City of Clayton, MO
St. Louis County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.1, 4-27-2004]
The general intent of these standards is to ensure that further redevelopment within the Topton/Brighton neighborhood responds to and is compatible with the established architectural character and scale of the neighborhood, recognizing substantive change in the last ten (10) years.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.2, 4-27-2004]
The Topton-Brighton ("R-4") Urban Design Zoning District is bounded by Maryland Avenue on the north, Topton Way on the west, Forsyth Boulevard on the east and Parkside on the south, limited to those properties zoned "R-4", as depicted below:
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[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.3, 4-27-2004]
The regulations of this Urban Design Zoning District shall supersede or supplement, as applicable, the regulations of the base zoning district. Where conflict results between the regulations of the urban design zoning district and the provisions of the base zoning district, the provisions of the urban design zoning district shall control.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.4, 4-27-2004]
The uses permitted by right and by conditional use permit are listed in the Table of Permitted Uses found in the base zoning district. If a "P" (permitted by right) or a "C" (permitted by conditional use permit) is not indicated for a use in the base zoning district or a use is not included in the base zoning district, it is prohibited.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.5, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The high visibility of the front setback from the street creates a significant impact on a neighborhood's character. The setback and the soft, landscaped buffer it provides between the building and the street is particularly important in Topton-Brighton, where new development is significantly more intense than that traditionally found. Larger buildings have a much stronger presence at the sidewalk edge, creating the perception of a reduced setback with less open space. Paving and other hard materials, in excess, can also detract from this appearance and should be limited to driveway approaches and walkways as traditionally found in the neighborhood. New development should be sensitive to the established neighborhood character and open space provided by front yards and front yard landscaping.
1. 
No more than forty percent (40%) of the front yard setback shall be covered by impervious material.
2. 
Turnarounds or circular drives shall be prohibited within the front setback.
3. 
Shared drives for garage access are encouraged to minimize the width of driveways.
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Shared drives for garage access are encouraged, to minimize the width of driveways.
4. 
Individual driveway approaches shall taper or "neck down" to ten (10) feet at the street edge to the maximum extent feasible.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.6, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The presence of open areas between and among the multi-family homes in Topton-Brighton is a strong character-defining feature of the neighborhood. New development should utilize similar lot coverage as traditionally found along a block to maintain the open character of the street and ensure compatibility with adjacent homes.
B. 
No more than forty percent (40%) of the total lot may be covered by impervious material. Additional lot coverage may be earned through the incentives provided in Section 410.515, Garage Width and Location.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.7, 4-27-2004]
A. 
Building entrances have typically been oriented towards the front yard and the street, accenting the primary facade of the building and creating a uniform line along the street. New structures should be designed to be consistent with the typical organization of the neighborhood.
B. 
The front entrance to a building shall be located on the front facade of the building oriented towards the front yard and street, as found typically in Clayton's residential neighborhoods.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.8, 4-27-2004; Ord. No. 6430 §1, 6-14-2016]
The shady canopy provided by mature trees is an important character-defining feature in many of Clayton's older residential neighborhoods. This is particularly true in the Clayton Gardens and Clayshire where large, evenly spaced trees line the street, buffering homes from traffic and giving the neighborhood a more intimate feeling for pedestrians and residents. Also contributing to this character are the many additional large caliper trees scattered among the homes. As larger homes are introduced, they should be sensitive to this character, preserving trees and vegetation. Specific requirements are set forth in Article XXX: Trees and Landscaping Regulations.
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New street trees shall be installed by the developer at a similar spacing as those already established along the street.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.9, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The wooded, gently rolling topography typical of the St. Louis area contributes to the visual interest and variety of Clayton's residential neighborhoods. Disturbing existing site topography to accommodate larger homes with walk-out basements or below-grade garages can lead to significant drainage problems, particularly for adjacent properties. New homes should minimize site disturbances and should mitigate runoff.
1. 
To the maximum extent feasible, development shall follow and respect the existing topography of the site.
2. 
Extensive grading or unusual site improvements (e.g., retaining walls greater than four (4) foot in height) shall not be permitted, unless deemed compatible with the neighborhood and approved by the Plan Commission.
3. 
Site drainage patterns shall be designed to prevent concentrated surface drainage from collecting on and flowing across adjacent lots, pedestrian paths, walks and sidewalks. Stormwater drainage shall be connected to a storm sewer where available as determined by the City.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.10, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The consistent appearance of a broad, landscaped front setback and uniform building edge creates a sense of visual continuity along the street and creates an open appearance characteristic of the neighborhood. As redevelopment occurs, the open character of the front setback should be preserved.
1. 
Front setbacks shall not be less than the average of those found along the block face.
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Front setbacks shall not be less than the average of those found along the block face.
2. 
Prohibit designated outdoor parking spaces within the front or side setback.
3. 
Porches, terraces and balconies shall not be permitted on the front facade.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.11, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The garage has not traditionally been a dominant feature in Topton-Brighton, as parking or garages were typically located to the rear of the structure. This configuration allowed the architectural details of the homes and front yard to define the character of the street. Below-grade front garages have been introduced in Topton-Brighton as the size of homes has increased and lot configurations become more complex. The appearance of these garages and their associated driveways have virtually replaced the yard in some cases and dominate the street, completely changing its character. This garage condition should be strongly discouraged and future garage placement and scale should be carefully considered to minimize additional visual impacts upon the street and surrounding neighborhood.
1. 
At-grade, side or rear accessed garages are the preferred condition and are strongly encouraged. The following incentives shall apply:
a. 
An at-grade, side-loading garage condition shall warrant up to an additional ten percent (10%) lot area coverage.
b. 
An at-grade, rear-loading garage condition shall warrant up to an additional fifteen percent (15%) lot area coverage.
2. 
Front-loading below-grade garages are strongly discouraged.
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Front-loading below-grade garages are strongly discouraged.
The following incentives shall apply:
a. 
A side-loading below-grade garage condition shall warrant an additional five percent (5%) lot area coverage.
b. 
A rear-loading below-grade garage condition shall warrant an additional ten percent (10%) lot area coverage.
3. 
The following restrictions shall apply to below-grade, front-loading garages:
a. 
The applicant shall demonstrate that all potential alternative garage locations have been ruled out.
b. 
Front-loading garages shall not exceed twenty-four (24) feet in width or fifty percent (50%) of the total length of the home's front facade, whichever is less.
c. 
Front-loading garages along the street edge shall utilize landscaping and strategic tree plantings to break up paved areas.
4. 
For larger, multi-unit structures, shared driveway access to a parking garage serving a single building is strongly encouraged. The following incentives shall apply:
a. 
A parking garage serving multiple units in a single building with a shared driveway access shall warrant up to an additional ten percent (10%) lot area coverage.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.12, 4-27-2004]
A. 
Topton-Brighton, as with many Clayton neighborhoods, has traditionally been dominated by the use of masonry building materials. Standard size brick in earth tones is the primary material found. Accent materials on original structures range from painted trim, lap siding, shutters and stone veneer in a few cases. Redevelopment projects, although much more elaborate in design, have integrated this established theme by utilizing a similar palette of materials to create a unified appearance. The intent of these standards is to allow for flexibility and creativity in design, while retaining the traditional brick character of the neighborhood.
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Typical palette of materials and architectural detailing.
1. 
Primary building materials shall be limited to brick with a limit of one (1) wall surface accent material not to exceed twenty-five percent (25%) of any wall elevation. Brick may be painted when compatible with the existing neighborhood.
2. 
The following materials shall be permitted as accent materials, not to exceed twenty-five percent (25%) of the total wall area:
a. 
Stucco,
b. 
Stone, or
c. 
Wood lap siding.
3. 
The following materials are prohibited:
a. 
EIFS,
b. 
"Jumbo" brick,
c. 
Split-faced block, or
d. 
Vinyl siding.
4. 
Muted, earth-toned colors shall be used on below-grade garage doors to help reduce their visual prominence from the street.
5. 
Retaining walls shall be constructed of materials similar in color, texture and scale as those used on the primary structure.
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Retaining walls shall be constructed of materials similar in color, texture and scale as those used on the primary structure.
The following materials shall not be used for any retaining walls visible from the street or from the ground level of any adjoining residence:
a. 
Wood ties,
b. 
Versa-lok,
c. 
Keystone,
d. 
Windsor, or
e. 
Similar modular block wall systems.
f. 
Asphalt shall not be used for driveways or driveway aprons. These features shall be constructed of one (1) of the following materials:
g. 
Exposed aggregate;
h. 
Brick pavers; or
i. 
Stamped concrete.
6. 
Metal shall not be used as a primary roof material.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.13, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The two-story apartment homes originally found in Topton-Brighton are fairly modest in scale and boxy in form. Though most are oriented towards the street, several are clustered in groups oriented towards a central yard. Many of these structures are being replaced with larger town home style units in groups of two (2), three (3) or four (4). These homes are typically taller, with a strong vertical emphasis. Also becoming more prevalent are larger, blocky multi-family buildings, often on combined lots. The height and massing of these structures should be designed to be compatible with the variety of established forms found in the neighborhood.
1. 
Building height shall not exceed three (3) stories or forty-five (45) feet above the average existing grade, whichever is less. Partial stories with dormers or sheds shall be permitted under sloping roofs. Partial stories shall be completely contained beneath the slope of the roof line.
410-525A1.tif
Building height shall not exceed 3 stories or 45 feet above the average existing grade, whichever is less.
2. 
Building facades (with street frontage) fifty (50) feet or greater in length shall incorporate wall offsets, a minimum of three (3) feet in depth, a minimum of every thirty-five (35) feet.
410-455A6.tif
Buildings 50 feet or greater in length shall incorporate wall offsets, a minimum of 3 feet in depth, a minimum of every 35 feet.
3. 
To further break up large wall expanses or to differentiate individual units, the following variations shall be provided: variations in roof line, structural delineation, window placement or exterior trim.
4. 
Replication of the facades of more than four (4) attached town home units in any single row shall be prohibited.
5. 
Exposed concrete foundation shall not be permitted where visible from the street.
[Ord. No. 5814 §9a.14, 4-27-2004]
A. 
Architectural detailing on structures within Topton-Brighton range from dormer windows, pitched roof lines and raised entrances to stone accents and shuttered windows. New structures should use detailing to visually "break-up" large walls and create interest at the street.
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Characteristic architectural detailing, with dormers, pitched rooflines and raised entrances.
1. 
Flat, mansard or exotic roof forms not characteristic of the neighborhood shall be prohibited.
2. 
New structures shall use architectural detailing that is compatible with the established architectural style of the neighborhood to visually "break-up" large walls.
3. 
Exposed concrete foundation shall not be permitted where visible from the street.
4. 
Columns shall be compatible with the predominant architectural style of the neighborhood. Size, materials and proportions of the columns to the structure shall be provided on submitted plans.