damage to structures, repair eroded areas, check for signs of petroleum contamination and remediate;
[5] 
Once per year: Inspect BMPs for unwanted tree growth and remove if necessary; disc or otherwise aerate bottom of infiltration basin to a minimum depth of six inches; and
[6] 
After every storm exceeding one inch of rainfall, inspect and, if necessary, remove and replace K5 sand layer and accumulated sediment, to restore original infiltration rate.
(b) 
Additional guidance for the inspection, maintenance and repair of stormwater infiltration BMPs can be found in the New Jersey BMP Manual.
(8) 
Financing of inspection, maintenance and repair of stormwater BMPs. An adequate means of ensuring permanent financing of the inspection, maintenance and repair of stormwater BMPs shall be implemented and detailed in the inspection, maintenance and repair plan. Permanent financing of the inspection, maintenance and repair of stormwater BMPs shall be accomplished by:
(a) 
The assumption of the inspection and maintenance program by a homeowners' association or property owner.
H. 
Appendixes.
(1) 
Methods for calculating groundwater recharge.
(a) 
The New Jersey Geological Survey Report GSR-32: A Method for Evaluating Ground-Water Recharge Areas in New Jersey. Available at http://www.njgeology.org/geodata/dgs99-2.htm.
(b) 
The New Jersey Groundwater Recharge Spreadsheet (NJGRS). Available in the New Jersey BMP Manual, Chapter 6, at http://www.njstormwater.org/bmp_manual2.htm.
(2) 
NJDEP nonstructural strategies point system. The New Jersey Stormwater Management Rules at N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.2(A) and Subsection E(1) of this section, require nonstructural stormwater management strategies to be incorporated into the site design of a major development. A total of nine strategies are to be used to the maximum extent practical to meet the groundwater recharge, stormwater quality and stormwater quantity requirements of the rules prior to utilizing structural stormwater management measures. The New Jersey Nonstructural Stormwater Management Strategies Point System (NSPS) provides a tool to assist planners, designers and regulators in determining that the strategies have been used to the "maximum extent practical" at a major development as required by the rules. Refer online to http://www.njstormwater.org for information on the NSPS.
(3) 
Soils.
(a) 
USDA soil textural triangle.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture.
(b) 
Definitions. For the purposes of this appendix, the following terms shall have the meanings herein ascribed to them:
A-HORIZON
The uppermost mineral horizon in a normal soil profile. The upper part of the A-horizon is characterized by maximum accumulation of finely divided, dark-colored organic residues, known as humus, which are intimately mixed with the mineral particles of the soil.
ARTESIAN ZONE OF SATURATION
A zone of saturation which exists immediately below a hydraulically restrictive horizon and which has an upper surface which is at a pressure greater than atmospheric, either seasonally or throughout the year.
CHROMA
The relative purity or strength of a color, a quantity which decreases with increasing grayness. Chroma is one of the three variables of soil color as defined in the Munsell system of classification.
CLAY
A particle size category consisting of mineral particles which are smaller than 0.002 millimeters in equivalent spherical diameter. Also, a soil textural class having more than 40% clay, less than 45% sand, and less than 40% silt, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
CLAY LOAM
A soil textural class having 27% to 40% clay and 20% to 45% sand, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
COARSE FRAGMENT
A rock fragment contained within the soil which is greater than two millimeters in equivalent spherical diameter or which is retained on a two-millimeter sieve.
COUNTY SOIL SURVEY REPORT
A report prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, which includes maps showing the distribution of soil mapping units throughout a particular county, together with narrative descriptions of the soil series shown and other information relating to the uses and properties of the various soil series.
DIRECT SUPERVISION
Control over and direction of work carried out by others with full knowledge of and responsibility for such work.
EQUIVALENT SPHERICAL DIAMETER OF A PARTICLE
The diameter of a sphere which has a volume equal to the volume of the particle.
EXCESSIVELY COARSE HORIZON
A horizon of limited thickness within the soil profile which provides inadequate removal of pollutants from stormwater due to a high coarse fragment content, excessively coarse texture and/or excessively rapid permeability.
EXCESSIVELY COARSE SUBSTRATUM
A substratum below the soil profile which extends beyond the depth of soil profile pits and borings and which provides inadequate removal of pollutants from stormwater due to a high coarse fragment content, excessively coarse texture and/or excessively rapid permeability.
EXTREMELY FIRM CONSISTENCE
A type of soil material whose moist aggregated mass crushes only under very strong pressure; cannot be crushed between the thumb and forefinger and shall be broken apart bit by bit.
FIRM CONSISTENCE
A type of soil material whose moist aggregated mass crushes under moderate pressure between the thumb and forefinger, but resistance is distinctly noticeable.
HARD CONSISTENCE
A type of soil material whose dry aggregated mass is moderately resistant to pressure; can be broken in the hands without difficulty but is barely breakable between the thumb and forefinger.
HUE
The dominant spectral color, one of the three variables of soil color defined within the Munsell system of classification.
HYDRAULICALLY RESTRICTIVE HORIZON
A horizon within the soil profile which slows or prevents the downward or lateral movement of water and which is underlain by permeable soil horizons or substrata. Any soil horizon which has a saturated permeability less than one inch per hour is hydraulically restrictive.
HYDRAULICALLY RESTRICTIVE SUBSTRATUM
A substratum below the soil profile which slows or prevents the downward or lateral movement of water and which extends beyond the depth of profile pits or borings or to a massive substratum. A substratum which has a saturated permeability less than one inch per hour is hydraulically restrictive.
LOAMY SAND
A soil textural class, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle), that has a maximum of 85% to 90% sand with a percentage of silt plus 1.5 times the percentage of clay not in excess of 15%, or a minimum of 70% to 85% sand with a percentage of silt plus 1.5 times the percentage of clay not in excess of 30%.
LOWER PLASTIC LIMIT
The moisture content corresponding to the transition between the plastic and semisolid states of soil consistency. This corresponds to the lowest soil moisture content at which the soil can be molded in the fingers to form a rod or wire, 1/8 inch in thickness, without crumbling.
MOTTLING
A color pattern observed in soil consisting of blotches or spots of contrasting color. The term "mottle" refers to an individual blotch or spot. The terms "color variegation," "iron depletion" and "iron concentration" are equivalent to the term "mottling." Mottling due to redoximorphic reactions is an indication of seasonal or periodic and recurrent saturation.
MUNSELL SYSTEM
A system of classifying soil color consisting of an alphanumeric designation for hue, value and chroma, such as "7.5 YR 6/2," together with a descriptive color name, such as "strong brown."
O-HORIZON
A surface horizon, occurring above the A-horizon in some soils, which is composed primarily of undecomposed or partially decomposed plant remains which have not been incorporated into the mineral soil.
PERCHED ZONE OF SATURATION
A zone of saturation which occurs immediately above a hydraulically restrictive horizon and which is underlain by permeable horizons or substrata which are not permanently or seasonally saturated.
PIEZOMETER
A device consisting of a length of metal or plastic pipe, open at the bottom or perforated within a specified interval, and used for the determination of depth to water, permeability or hydraulic head within a specific soil horizon or substratum.
PLATY STRUCTURE
Characterized by a soil aggregate which has one axis distinctly shorter than the other two and is oriented with the short axis vertical.
REGIONAL ZONE OF SATURATION
A zone of saturation which extends vertically without interruption below the depth of soil borings and profile pits.
SANDY CLAY
A soil textural class having 35% or more of clay and 45% or more of sand, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
SANDY LOAM
A soil textural class, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle), that has a maximum of 20% clay, and the percentage of silt plus twice the percentage of clay exceeds 30, and contains 52% or more sand; or less than 7% clay, less than 50% silt, and between 43% and 52% sand.
SILT
A particle size category consisting of mineral particles which are between 0.002 and 0.05 millimeters in equivalent spherical diameter. It also means a soil textural class having 80% or more of silt and 12% or less of clay, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
SILT LOAM
A soil textural class having 50% or more of silt and 12% to 27% of clay; or 50% to 80% of silt and less than 12% of clay, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
SILTY CLAY
A soil textural class having 40% or more of clay and 40% or more of silt, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
SILTY CLAY LOAM
A soil textural class having 27% to 40% of clay and less than 20% of sand, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a) (USDA soil textural triangle).
SOIL AGGREGATE
A naturally occurring unit of soil structure consisting of particles of sand, silt, clay, organic matter, and coarse fragments held together by the natural cohesion of the soil.
SOIL COLOR
The soil color name and Munsell color designation determined by comparison of the moist soil with color chips contained in a Munsell soil color book.
SOIL CONSISTENCE
The resistance of a soil aggregate or clod to being crushed between the fingers or broken by the hands. Terms for describing soil consistence described are in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-5.3(h).
SOIL HORIZON
A layer within a soil profile differing from layers of soil above and below it in one or more of the soil morphological characteristics, including color, texture, coarse fragment content, structure, consistence and mottling.
SOIL LOG
A description of the soil profile which includes the depth, thickness, color, texture, coarse fragment content, mottling, structure and consistence of each soil horizon or substratum.
SOIL MAPPING UNIT
An area outlined on a map in a county soil survey report and marked with a letter symbol designating a soil phase, a complex of two or more soil phases, or some other descriptive term where no soil type has been identified.
SOIL PHASE
A specific type of soil which is mapped by the Natural Resources Conservation Service and which belongs to a soil series described within the county soil survey report.
SOIL PROFILE
A vertical cross section of undisturbed soil showing the characteristic horizontal layers or horizons of the soil which have formed as a result of the combined effects of parent material, topography, climate, biological activity and time.
SOIL SERIES
A grouping of soil types possessing a specific range of soil profile characteristics which are described within the county soil survey report. Each soil series may consist of several soil phases which may differ in slope, texture of the surface horizon, or stoniness.
SOIL STRUCTURAL CLASS
One of the shape classes of soil structure described in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-5.3(g).
SOIL STRUCTURE
The naturally occurring arrangement, within a soil horizon, of sand, silt and clay particles, coarse fragments and organic matter, which are held together in clusters or aggregates of similar shape and size.
SOIL TEST PIT
An excavation made for the purpose of exposing a soil profile which is to be described.
SOIL TEXTURAL CLASS
One of the classes of soil texture defined within the USDA system of classification. (Soil Survey Manual, Agricultural Handbook No. 18, USDA Soil Conservation Service, 1962.)
SOIL TEXTURE
The relative proportions of sand, silt and clay in that portion of the soil which passes through a sieve with two-millimeter openings.
STATIC WATER LEVEL
The depth below the ground surface or the elevation, with respect to some reference level, of the water level observed within a soil profile pit or boring, or within a piezometer, after this level has stabilized or become relatively constant with the passage of time.
SUBSTRATUM
A layer of soil or rock material present below the soil profile and extending beyond the depth of soil borings or profile pits.
UNSUITABLE SOIL
All soil other than suitable soil.
USDA SYSTEM OF CLASSIFICATION
The system of classifying soil texture used by the United States Department of Agriculture which defines 12 soil textural classes based upon the weight percentages of sand, silt and clay in that portion of the soil which passes through a sieve with two-millimeter openings. The soil textural classes are shown graphically on the USDA soil textural triangle, as shown in Subsection H(3)(a).
VALUE
The relative lightness or intensity of a color, one of the three variables of soil color defined within the Munsell system of classification.
VERY FIRM CONSISTENCE
Characterized by a moist soil which crushes under strong pressure; barely crushable between the thumb and forefinger.
VERY HARD CONSISTENCE
Characterized by a dry soil which is resistant to pressure, can be broken in the hands only with difficulty; not breakable between the thumb and forefinger.
ZONE OF SATURATION
A layer within or below the soil profile which is saturated with groundwater either seasonally or throughout the year. This includes both regional and perched zones.
(c) 
Methods for assessing soil suitability for infiltration stormwater management BMPs. The results of a subsurface investigation shall serve as the basis for the site selection and design of stormwater infiltration BMPs. The subsurface investigation shall include, but not be limited to, a series of soil test pits and soil permeability tests conducted in accordance with the following:
[1] 
All soil test pits and soil permeability results shall be performed under the direct supervision of a professional engineer. All soil logs and permeability test data shall be accompanied by a certification by a professional engineer. The results and location (horizontal and vertical) of all soil test pits and soil permeability tests, both passing and failing, shall be reported to Stafford Township.
[2] 
During all subsurface investigations and soil test procedures, adequate safety measures shall be taken to prohibit unauthorized access to the excavations at all times. It is the responsibility of persons performing or witnessing subsurface investigations and soil permeability tests to comply with all applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations governing occupational safety.
[3] 
A minimum of two soil test pits shall be excavated within the footprint of any proposed infiltration BMP to determine the suitability and distribution of soil types present at the site. Placement of the test pits shall be within 20 feet of the basin perimeter, located along the longest axis bisecting the BMP. For BMPs larger than 10,000 square feet in area, a minimum of one additional soil test pit shall be conducted within each additional area of 10,000 square feet. The additional test pit(s) shall be placed approximately equidistant to other test pits, so as to provide adequate characterization of the subsurface material. In all cases, where soil and or groundwater properties vary significantly, additional test pits shall be excavated in order to accurately characterize the subsurface conditions below the proposed infiltration BMP. Soil test pits shall extend to a minimum depth of eight feet below the lowest elevation of the basin bottom or to a depth that is at least two times the maximum potential water depth in the proposed infiltration BMP, whichever is greater.
[4] 
A soil test pit log shall be prepared for each soil test pit. The test pit log shall, at a minimum, provide the elevation of the existing ground surface, the depth and thickness (in inches) of each soil horizon or substratum, the dominant matrix or background and mottle colors using the Munsell system of classification for hue, value and chroma, the appropriate textural class as shown on the USDA textural triangle, the volume percentage of coarse fragments (larger than two millimeters in diameter), the abundance, size, and contrast of mottles, the soil structure, soil consistence, and soil moisture condition, using standard USDA classification terminology for each of these soil properties. Soil test pit logs shall identify the presence of any soil horizon, substratum or other feature that exhibits an in-place permeability rate of less than one inch per hour.
[5] 
Each soil test pit log shall report the depth to seasonally high water level, either perched or regional, and the static water level based upon the presence of soil mottles or other redoximorphic features, and observed seepage or saturation. Where redoximorphic features, including soil mottles resulting from soil saturation, are present, they shall be interpreted to represent the depth to the seasonal high water table unless soil saturation or seepage is observed at a higher level. When the determination of the seasonally high water table shall be made in ground previously disturbed by excavation, direct observation of the static water table during the months of January through April shall be the only method permitted.
[6] 
Any soil horizon or substratum which exists immediately below a perched zone of saturation shall be deemed by rule to exhibit unacceptable permeability (less than one inch per hour). The perched zone of saturation may be observed directly, inferred based upon soil morphology, or confirmed by performance of a hydraulic head test as defined at N.J.A.C. 7:9A-5.9.
[7] 
Stormwater infiltration BMPs shall not be installed in soils that exhibit artesian groundwater conditions. A permeability test shall be conducted in all soils that immediately underlie a perched zone of saturation. Any zone of saturation which is present below a soil horizon which exhibits an in-place permeability of less than 0.2 inch per hour shall be considered an artesian zone of saturation unless a minimum one-foot-thick zone of unsaturated soil, free of mottling or other redoximorphic features and possessing a chroma of four or higher, exists immediately below the unsuitable soil.
[8] 
A minimum of one permeability test shall be performed at each soil test pit location. The soil permeability rate shall be determined using test methodology as prescribed in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.2 (tube permeameter test), 6.5 (pit-bailing test) or 6.6 (piezometer test). When the tube permeameter test is used, a minimum of two replicate samples shall be taken and tested. Alternative permeability test procedures may be accepted by the approving authority, provided the test procedure attains saturation of surrounding soils, accounts for hydraulic head effects on infiltration rates, provides a permeability rate with units expressed in inches per hour and is accompanied by a published source reference. Examples of suitable sources include hydrogeology, geotechnical or engineering text and design manuals, proceedings of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) symposia, or peer-review journals. Neither a soil permeability class rating test, as described in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.3, nor a percolation test, as described in N.J.A.C. 7:9A-6.4, are acceptable tests for establishing permeability values for the purpose of complying with this section.
[9] 
Soil permeability tests shall be conducted on the most hydraulically restrictive horizon or substratum to be left in place below the basin as follows: Where no soil replacement is proposed, the permeability tests shall be conducted on the most hydraulically restrictive horizon or substratum within four feet of the lowest elevation of the basin bottom or to a depth equal to two times the maximum potential water depth within the basin, whichever is greater. Where soil replacement is proposed, the permeability tests shall be conducted within the soil immediately below the depth of proposed soil replacement or within the most hydraulically restrictive horizon or substratum to a depth equal to two times the maximum potential water depth within the basin, whichever is greater. Permeability tests may be performed on the most hydraulically restrictive soil horizons or substrata at depths greater than those identified above based upon the discretion of the design or testing engineer. The tested infiltration rate should then be divided by two to establish the soil's design permeability rate. Such division will provide a one-hundred-percent safety factor to the tested rate.
[10] 
The minimum acceptable "tested permeability rate" of any soil horizon or substratum shall be one inch per hour. Soil materials that exhibit tested permeability rates slower than one inch per hour shall be considered unsuitable for stormwater infiltration. The maximum reportable tested permeability rate of any soil horizon or substratum shall be no greater than 20 inches per hour, regardless of the rate attained in the test procedure.
[11] 
After all construction activities have been completed on the development site and the finished grade has been established in the infiltration BMP, a minimum of one permeability test shall be conducted within the most hydraulically restrictive soil horizon or substratum below the as-built BMP to ensure the performance of the infiltration BMP is as designed. Hand tools and manual permeability test procedures shall be used for the purpose of confirming BMP performance. In addition, the infiltration BMP shall be flooded with water sufficient to demonstrate the performance of the BMP. Test results shall be certified to the Municipal Engineer.
[12] 
A groundwater mounding analysis shall be provided for each stormwater infiltration BMP. The groundwater mounding analysis shall calculate the maximum height of the groundwater mound based upon the volume of the maximum design storm. The professional engineer conducting the analysis shall provide the Municipal Engineer with the methodology and supporting documentation for the mounding analysis used and shall certify to Stafford Township, based upon the analysis, that the groundwater mound will not cause stormwater or groundwater to break out to the land surface or cause adverse impact to adjacent surface water bodies, wetlands or subsurface structures, including, but not limited to, basements and septic systems. If there is more than one infiltration BMP proposed, the model shall indicate if and how the mounds will interact. The mounding analysis shall be calculated using the most restrictive soil horizon that will remain in place within the explored aquifer thickness unless alternative analyses are authorized by the Municipal Engineer. The mounding analysis shall be accompanied by a cross section of the infiltration BMP and surrounding topography, and the mound analysis shall extend out to the point(s) at which the mound intersects with the preexisting maximum water table elevation.
[13] 
The applicant shall demonstrate that stormwater infiltration BMPs meet the seventy-two-hour drain time requirement established in Subsection F(2)(a) of this section.
(4) 
Pretreatment measures for infiltration BMPs. By reducing incoming velocities and capturing coarser sediments, pretreatment can extend the functional life and increase the pollutant removal capability of infiltration measures. Therefore, the installation of pretreatment measures is recommended for all development sites. Pretreatment measures may include, but are not limited to, the following:
(a) 
Vegetative filter strips;
(b) 
Bioretention systems. Used in conjunction with a bioretention system, the infiltration basin takes the place of the standard underdrain;
(c) 
Sand filters;
(d) 
Grassed swales; and
(e) 
Detention basins.
(5) 
Collection and conveyance.
(a) 
Bicycle-safe inlet grates. Site development plans that incorporate site design features that help to prevent discharge of trash and debris from drainage systems shall comply with the following standard to control passage of solid and floatable materials through storm drain inlets. For purposes of this paragraph, "solid and floatable materials" means sediment, debris, trash, and other floating, suspended, or settleable solids.
[1] 
Design engineers shall use either of the following grates whenever they use a grate in pavement or another ground surface to collect stormwater from that surface into a storm drain or surface water body under that grate:
[a] 
The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) bicycle-safe grate, which is described in Chapter 2.4 of the NJDOT Bicycle Compatible Roadways and Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines (April 1996); or
[b] 
A different grate, if each individual clear space in that grate has an area of no more than seven square inches or is no greater than 0.5 inch across the smallest dimension. Examples of grates subject to this standard include grates in grate inlets, the grate portion (non-curb-opening portion) of combination inlets, grates on storm sewer manholes, ditch grates, trench grates, and grates of spacer bars in slotted drains. Examples of ground surfaces include surfaces of roads (including bridges), driveways, parking areas, bikeways, plazas, sidewalks, lawns, fields, open channels, and stormwater basin floors.
[2] 
Whenever design engineers use a curb-opening inlet, the clear space in that curb opening (or each individual clear space, if the curb opening has two or more clear spaces) shall have an area of no more than seven square inches or be no greater than two inches across the smallest dimension.
[3] 
This standard does not apply:
[a] 
Where the review agency determines that this standard would cause inadequate hydraulic performance that could not practicably be overcome by using additional or larger storm drain inlets that meet these standards;
[b] 
Where flows from the water quality design storm as specified in Subsection D are conveyed through any device (e.g., end-of-pipe netting facility, manufactured treatment device, or a catch basin hood) that is designed, at a minimum, to prevent delivery of all solid and floatable materials that could not pass through one of the following:
[i] 
A rectangular space 4 5/8 inches long and 1.5 inches wide (this option does not apply for outfall netting facilities); or
[ii] 
A bar screen having a bar spacing of 0.5 inch.
[c] 
Where flows are conveyed through a trash rack that has parallel bars with one-inch spacing between the bars to the elevation of the water quality design storm as specified in Subsection D of this section; or
[d] 
Where the NJDEP determines, pursuant to the New Jersey Register of Historic Places rules at N.J.A.C. 7:4-7.2(c), that action to meet this standard is an undertaking that constitutes an encroachment or will damage or destroy the New Jersey Register listed historic property.
(b) 
Catch basins. Catch basins are storm drain inlets with or without sumps. Catch basins may provide pretreatment for other stormwater BMPs by capturing large sediments. The sediment and pollutant removal efficiency of catch basins depends on the size of the sump and the performance of routine maintenance to retain the available sediment storage space in the sump. Where catch basins with sumps are proposed, the minimum two-foot separation between the bottom of the sump and seasonally high water table shall be provided.
(c) 
Open or perforated conveyance piping. Where adequate separation to the seasonal high water table exists, stormwater from the development site may be conveyed to a stormwater basin via a system of perforated pipes. These pipes may be made of PVC or corrugated metal and are available with perforations of varying size and spacing. Perforated pipe specifications shall be certified by a professional engineer. A professional engineer shall certify that perforated conveyance piping will not act to intercept the seasonal high water table and convey groundwater to the stormwater basin. All open or perforated stormwater conveyance systems shall be installed with a minimum separation of two feet from the seasonal high water table.
I. 
Additional sources for technical guidance.
(1) 
NJDEP technical guidance sources.
(a) 
New Jersey BMP Manual: available from the Division of Watershed Management, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, P.O. Box 418, Trenton, New Jersey 08625 or online at http://www.njstormwater.org.
(b) 
NJDEP Stormwater Management Facilities Maintenance Manual: available from the Division of Watershed Management, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, P.O. Box 418, Trenton, New Jersey 08625 or online at http://njedl.rutgers.edu/ftp/PDFs/1188.pdf.
(2) 
Additional guidance sources.
(a) 
New Jersey Pinelands Commission, P.O. Box 7, 15 Springfield Road, New Lisbon, New Jersey 08064; phone: 609-894-7300; website: http://www.state.nj.us/pinelands.
(b) 
State Soil Conservation Committee Standards for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control in New Jersey: available from all state soil conservation districts, including Ocean County Soil Conservation District, 714 Lacey Road, Forked River, New Jersey 08731; phone: 609-971-7002; fax: 609-267-3347; website: http://ocscd.org.
(c) 
State soil conservation districts.
(d) 
New Jersey Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 600, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0600; phone: 609-530-3536; website: http://www.state.nj.us/transportation.

§ 130-77 General stormwater disposal requirements.

[Amended 9-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-74; 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-76; 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-83; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 2-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-20; 3-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-26; 7-11-1989 by Ord. No. 89-48; 9-5-1989 by Ord. No. 89-56; 11-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-66; 3-6-1990 by Ord. No. 90-21; 3-20-1990 by Ord. No. 90-23; 11-1-1990 by Ord. No. 90-63; 2-19-1991 by Ord. No. 91-13; 11-26-1991 by Ord. No. 91-68; 5-2-1995 by Ord. No. 95-46; 6-13-1995 by Ord. No. 95-54; 10-17-1995 by Ord. No. 95-95; 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101; 6-23-1998 by Ord. No. 98-44]
A. 
The off-site stormwater sewers may not discharge into sanitary sewer systems. The sanitary sewer system may not discharge into the stormwater system.
B. 
Nonpoint source pollution from urban runoff can be minimized by eliminating direct discharge into surface waters. Recharging stormwater to the ground helps maintain groundwater supplies but may have an impact on groundwater quality if not properly treated. The amount of pollutants in the stormwater runoff discharge to surface water bodies shall be minimized, and the impact of the discharge shall satisfy the applicable Department of Environmental Protection established surface water quality standards of the receiving water body, using measures such as sediment traps, oil skimmers and vacuum street cleaners. Pollutants of major concern include petrochemicals and heavy metals from vehicle spillage, deicing salts, aromatic hydrocarbons from blacktop paving, pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers from lawn and garden areas. Separation of stormwater shall be required to allow for direct recharge using dry wells of pollutant-free runoff from places such as rooftops. Runoff contaminated with metals, oils, grease or animal waste should be treated by vegetal filtration prior to recharge.
C. 
If off-site discharge is permitted by the Board, then the volume and quality of stormwater discharged off site shall be controlled so as not to cause any adverse impacts to the receiving water body and must conform to the requirements of the Department of Environmental Protection Stream Encroachment Permit Program and rules. Where practical, stormwater should not be recharged into soils which are classified as excessively or somewhat excessively drained nor into areas identified as deep aquifer recharge areas. The application of road oil, which is sometimes used as a dust control measure, shall be prohibited.
D. 
Coastal development shall avoid discharging of runoff to groundwater on high-permeability moist soils to the maximum extent possible.
E. 
All stormwater management for nonresidential development must be developed in accordance with RSIS as set forth in § 130-74B. However, no applicant for a nonresidential development shall be compelled to exceed a maximum of 60% of the capacity of the stormwater infiltration system as underground infiltration.
F. 
Approval of any swale, holding pond or basin will be contingent upon approval of the Mosquito Commission.
G. 
The construction of any facility utilized to control on-site runoff or drainage should be designed to create a more aesthetic and pleasing environment. To accomplish this, the municipality will require that plants native to the area and soil be used for landscaping to the maximum extent feasible. Special preference will be given to those species of trees and plants which have known pollutant removal abilities. When other ornamental plants are used, they should be of types which are compatible with the natural environment. Terrestrial vegetation stabilizes soil, retards erosion and runoff, promotes infiltration of surface water, reduces the force of wind and adds to aesthetic values for recreation and domestic life. Trees release life-giving oxygen, filter particulate soluble pollutants and provide foods and fuel with no energy input by man.
H. 
A revegetation or landscaping plan is to be submitted with each application site plan utilizing any runoff or drainage control. This plan must include information on the size of the area to be cleared, soil conditions, a description of the existing vegetation and a description of the vegetation which will be planted following clearing of any subsequent development. Season permitting, revegetation shall follow immediately after clearing or development is completed. Soil stabilization is required.
I. 
Surface water runoff shall not be directed in such a way as to increase the volume and rate of discharge into any surface water body or adjoining property from that which existed prior to development of the parcel.
J. 
All development that utilizes wet ponds for stormwater detention/retention purposes shall be required to utilize the water supply in said wet pond for lawn irrigation, if proposed.
[Added 9-17-2002 by Ord. No. 2002-80]

§ 130-77.1 (Reserved) [1]

[1]
Editor's Note: Former § 130-77.1, Stormwater design calculations, added 7-11-1989 by Ord. No. 89-48, as amended 9-5-1989 by Ord. No. 89-56, was repealed 11-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-65.

§ 130-78 Private storm drain inlet retrofitting. [1]

[Added 4-19-2010 by Ord. No. 2010-12]
A. 
Purpose. The purpose of this section is to require the retrofitting of existing storm drain inlets which are in direct contact with repaving, repairing, reconstruction, resurfacing or alterations of facilities on private property, to prevent the discharge of solids and floatables (such as plastic bottles, cans, food wrappers and other litter) to the municipal separate storm sewer system operated by the Township, so as to protect public health, safety and welfare, and to prescribe penalties for the failure to comply.
B. 
Definitions. For the purpose of this section, the following terms, phrases, words, and their derivations shall have the meanings stated herein unless their use in the text of this section clearly demonstrates a different meaning. When not inconsistent with the context, words used in the present tense include the future, words used in the plural number include the singular number, and words used in the singular number include the plural number. The word "shall" is always mandatory and not merely directory.
MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM (MS4)
A conveyance or system of conveyances (including roads with drainage systems, municipal streets, catch basins, curbs, gutters, ditches, man-made channels, or storm drains) that is owned or operated by the Township or other public body and is designed and used for collecting and conveying stormwater.
PERSON
Any individual, corporation, company, partnership, firm, association, or political subdivision of this state subject to municipal jurisdiction.
STORM DRAIN INLET
An opening in a storm drain used to collect stormwater runoff and includes, but is not limited to, a grate inlet, curb-opening inlet, slotted inlet, and combination inlet.
WATERS OF THE STATE
The ocean and its estuaries, all springs, streams and bodies of surface water or groundwater, whether natural or artificial, within the boundaries of the State of New Jersey or subject to its jurisdiction.
C. 
Prohibited conduct. No person in control of private property (except a residential lot with one single-family house) shall authorize the repaving, repairing (excluding the repair of individual potholes), resurfacing (including top coating or chip sealing with asphalt emulsion or a thin base of hot bitumen), reconstructing or altering any surface that is in direct contact with an existing storm drain inlet on that property unless the storm drain inlet either:
(1) 
Already meets the design standard below to control passage of solid and floatable materials; or
(2) 
Is retrofitted or replaced to meet the standards in Subsection D below prior to the completion of the project.
D. 
Design standard. Storm drain inlets identified in Subsection C above shall comply with the following standard to control passage of solid and floatable materials through storm drain inlets. For purposes of this subsection, "solid and floatable materials" means sediment, debris, trash, and other floating, suspended, or settleable solids. For exemptions to this standard, see Subsection D(3) below.
(1) 
Grates.
(a) 
Design engineers shall use either of the following grates whenever they use a grate in pavement or another ground surface to collect stormwater from that surface into a storm drain or surface water body under that grate:
[1] 
The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) bicycle-safe grate, which is described in Chapter 2.4 of the NJDOT Bicycle Compatible Roadways and Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines (April 1996); or
[2] 
A different grate, if each individual clear space in that grate has an area of no more than 7.0 square inches, or is no greater than 0.5 inch across the smallest dimension.
(b) 
Examples of grates subject to this standard include grates in grate inlets, the grate portion (non-curb-opening portion) of combination inlets, grates on storm sewer manholes, ditch grates, trench grates, and grates of spacer bars in slotted drains. Examples of ground surfaces include surfaces of roads (including bridges), driveways, parking areas, bikeways, plazas, sidewalks, lawns, fields, open channels, and stormwater basin floors.
(2) 
Whenever design engineers use a curb-opening inlet, the clear space in that curb opening (or each individual clear space, if the curb opening has two or more clear spaces) shall have an area of no more than 7.0 square inches, or be no greater than 2.0 inches across the smallest dimension.
(3) 
This standard does not apply:
(a) 
When the Municipal Engineer agrees that this standard would cause inadequate hydraulic performance that could not practicably be overcome by using additional or larger storm drain inlets that meet these standards; or
(b) 
When flows are conveyed through any device (e.g., end-of-pipe netting facility, manufactured treatment device, or a catch basin hood) that is designed, at a minimum, to prevent delivery of all solid and floatable materials that could not pass through one of the following:
[1] 
A rectangular space 4 5/8 inches long and 1 1/2 inches wide (this option does not apply for outfall netting facilities); or
[2] 
A bar screen having a bar spacing of 0.5 inch; or
(c) 
Where flows are conveyed through a trash rack that has parallel bars with one-inch spacing between the bars; or
(d) 
Where the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection determines, pursuant to the New Jersey Register of Historic Places Rules at N.J.A.C. 7:4-7.2(c), that action to meet this standard is an undertaking that constitutes an encroachment or will damage or destroy the New Jersey Register listed historic property.
E. 
Enforcement. This section shall be enforced by the Township Police Department and/or other municipal officials of the Township.
F. 
Penalties. Any person(s) who is found to be in violation of the provisions of this section shall be subject to a fine not to exceed $1,000 for each storm drain inlet that is not retrofitted to meet the design standard.
[1]
Editor's Note: Former § 130-78, Stormwater disposal system standards, as amended, was repealed 6-23-1998 by Ord. No. 98-44.

§ 130-79 Stormwater maintenance and repair of system, nonresidential.

[Amended 10-17-1995 by Ord. No. 95-95; 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101; 6-23-1998 by Ord. No. 98-44]
A. 
Responsibility for operation and maintenance of stormwater facilities, including periodic removal and disposal of accumulated particulate material and debris, but not limited to the following: visual inspection of all system components at least twice each year; vacuuming of all storm sewer inlets once every six months (frequency of vacuuming may be adjusted to once a year if first year maintenance records indicate that sediment and debris accumulation is insignificant); reverse flushing and vacuuming if system inspections indicate significant accumulation of sediment in the pipes; and periodic removal and disposal of other material and debris, shall remain with the owner or owners of the property, with permanent arrangements that it shall pass to any successive owner, unless assumed by a governmental agency. If portions of the land are to be sold, legally binding arrangements shall be made to pass the basic responsibility to successors in title. These arrangements shall designate for each project the property owner, governmental agency or other legally established entity to be permanently responsible for maintenance, hereinafter in this section referred to as the "responsible person."
B. 
Prior to granting approval to any project subject to review under this article, the applicant shall enter into an agreement with the municipality to ensure the continued operation and maintenance of the facility. This agreement shall be in a form satisfactory to the Municipal Attorney and may include but may not necessarily be limited to personal guaranties, deed restrictions, covenants and bonds. In cases where property is subdivided and sold separately, a homeowners' association or similar permanent entity should be established as the responsible entity, absent an agreement by a governmental agency to assume responsibility.
C. 
In the event that the facility becomes a danger to public safety or public health, or if it is in need of maintenance, the municipality shall so notify, in writing, the responsible person. From that notice, the responsible person shall have 14 days to effect such maintenance and repair of the facility in a manner that is approved by the Township Engineer or his designee. If the responsible person fails or refuses to perform such maintenance and repair, the municipality may immediately proceed to do so and shall bill the cost thereof to the responsible person.
D. 
In the Pinelands Area, all applicants shall provide a four-year maintenance guaranty for the entire stormwater management system.
E. 
In the Pinelands Area, the agreement required pursuant to § 130-79B above shall include a requirement for annual inspections and shall provide for an inspection and maintenance program of at least 10 years in duration.

§ 130-80 Driveways.

A. 
Traffic circulation. The site plan shall provide a safe and efficient circulation system for the movement of vehicles and pedestrians off the site and on the tract.
B. 
Access driveways.
(1) 
All entrance and exit driveways shall be located so as to afford maximum safety and minimum disruption of traffic on the street.
(2) 
The dimensions of entrance and exit driveways and internal roads shall be adequate to accommodate the volume and character of vehicles anticipated to be using the site. The required dimensions for driveways and interior roads shall be as follows:
[Amended 11-1-1990 by Ord. No. 90-63]
(a) 
Twelve feet minimum for one-way operation.
(b) 
Twenty-four feet minimum for two-way operation.
(c) 
Twenty-eight feet minimum for fire lanes.
(3) 
Driveways serving a development having 50 or fewer parking spaces may use a one-and-one-half-inch-high depressed curb and concrete apron driveway and concrete walk. Those having more than 50 parking spaces, however, shall use curb returns of not less than 15 feet minimum nor 30 feet maximum in radius, except as otherwise directed by the New Jersey Department of Transportation or as necessary to accommodate the large-wheel-base vehicles associated with the safety or operation of the site.
[Amended 8-16-1988 by Ord. No. 88-69; 11-1-1990 by Ord. No. 90-63; 11-5-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-99]
(4) 
Any vertical curve on a driveway shall be flat enough to prevent the dragging of any vehicle undercarriage.
(5) 
Driveway grades shall adhere to the following: 3/4% minimum to 10% maximum. A maximum slope of 2% for the first 20 feet from the street line shall be maintained.
(6) 
Curb cuts to a public street shall not be closer than 25 feet to the point of curvature or point of tangent of the corner radius curb of an intersecting street, or, if required parking spaces exceed 100, then the driveway curb cuts shall not be closer than 100 feet to the point of curvature or point of tangent of the corner radius of the intersecting street.
(7) 
The number of permitted driveways provided from a site shall be related to the type of street and traffic volume thereon and the number and location of other access points therefrom.
(8) 
Driveway pavement shall extend to the paved portion of the street with which it connects and shall be constructed with a minimum of two inches of stabilized base course and 1 1/2 inches of FABC surface course or an approved equal.
(9) 
Driveways are to be curbed on both sides.
(10) 
Within all residential zones within the Township, with exception of the RR Zones, the minimum side yard setback for a driveway shall be:
[Amended 6-14-1994 by Ord. No. 94-51]
(a) 
Five feet where the garage doors front a public street or where the garage is detached from the principal structure; or
(b) 
Three feet where the garage doors do not front a public street (i.e., side load garage).
(11) 
All pavement area shall be constructed with six inches of Type 2, Class A or B, gravel subbase, in addition to bituminous stabilized base course and FABC surface course as specified, or an approved equal.
(12) 
In parking lots having a capacity of more than 100 cars, a main access drive shall be provided from points of ingress and egress. No parking shall be permitted on the main access drive, nor shall it serve as an access aisle to adjacent parking spaces.
(13) 
All access drives shall provide a minimum outside turning radius of 30 feet, unless as a fire lane, in which case they shall provide a minimum outside turning radius of 50 feet.
[Amended 11-1-1990 by Ord. No. 90-63]
(14) 
In R-75 and R-90 Zones, the maximum width of a driveway depression for a two-car capacity driveway shall be 23 feet, in accordance with the provisions of § 187-13. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 14 and 15.[1])
[Added 1-16-1996 by Ord. No. 96-11; amended 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101]
[1]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 14 and 15, are included as attachments to this chapter.
C. 
Access Management Plan consistency. The design and location of all access driveways to Route 72 shall be consistent with the Route 72 Access Management Plan adopted by the Township Council on June 10, 1997, and as may be amended.
[Added 6-10-1997 by Ord. No. 97-47]

§ 130-81 Off-street parking and loading areas.

A. 
Design requirements.
(1) 
The number and size of all parking and loading spaces shall meet the requirements of this section. All residential development shall comply with § 130-81E with regard to the number of parking spaces, parking space size, parking lot access and circulation and aisle widths. All remaining design requirements of residential parking lots, including but not limited to lighting, landscaping, location and setbacks, shall be in compliance with this section and this chapter,
[Amended 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
(2) 
Any off-street loading spaces shall have a minimum height clearance of 15 feet and be designed in accordance with the following criteria:
Loading Space
Apron/Aisle Length
Length
(feet)
Width
(feet)
(90º)
(feet)
(60º)
(feet)
60
10
72
66
60
12
62
57
60
14
60
54
(3) 
Ingress to and egress from a parking or loading area shall be paved and shall include turning areas to assure ease of mobility, ample clearance and the safety of vehicles and pedestrians.
(4) 
Parking areas serving light-duty vehicles shall be constructed with a minimum of two inches of stabilized base course and 1 1/2 inches of FABC surface course, or an approved equal, and shall be sufficiently drained so as to prevent an accumulation of water on the site.
(5) 
All pavement areas shall be constructed with six-inch-thick Type 2, Class A or B, gravel subbase, in addition to the bituminous stabilized base course and FABC surface course as specified.
(6) 
A parking area shall be illuminated if used after sunset, and such illumination shall provide a minimum of five tenths (0.5) lumen per square foot throughout the area and be shielded from adjoining streets or properties. The location of the parking lot light structure shall be in accordance with the requirements of § 130-51G(6).
[Amended 9-18-1990 by Ord. No. 90-53]
(7) 
Off-street parking and loading areas shall be designed to prevent the maneuvering of vehicles into or out of parking or loading spaces within any portion of any street.
(7.1)
The plan shall include both inside curve radius and outside curve radius for all curves on the site. This is to include the entrances to and exits from fire lanes, loading areas, parking aisles and all entrances and exits from the site. The minimum curve radius shall meet the requirements as outlined in the Design Vehicles and Minimum Turning Path Chart. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 10.[1])
[Added 3-7-1989 by Ord. No. 89-25; amended 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101]
[1]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figure 10, is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(8) 
Parking dimensions shall meet the following standards:
(a) 
Each dead-storage bay of an off-street parking space may be perpendicular with the aisle, parallel with the aisle or at any angle between 60º and 90º.
(b) 
No angle parking layout shall be permitted with an angle less than 60º. The following are minimum stall and aisle dimensions:
[Amended 8-21-1990 by Ord. No. 90-46; 11-1-1990 by Ord. No. 90-63; 11-5-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-99]
Type
Aisle Width
(feet)
Stall
Dimensions
(feet)
90-degree parking
24
9 x 18
60-degree parking
18
9 x 18
Parallel parking
  1-way operation
12
7 x 23
  2-way operation
24
7 x 23
(9) 
Parking and loading space stripes shall be four inches wide using white reflective paint. Hatch lines shall be on an angle of 45° and shall consist of stripes four inches wide, two feet on center. The hatch lines shall be white reflective paint, except those hatch lines utilized to separate directions of traffic, which shall be yellow reflective paint.
[Amended 11-5-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-99]
(10) 
All parking and loading areas are to be curbed.
(11) 
No paved area shall be closer to any property line than 15 feet, unless otherwise prohibited herein.
(12) 
The maximum grade permitted in parking areas shall be 6%; the minimum grade permitted in parking areas shall be three-fourths percent (3/4%).
(13) 
Location of parking. Where parking is permitted between the front building line and the street line, a safety island or raised median separating the public street from the parking area shall be provided for intermediate and large parking in accordance with the following minimum requirements:
(a) 
The width of the safety island shall be that width between the proposed street curbline and a point five feet inside the property line. When this width is less than 25 feet, the parking area shall be reduced to provide a minimum width for the safety island of 15 feet. All required tree and shrub plantings shall be planted on the on-site portion of the safety island, with the exception of streetscape plantings as required herein.
[Amended 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10]
(b) 
Safety islands shall be raised a minimum of six inches above the adjacent parking area.
(c) 
Safety islands shall be topsoiled and seeded or otherwise landscaped as required by § 130-51.
[Amended 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10]
(14) 
Small parking areas. Parking lots having 10 or fewer spaces shall comply with all applicable requirements of this chapter and shall also be bordered by a fifteen-foot unbroken, landscaped strip along side property lines from the street line to the rear lot line, unless the Board, for good cause, shall waive such requirements; provided, however, that for parking lots having 10 or fewer spaces, only a two-inch compacted thickness bituminous concrete FABC surface course on six-inch compacted gravel base course will be required.
(15) 
Intermediate-size parking areas. Parking areas having more than 10 spaces but fewer than 101 spaces shall be designed to fulfill the following minimum requirements:
[Amended 2-20-1996 by Ord. No. 96-27]
(a) 
A safety island or raised median shall be provided as herein described.
(b) 
Not more than one two-way access driveway or two one-way access driveways shall be provided on any one street unless approval otherwise is obtained from the body, agency or official having jurisdiction over the plan.
(c) 
Design of the parking area shall include planting islands which shall be a minimum of 10% of the total parking area. These islands shall include planting as required by § 130-51. Parking bays shall be separated from access or circulation drives by a planting island (of ten-foot minimum width) or area for the full width of a bay at the ends of rows.
[Added 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-76; amended 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10]
(16) 
Large parking areas. Parking lots which have a capacity for parking more than 100 vehicles shall incorporate the following minimum design standards:
[Amended 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-76; 1-31-1989 by Ord. No. 89-10; 9-19-1995 by Ord. No. 95-91]
(a) 
No parking stalls which shall require the use of the entrance and exit driveways as access aisles shall be permitted.
(b) 
(Reserved)[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Former Subsection A(16)(b), concerning access driveways located along one-way streets or divided highways, was repealed 11-5-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-99.
(c) 
All directional (one-way) driveways shall be marked by appropriate signs facing all peripheral service roads serving the property as well as the parking area.
(d) 
No driveway shall be located less than 30 feet from the existing drive.
(e) 
The design of the parking area shall include planting islands which shall be a minimum of 10% of the total parking area. These islands shall include planting as required by § 130-51. Parking bays shall be separated from access or circulation drives by a planting island (of ten-foot minimum width) or area for the full width of a bay at the ends of rows. The parking lot shall, where possible, be subdivided into modular parking bays or lots of not greater than 50 spaces each. These modules shall be separated by a landscape island of a minimum ten-foot width. When appropriate, pedestrian walkways shall be provided on these islands. A single line or row within a bay should be no more than 20 spaces in length.
(f) 
The parking area shall contain location markers clearly visible from all areas of the parking lot. Location markers shall be placed, at a minimum, at one marker per 25 parking stalls.
(17) 
Intermediate and large parking areas shall be designed so as to provide for a fire zone adjacent to the building(s). Parking shall not be permitted in a fire zone. Fire zones shall be at least 20 feet in width and may be used for on-site traffic circulation but shall have a turning radius of 50 feet at any entrance and exit of the site. These zones shall be labeled "Fire Zones, No Stopping or Standing."
(18) 
Parking for the handicapped. (See Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 11, 12 and 13[3].)
[Amended 3-7-1989 by Ord. No. 89-25; 2-1-1994 by Ord. No. 94-17; 12-16-1997 by Ord. No. 97-101]
(a) 
Parking spaces for the handicapped shall be located to provide convenient access to building entrances by way of depressed curbs and ramps in accordance with state regulations. All handicapped spaces shall comply with state design standards. The number of spaces to be provided shall be determined by the following table:
Total
Parking in Lot
Required Minimum Number of
Accessible Spaces
1 to 25
1
26 to 50
2
51 to 75
3
76 to 100
4
101 to 150
5
151 to 200
6
201 to 300
7
301 to 400
8
401 to 500
9
501 to 1,000
2% of total
1,001 and over
20, plus 1 for each
100 over 1,000
[1] 
One in every eight accessible spaces, but not less than one, shall be served by an access aisle 96 inches wide minimum and shall be designated "Van-Accessible" as required by Subsection A(18)(e). The vertical clearance at such spaces shall comply with Subsection A(18)(f). All such spaces may be grouped on one level of a parking structure.
[2] 
If passenger loading zones are provided, then at least one passenger loading zone shall comply with Subsection A(18)(g).
[3] 
At facilities providing medical care and other services for persons with mobility impairments, parking spaces complying with Subsection A(18)(b) through (g) shall be provided in accordance with Subsection A(18)(a), except as follows:
[a] 
Outpatient units and facilities: 10% of the total number of parking spaces provided serving each such outpatient unit or facility.
[b] 
Units and facilities that specialize in treatment or services for persons with mobility impairments: 20% of the total number of parking spaces provided serving each such unit or facility.
[4] 
Valet parking. Valet parking facilities shall provide a passenger loading zone complying with Subsection A(18)(g) located on an accessible route to the entrance of the facility. Subsections A(18)(a), (a)[1] and (a)[3] in this section do not apply to valet parking facilities.
(b) 
Minimum number. Parking spaces required to be accessible by Subsection A(18)(a) shall comply with Subsection A(18)(c) through (f). Passenger loading zones required to be accessible by Subsection A(18)(a) shall comply with Subsection A(18)(f) and (g).
(c) 
Location. Accessible parking spaces serving a particular building shall be located on the shortest accessible route of travel from adjacent parking to an accessible entrance. In parking facilities that do not serve a particular building, accessible parking shall be located on the shortest accessible route of travel to an accessible pedestrian entrance of the parking facility. In buildings with multiple accessible entrances with adjacent parking, accessible parking spaces shall be dispersed and located closest to the accessible entrances.
(d) 
Parking spaces. Accessible parking spaces shall be at least eight feet wide. Parking access aisles shall be part of an accessible route to the building or facility entrance and shall comply with accessible route requirements of the Barrier Free Subcode of the New Jersey Uniform Construction Code (UCC). Two accessible parking spaces may share a common aisle (see Figure 11[4]). Parked vehicle overhangs shall not reduce the clear width of an accessible route. Parking spaces and access aisles shall be level with surface slopes not exceeding one to fifty (1:50) [2%] in all directions.
[4]
Editor's Note: Figure 11 is included as an attachment to this chapter.
(e) 
Signage. Accessible parking spaces shall be designated as reserved by a sign showing the symbol of accessibility. Spaces complying with Subsection A(18)(a) shall have an additional sign "Van-Accessible" mounted below the symbol of accessibility. Such signs shall be located so they cannot be obscured by a vehicle parking in the space.
(f) 
Vertical clearance. A minimum vertical clearance of 9.5 feet shall be provided at accessible passenger loading zones and along at least one vehicle access route to such areas from site entrance(s) and exit(s). At parking spaces complying with Subsection A(18)(a), a minimum vertical clearance of 98 inches at the parking space and along at least one vehicle access route to such spaces from site entrance(s) and exit(s) shall be provided.
(g) 
Passenger loading zones. Passenger loading zones shall provide an access aisle at least five feet wide and 20 feet long adjacent and parallel to the vehicle pull-up space (see Figure 11[5]). If there are curbs between the access aisle and the vehicle pull-up space, then a curb ramp complying with the New Jersey UCC shall be provided. Vehicle standing spaces and access aisles shall be level with surface slopes not exceeding one to fifty (1:50) [2%] in all directions.
[5]
Editor's Note: Figure 11 is included as an attachment to this chapter.
[3]
Editor's Note: Engineering Plat Detail, Figures 11 and 12, are included as attachments to this chapter; Figure 13 was repealed 12-6-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-105.
(19) 
Landscaping. Landscaping in parking and loading areas shall be shown on the landscaping plan. Trees shall be staggered and/or spaced so as not to interfere with driver vision and have branches no lower than six feet. All areas between the parking area and the building shall be landscaped.
[Added 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-76]
(20) 
Any parking area constructed of crushed stone or crushed shell material shall provide a concrete apron. The concrete apron shall extend the full width of driveway and extend at least 20 feet behind sidewalk in order to minimize the tracking of material from parking area onto the sidewalk and roadway.
[Added 11-5-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-99]
B. 
Minimum parking requirements shall be as follows:
[Amended 9-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-74; 10-18-1988 by Ord. No. 88-83; 2-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-21; 3-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-28; 4-4-1989 by Ord. No. 89-29; 8-1-1989 by Ord. No. 89-53; 11-1-1990 by Ord. No. 90-62; 1-19-1993 by Ord. No. 93-01; 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51; 7-3-2001 by Ord. No. 2001-52]
(1) 
Automotive repair garage or body shop: four parking spaces per each bay.
(2) 
Automotive sales and service: three parking spaces per bay, plus one parking space for each 400 square feet of gross floor area shall be provided for customer and employee parking. These areas shall be in addition to areas utilized for display and storage of vehicles. Site plans shall specify which parking spaces are designated for customers, employees, display and storage.
(3) 
Automotive service station:
(a) 
Gas only: four parking spaces.
(b) 
Gas and convenience store: four parking spaces, plus two parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.
(c) 
Gas, convenience store and service bays: four parking spaces, plus two parking spaces for each bay, plus two parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.
(d) 
Gas, convenience store and car wash: four parking spaces, plus two parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area, plus six vehicle storage for the car wash.
(4) 
Banks: five parking spaces per 1,000 square feet, plus seven vehicle storage per window for drive up.
(5) 
Bar: 15 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area or 0.5 parking spaces per seat.[6]
[6]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(6) 
Barber- and beauty shop: three parking spaces for each beautician chair or two parking spaces for each barber chair (if known), but not fewer than one parking space per 200 square feet of gross floor area of gross floor area.[7]
[7]
Editor's Note: "An Approach to Determining Parking Demand," Robert J. Boyland and Neil S. Konig.
(7) 
Car washes: four parking spaces, plus off-street vehicle storage (space equal to at least 10 spaces per washing lane). For self-wash or self-service car washes, off-street storage shall be three spaces per washing lane.
(8) 
Church, synagogue temple or mosque: 0.33 parking space per seat.[8]
[8]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(9) 
Long-term care, assisted living and residential health care facilities and continuing care retirement communities.
(a) 
Long term care, assisted living, residential health care facilities: one parking space for each three beds based on its licensed bed capacity.
(b) 
Parking facilities for the residents, employees, visitors of the continuing care requirement community shall be based on the following:
[1] 
Five-tenths parking space per unit per independent living unit.
[2] 
One parking space per five beds for health care beds.
[3] 
One parking space per employee for day shift employees.
[4] 
One tenth space per 10 independent living units for visitors for independent living units.
(9.1)
Convenience store: 6.5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.
[Added 11-1-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-96]
(10) 
Fast-food establishment: one parking space for each 75 square feet of gross floor area.[9] If located within a shopping center, then one parking space for each 100 square feet of gross floor area.[10]
(a) 
With drive-through: 0.3 parking spaces per seat, plus eight vehicle storage per drive-through lane.[11]
[11]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(b) 
Without drive-through: 0.5 parking spaces per seat.[12]
[12]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
[9]
Editor's Note: "Recommended Zoning Ordinance Provisions for Parking," National Parking Association.
[10]
Editor's Note: "Parking Principals," Highway Research Board.
(11) 
Funeral home: five spaces, plus one parking space per 75 square feet of gross floor area of public area.
(12) 
(Reserved)[13]
[13]
Editor's Note: Former Subsection B(12), Furniture or carpet store, was repealed 11-1-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-96.
(13) 
Hospital: three spaces per bed, plus six spaces per 1,000 square feet of outpatient clinic and/or emergency services area, plus four spaces per 1,000 square feet of professional and/or administrative office space.
[Amended 11-1-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-96]
(14) 
Hotel or motel or bed-and-breakfast: one parking space per room, plus 0.33 parking space per employee, plus 0.33 parking space per seat in a banquet/conference room.
(15) 
Industrial uses:
(a) 
Assembly operations: 1.25 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.[14]
[14]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(b) 
Industrial, light: 2.1 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area or 1.5 parking spaces per employee of largest shift.[15]
[15]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(c) 
Manufacturing: 1.5 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area or 0.75 parking space per employee of largest shift.
(d) 
Research lab: 2.5 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area or 1.5 parking space per employee of largest shift.
(e) 
Warehouse/high tech or flex space: one parking space per 5,000 square feet of gross floor area or 1.5 parking space per employee.
(16) 
Library or museum: 3.3 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.[16]
[16]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(17) 
Motor vehicle rental facility: four spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area, plus one space per 2,000 square feet of vehicle storage area, plus adequate storage for rental vehicles.
[Added 11-1-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-96]
(18) 
Office uses:
(a) 
General: four parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.
(b) 
Medical office/surgery center: for facilities less than 5,000 square feet, 10 spaces, plus four spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area. For facilities 5,000 square feet or greater, six spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.
[Amended 11-1-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-96]
(18.1)
Pharmacy: 4.5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area. Pharmacies with a drive-through, 4.5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area, plus storage for three vehicles at the drive-through.
[Added 11-1-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-96]
(19) 
Recreational uses:
(a) 
Bowling alley: six parking spaces per lane.
(b) 
Golf course: eight parking spaces per hole.[17]
[17]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(c) 
Health club: 8.5 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.[18]
[18]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(d) 
Marina: 1.5 parking space per boat slip.
(e) 
Miniature golf: 1.5 parking space per hole.[19]
[19]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(f) 
Pool hall/arcade: four parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.[20]
[20]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(g) 
Skating rink: 4.75 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.[21]
[Amended 12-20-2005 by Ord. No. 2005-109]
[21]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(h) 
Stadium: 0.33 parking space per seat.[22]
[22]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(i) 
Swimming pool: 0.25 parking space per person in pool.[23]
[23]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(j) 
Tennis court: three parking spaces per court.[24]
[24]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(20) 
Restaurant:
(a) 
High turnover: 0.75 parking space per seat.
(b) 
Lower turnover: 0.5 parking space per seat.
(21) 
Retail store, freestanding: four parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross leasable area.[25]
[25]
Editor's Note: "Nonresidential Site Plan Model Ordinance and Commentary," Carol Walker, David Listokin, Howard Schoor, Carolyn Neighbor and Henry Ney, Rutgers, The State University for Urban Policy Research, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs.
(22) 
Schools:
(a) 
Nursery/day care: one space per employee, plus one space per 10 students, plus one dropoff space per 10 students.
(b) 
Elementary: one space per employee, plus one space per five seats in auditorium.
(c) 
High school: one space per employee, plus one space per five students.
(d) 
College: one space per staff, plus 0.75 space per student.
(23) 
Shopping center (includes neighborhood, community, regional and superregional):[26]
(a) 
Less than or equal to 400,000 square feet of gross floor area: four parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross leasable area; adjust upward for theaters and restaurants.
(b) 
Greater than 400,000 square feet of gross floor area; 4.5 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross leasable area.
[26]
Editor's Note: "Parking Requirements for Shopping Centers" Urban Land Institute.
(24) 
Storage, self:
(a) 
Internal: one parking space per employee, plus one parking space per 75 units.
(b) 
External: one parking space available at each unit (access aisle must be kept clear.)
(25) 
Supermarket: six parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area.
(26) 
Theater: 0.4 spaces per seat.
(27) 
Veterinary clinics or hospitals or animal care facilities: one space per 333 square feet of gross floor area.
(28) 
The parking space required for a use not specifically mentioned herein shall be the same as required for a use of similar nature as determined by the Board, based upon that use or enumerated herein which is most similar to the proposed use. If there is no use enumerated herein having sufficient similarity to the proposed use to enable the Board to establish rational parking requirements, the Board may, in its discretion, direct the applicant to furnish the Board with such data as may be necessary to enable the Board to establish rational parking requirements.
(29) 
Off-street parking requirements for residential land uses:[27]
Residential Use
Requirements
Off-Street Parking
(spaces)
Single family
  2 bedroom
1.5
  3 bedroom
2
  4 bedroom
2.5
  5 bedroom
3
Garden apartment
  1 bedroom
1.8
  2 bedroom
2
  3 bedroom
2.1
Townhouse
  1 bedroom
1.8
  2 bedroom
2.3
  3 bedroom
2.4
Mobile home
  1 bedroom
1.8
  2 bedroom
2
[27]
Editor's Note: "Residential Site Improvement Standards" New Jersey Site Improvement Advisory Board.
(30) 
Miscellaneous criteria calculating the amount of parking required. In computing the number of above-required parking spaces, the following rules shall govern:
(a) 
Where fractional space results, the required number shall be construed to be the nearest whole number.
(b) 
Nothing in the above requirements shall be construed to prevent the joint use of off-street parking facilities by two or more uses, provided that the total of such spaces shall not be fewer than the sum of the requirements for various individual uses computed separately by the above requirements.
(c) 
All required parking facilities shall be located on the same lot or parcel as the structure or use they shall serve. In the case of nonresidential uses, parking facilities may be provided on other lots or parcels but shall not be greater than 300 feet from the structure or use they shall serve.
(d) 
Where special traffic problems exist, the Planning Board may require a special survey of conditions, at the applicant's cost, and require the location of entrances and exits in the parking lot to be altered to minimize congestion and hazards.
C. 
Minimum loading requirements. Adequate off-street loading and maneuvering space shall be provided for every retail or wholesale commercial and/or industrial use. The following standards shall be applied:
(1) 
Required number of off-street loading spaces:
(a) 
Schools: one loading space.
(b) 
Hospitals with gross floor area:
[1] 
Under 10,000 square feet: one loading space.
[2] 
From 10,000 to 30,000 square feet of gross floor area: two loading spaces.
(c) 
Funeral homes: one loading space.
(d) 
Office, hotel, retail service, wholesale, warehouse, manufacturing or processing or repairing uses with a gross floor area:
[1] 
Under 10,000 square feet: one loading space required.
[2] 
From 10,000 to 25,000 square feet of gross floor area: two loading spaces.
[3] 
From 25,001 to 60,000 square feet of gross floor area: three loading spaces.
[4] 
From 60,001 to 100,000 square feet of gross floor area: four loading spaces.
(e) 
Off-street loading facilities for separate uses may be provided jointly if the total number of spaces so provided is not less than the sum of the separate requirements for each use, and provided that all regulations governing the location of accessory spaces in relation to the use served are adhered to and that no accessory space or portion thereof shall serve as a required space for more than one use.
(2) 
There shall be a minimum of one trash/refuse enclosure and collection location, separate from any parking or loading area and located in a separate enclosure area. The refuse collection or enclosure area shall be totally enclosed and screened from view in accordance with the requirements in § 130-62C, screening of refuse area. The refuse enclosure area may be located adjacent or within the general loading area(s), provided that containers or enclosures in no way interfere with or restrict loading and unloading.
[Amended 12-20-1988 by Ord. No. 88-95]
(3) 
Where any use is located on a tract of at least 50 acres and no portion of a loading area, including maneuvering areas, is closer than 200 feet to any property line and where the length of the driveway connecting the loading area to the street is at least 300 feet, the number of off-street loading spaces may be less than the number required by the schedule above, provided that the applicant, as part of the site plan, shall document to the approving authority how the number of spaces to be provided will be adequate to meet the needs of the specific use proposed.
(4) 
Access to truck standing, loading and unloading areas may be provided directly from a public street or alley or from any right-of-way that will not interfere with public convenience and will permit orderly and safe movement of truck vehicles.
(5) 
Unless otherwise permitted, fire zones shall not be used as standing, loading or unloading areas.
(6) 
Loading areas, as required under this section, shall be provided in addition to off-street parking spaces and shall not be considered as supplying off-street parking spaces.
(7) 
No off-street loading or unloading area shall be permitted in any required front yard area.
D. 
Location of parking and loading areas.
(1) 
Loading spaces shall be located on the same lot as the use being served, may abut the building being served rather than requiring a setback from the building and shall be located to directly serve the building for which the space is being provided. Loading spaces shall be located at least 20 feet from any building being served. No off-street parking or loading space shall have direct access from a street.
(2) 
No loading and parking spaces shall be located in any required buffer area.
(3) 
No parking shall be permitted in fire lanes, streets, driveways, aisles, sidewalks or turning areas.
(4) 
Off-street loading spaces shall have 15 feet of vertical clearance and be designed in accordance with the following criteria:
Loading Space
Apron/Aisle Length
Length
(feet)
Width
(feet)
(90º)
(feet)
(60º)
(feet)
60
10
72
66
60
12
62
57
60
14
60
54
E. 
Residential parking. Parking requirements for residential development applications shall be in compliance with and parking areas shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Subchapter 4 (Streets and Parking) of N.JA.C 5:21 (Residential Site Improvement Standards), as amended.
[Added 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]

§ 130-82 (Reserved) [1]

[1]
Editor's Note: Former § 130-82, Fences, as amended, was repealed 8-18-1998 by Ord. No. 98-57.

§ 130-83 Groundwater quality protection: best management practices. [1]

[Added 10-15-1996 by Ord. No. 96-56]
The following principals, measures and guidelines shall be utilized, to the maximum extent practicable, to minimize the impact of development and/or activities on the quality of the Township's groundwater resources and to limit the risk of contamination of the Township's potable water supply:
A. 
All commercial and residential development shall minimize impervious coverage and maximize the amount of natural unoccupied open space. In WPO Zones the amount of impervious coverage should be a minimum of 10% less than that permitted by the underlying zoning.
B. 
The preservation of naturally vegetated areas and landscaped areas utilizing native plant material requiring minimal fertilization and pesticide and herbicide application are encouraged.
C. 
Substantial lawn areas requiring fertilization and pesticide and herbicide application are discouraged.
D. 
Storage of hazardous materials shall, except as otherwise regulated by state or federal regulation, allow access for physical inspection and monitoring and shall utilize the best available technology to provide for automatic and immediate alarm or detection of releases.
E. 
Users of hazardous materials shall have a plan to detect and control hazardous material leaks and spills, including but not limited to inspections, notification procedures and emergency containment and cleanup procedure.
[1]
Editor's Note: Former § 130-83, Signs, as amended 8-16-1988 by Ord. No. 88-68, was repealed 11-21-1989 by Ord. No. 89-67.

§ 130-84 Lighting.

A. 
All exterior lighting shall be designed to provide a minimum lighting intensity of five-tenths (0.5) lumen per square foot. Lighting shall be of a soft or glare-free type and shall not cast an illumination color which shall be distractive, obliterate or obscure the view, be ultraviolet, strobic, pulsating, flashing or of any unnatural kind or create a public nuisance, discomfort or hazard.
B. 
All exterior lighting fixtures shall be designed, manufactured, installed and aimed in such manner as to shield glare from reflecting onto adjacent streets, properties, residences or public areas.
C. 
All lighting fixtures shall conform with all applicable requirements of the BOCA Basic Energy Conservation Code and the Lighting Power Budget Determination Procedure, EMS-1, of the Illuminating Engineer's Society.
D. 
All site plans or other development plans proposing the use of exterior lighting, either freestanding or building-mounted, shall include complete data regarding the proposed exterior illumination, including the proposed direction and location of illumination; intensity of illumination, as expressed either in horizontal footcandles or lumens per square foot; the hours of illumination; detail drawings and specifications of lighting fixtures, including but not limited to the type of lighting, fixture details, mounting details, mounting height and lighting isobar patterns; illumination areas as shown on the site plan; and provisions to shield glare from reflecting onto adjacent thoroughfares and properties; and, in addition, any additional specific and special detailed data deemed appropriate for the particular lighting application as required by the Township Engineer, Construction Code Official, Zoning Officer, Planning Board, Environmental Commission, Electrical Subcode Official, Police Department, Zoning Board of Adjustment or other agency.
E. 
The location of the parking lot light structure shall be in accordance with the requirements of § 130-51G(6).
[Added 9-18-1990 by Ord. No. 90-53]

§ 130-84.1 Bikeways.

[Added 6-24-1997 by Ord. No. 97-51]
If required, bikeways shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Subchapter 4 (Streets and Parking) of N.J.A.C. 5:21 (Residential Site Improvement Standards), as amended.

§ 130-84.2 Radio communication airways.

[Added 9-18-2007 by Ord. No. 2007-88]
A. 
Standards. The Township shall designate a Police Radio Communications Officer who shall determine whether the construction or modification of any nonresidential structure may result in interference, interruption, or degradation of the Township's communications system. If it is determined by the Police Radio Communications Officer that said construction or modification of a nonresidential structure results in interference, interruption, or degradation of the Township's communications system, it shall be a condition of site plan approval that the applicant provide the following facilities, services and/or fees:
(1) 
The applicant shall be required to provide sufficient space, up to 1,000 square feet, in the new or modified nonresidential structure to install radio transmitting and receiving equipment as may be necessary to correct all radio system degradation or interference resulting directly or indirectly from the construction or modification.
(2) 
The applicant shall provide power sources, including that provided by an emergency electric power generator, adequate to operate all radio and ancillary equipment installed by the Township in the proposed nonresidential structure or modification to a nonresidential structure. Such power sources shall be secure and free from the possibility of disconnection, to the satisfaction of the Police Radio Communications Officer.
(3) 
The applicant shall provide an antenna mounting space and antenna cable pass, as necessary, to permit the erection of transmitting and receiving antennas in a manner consistent with the radio system's operational and coverage needs.
(4) 
The applicant shall provide free and easy access to the radio equipment, antenna system, and power sources 24 hours per day, seven days per week, by the Township and its authorized officials.
(5) 
The applicant shall provide such space, power and other services and access at applicant's own cost.
(6) 
The Township shall be responsible for the maintenance and cleaning of the interior equipment room areas it uses in accordance with these conditions and requirements. The owner of the structure shall be responsible for the maintenance and access to these areas and all roof areas.
(7) 
The Township shall have the right to install and maintain such security devices as it deems necessary for the protection of its equipment. Such devices shall include, but not be limited to, door locks, intrusion alarms, fire and smoke alarms, sprinkler systems and fire extinguishers. Where appropriate, in the Township's discretion, fire and smoke alarms may be interconnected with other building, fire and smoke alarms to assure maximum protection and safety to those working in or occupying the structure.
(8) 
If the Police Radio Communications Officer determines that the proposed structure or modification to the structure either causes interference or degradation of the Township's radio system and the structure is physically not capable of supporting radio communications equipment, the applicant shall be responsible for the cost of the work required to mitigate and restore necessary and secure communications and radio services. Such costs shall include leasing, purchasing, or otherwise acquiring space in other buildings, erecting radio towers, acquiring building equipment shelters, and any other work deemed necessary by the Police Radio Communications Officer. The applicant shall also pay the cost of radio control wire lines and other circuits leased from the appropriate utility company that are necessary for the control and operation of the radio equipment at the site. The applicant shall be obligated to pay such recurring costs for leased sites and/or equipment for a period of at least 10 years or until such time the Township vacates the premises, whichever event occurs first.
(9) 
The applicant shall provide, install and maintain signal distribution and/or other communications facilities that will assure portable radio coverage throughout the structure and between the inside of the structure and the outside free air. Such facilities shall be at the expense of the applicant when determined by the Township as necessary for the public welfare.
B. 
Escrow fees. The applicant for any preliminary or final site plan application for a nonresidential structure or modification to a nonresidential structure which has been determined by the Police Radio Communications Officer to be a potential cause of interference, interruption, or severe degradation of the Township's Public Safety and Municipal Communication System, shall be required to submit professional service escrow fees at the time of the application submission sufficient to cover the cost of the additional work to determine whether the proposed construction is likely to interfere with the Township's radio communications system. The applicant shall be required to replenish the escrow account on an as-needed basis.