City of Clayton, MO
St. Louis County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.1, 4-27-2004]
The general intent of these standards is to ensure that renovation and redevelopment responds to and protects the established character of the Westwood Corridor. Renovation standards shall apply only to structures constructed prior to 1940.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.2, 4-27-2004]
The Westwood Corridor ("R-6") Urban Design Zoning District is bounded by Wydown Boulevard on the north and Clayton Road on the south, limited to those properties zoned "R-6", as depicted below:
410-540.tif
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.3, 4-27-2004]
The regulations of this urban design zoning district shall supersede or supplement, as applicable, the regulations of the base zoning district. Where conflict results between the regulations of the urban design zoning district and the provisions of the base zoning district, the provisions of the urban design zoning district shall control.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.4, 4-27-2004]
The uses permitted by right and by conditional use permit are listed in the Table of Permitted Uses found in the base zoning district. If a "P" (permitted by right) or a "C" (permitted by conditional use permit) is not indicated for a use in the base zoning district or a use is not included in the base zoning district, it is prohibited.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.5, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The high visibility of the front setback from the street creates a significant impact on a neighborhood's character. In the Westwood Corridor, the setback and open courtyards provided by the many U-shaped buildings provides a soft, landscaped buffer between the building and the street. New structures and renovations should generally reflect the configuration of the structure being removed to maintain the established character of the street.
B. 
New Construction—Design Standards.
1. 
A new structure replacing a U-shaped or other courtyard-oriented structure shall be designed in a similar configuration to maintain an open appearance at the street.
410-555.tif
When replacing a courtyard-oriented structure, a new structure should be designed in a similar configuration to maintain an open character at the street.
2. 
Underground parking structures shall be accessed by a single drive, as typically found in the corridor, to the maximum extent feasible.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.6, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The Westwood Corridor is home to a variety of lot sizes and configurations. Many of the lots offer limited opportunities for flexibility in coverage due to their smaller size and proximity to adjacent homes. However, a small number of lots along the southwest side of Westwood are significantly deeper and wider, creating the potential for additional coverage towards the rear of the lot without creating negative visual impacts.
B. 
No more than fifty percent (50%) of the total lot shall be covered by impervious material. Structures providing a front courtyard or increased front yard setback, as specified in Section 410.585 Rear Yard Setbacks, shall not be bound to a maximum total lot coverage, provided that required front and side yard setbacks are met.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.7, 4-27-2004]
A. 
Building entrances in the corridor have typically been oriented towards the front yard or courtyard and the street, accenting the primary facade of the building. Although the physical layout of the structures vary from a "U" shaped design opening to a courtyard, to a more uniform, rectangular shape, the repetition of the entries help form a uniform line along the street. New structures should be designed to be consistent with the typical organization of the neighborhood.
410-565.tif
Main entrances should be oriented towards the street, as typically found in the Corridor.
B. 
The front entrance to a building shall be located on the front facade of the building oriented towards the front yard or courtyard and street, as found typically in the corridor.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.8, 4-27-2004; Ord. No. 6430 §1, 6-14-2016]
The shady canopy provided by mature trees is an important character-defining feature in many of Clayton's older residential neighborhoods. This is particularly true in the Clayton Gardens and Clayshire where large, evenly spaced trees line the street, buffering homes from traffic and giving the neighborhood a more intimate feeling for pedestrians and residents. Also contributing to this character are the many additional large caliper trees scattered among the homes. As larger homes are introduced, they should be sensitive to this character, preserving trees and vegetation. Specific requirements are set forth in Article XXX: Trees and Landscaping Regulations.
410-570.tif
Along Westwood, evenly spaced trees line the street, buffering the sidewalk from traffic and enhancing the neighborhood character.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.9, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The wooded, gently rolling topography typical of the St. Louis area contributes to the visual interest and variety of Clayton's residential neighborhoods. Disturbing existing site topography to accommodate larger homes with walk-out basements or below-grade garages can lead to significant drainage problems, particularly for adjacent properties. New homes should minimize site disturbances and should mitigate runoff.
1. 
To the maximum extent feasible, development shall follow and respect the existing topography of the site.
2. 
Extensive grading or unusual site improvements (e.g., retaining walls greater than four (4) feet in height) shall not be permitted, unless deemed compatible with the neighborhood and approved by the Plan Commission.
3. 
Site drainage patterns shall be designed to prevent concentrated surface drainage from collecting on and flowing across adjacent lots, pedestrian paths, walks and sidewalks. Stormwater drainage shall be connected to a storm sewer where available as determined by the City.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.10, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The consistent appearance of a broad, landscaped front setback and uniform building edge creates a sense of visual continuity along the street and creates an open appearance characteristic of the neighborhood. As redevelopment occurs, the open character of the front setback should be preserved.
B. 
The front yard setback shall not be less than the average of those found along a block face.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.11, 4-27-2004]
A. 
The deep lot configurations found in the southwest area of the corridor provide an opportunity for new development to utilize the rear yard setback to acquire additional buildable area and density without negatively impacting adjacent development. Actual appropriate setbacks will vary slightly in order to accommodate services, such as trash receptacles, and will be evaluated during the site plan review process.
B. 
The minimum rear yard setback shall be fifteen (15) feet from the rear property line to the closest rear wall of the principal structure. The following incentives shall apply:
1. 
Structures designed in a U-shaped form that provide a front courtyard space open to and visible from the street shall not be required to have a minimum rear yard setback. The total area of a front courtyard shall not be less than twenty percent (20%) of the total building living area.
2. 
Structures shall be permitted to increase their allowable front yard setback by fifteen (15) feet in lieu of providing a rear setback.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.12, 4-27-2004]
A. 
One (1) of the many appealing features of the Westwood Corridor is its thoughtful treatment of off-street parking. Most of the structures provide underground, off-street parking that is visually and functionally integrated with the structure. As a result, broad lawns and shade trees border most buildings rather than the unsightly, exposed parking lots typically found with many more modern multi-family developments. New development should provide off-street parking that is compatible with the established character of the neighborhood.
410-590.tif
1. 
Off-street parking shall be accommodated below ground and be structurally and visually integrated as part of the primary structure through the use of similar materials and architectural detailing.
410-590A1.tif
Off-street parking shall be accommodated below ground and be structurally and visually integrated as part of the primary structure.
2. 
As specified in Section 410.555 parking structures shall be accessed by a single drive, as typically found in the corridor, to the maximum extent feasible.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.13, 4-27-2004]
A. 
As with many Clayton neighborhoods, the Westwood Corridor has traditionally been dominated by the use of masonry building materials. Standard size brick in predominantly red tones is the primary material found. Accent materials are more varied, with a several varieties of stone found on many structures at the foundation or around windows and doors. Stucco is present as an accent material, but is currently limited to few English Tudor style structures. Care should be taken to preserve original building materials and to ensure that new or replacement materials are of a similar appearance and character as those traditionally found within the corridor.
410-595.tif
This Tudor structure represents the range of accent materials used to enhance the simple design of many Corridor structures.
B. 
New Construction—Design Standards.
1. 
Appropriate primary materials shall be limited to masonry materials, such as brick or a combination of brick and stone, as traditionally found within the corridor. Brick may be painted when compatible with the existing neighborhood.
2. 
Stucco shall be permitted as an accent material not to exceed twenty-five percent (25%) of any wall elevation.
3. 
Retaining walls shall be constructed from masonry materials similar to those used on the primary structure.
4. 
Visible roof materials shall be of a similar scale and texture to those traditionally used.
5. 
Asphalt shall not be used for driveways or driveway aprons. These features shall be constructed of one (1) of the following materials:
a. 
Exposed aggregate;
b. 
Brick pavers; or
c. 
Stamped concrete.
6. 
Metal shall not be used as a primary roof material.
C. 
Renovation—Design Standards.
1. 
Character defining features, such as stone retaining walls, steps and foundations, shall be preserved to the maximum extent feasible.
2. 
Enclosure of or other significant alterations to decks or balconies that were not originally enclosed shall be prohibited.
3. 
Original masonry building materials shall not be altered or otherwise covered with new building materials, such as stucco or vinyl siding, or painted.
4. 
Replacement materials on visible roof surfaces shall be of a similar scale and texture as those traditionally used, such as tile or slate.
410-595C.tif
Typical architectural detailing in the Corridor.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.14, 4-27-2004]
A. 
Building heights in the corridor are currently fairly uniform, ranging from two (2) to three and one-half (3½) stories tall with fairly blocky rectangular or "U" shaped configurations oriented towards the street or a center lawn or courtyard. Surrounding development ranges from blocky, mid-rise development along Hanley to a range of two- to three-story single- and multi-family dwellings in the Mooreland's neighborhood to the east. The height and mass of new development should respond to both surrounding development and adjacent development within the corridor. Subtle articulation of the wall surface with design elements such as a soldier course, stone lintels or sills or brick row-lock are common details in the neighborhood.
1. 
Building height shall not exceed three (3) stories or forty-five (45) feet above the average existing grade of the site. Exceptions to the maximum height shall be permitted on lots west of Westwood Drive and south of Buckingham, building heights shall not exceed three (3) stories or forty-five (45) feet above the average grade of the site within twenty (20) feet of the front setback. Beyond twenty (20) feet from the setback, building heights may "step-up" to a maximum of five (5) stories or sixty-five (65) feet.
410-600.tif
South of Buckingham, building heights may "step-up" from 3 stories or 45 feet to a maximum of 5 stories or 65 feet beyond 20 feet from the front setback.
2. 
Articulation of the wall surface shall be required. This may be accomplished by a change in the brick pattern or the addition of stone detailing.
[Ord. No. 5814 §10a.15, 4-27-2004]
A. 
Though fairly simple in their overall form, generally rectangular or "U" shaped with gently pitched roof lines or pediment walls, the structures found in the Westwood Corridor have many subtle architectural details that add to their character. A wide variety of decorative windows add visual interest. They range from groupings of multi-paned windows or double-hung windows to some more ornate accent windows, such as leaded or stained glass. Stone sills, headers or casings further enhance many of the windows. Also significant are the many well-defined entryways. Typically above the grade of the sidewalk, many have elegant curving staircases, ornamental railing or stone retaining walls leading to the entrance. In order to protect the rich character of the corridor, care should be taken to preserve traditional architectural detailing during significant renovation projects and ensure that infill development utilizes window, roof line and entryway design and placement that complements this established character.
410-605A.tif
A sampling of the Corridor's rich architectural detailing.
B. 
New Construction—Design Standards.
1. 
Windows shall be of a similar size, shape and architectural character to those traditionally found in the corridor.
2. 
Roof forms and treatments shall be similar to those found on existing structures in the corridor. Flat roof lines shall be concealed by a parapet wall or other decorative feature as found in the corridor.
3. 
New structures shall have a solid-to-void (wall-to-window) ratio similar to that found on original structures in the corridor.
410-605B.tif
C. 
Renovation—Design Standards.
1. 
The character, proportion, size and general appearance of original windows shall be preserved during renovation.
a. 
Original window openings shall not be enclosed, enlarged or otherwise modified.
2. 
Replacement windows shall have a similar appearance as the original window's design.
410-605C.tif
Replacement windows shall have a similar appearance as the original window's design.
a. 
Replacement windows shall be of the same material as the original to the maximum extent feasible. Alternatively, substitute materials shall be considered if the dimension, profile and finish closely match the original.
b. 
Snap-in muntins shall be used to create similar light and shadow patterns, if direct replacement of true divided light windows is not feasible.