City of Blue Springs, MO
Jackson County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Note: All illustrations in this Chapter are for an illustrative purpose only and are not intended to reflect an actual Code requirement. Illustrations may be added and/or changed from time to time by notice to the Planning Commission and posting on the City's website.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.010; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Intent. It is the intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Emphasize the importance of site access from a variety of modes of transportation wherever appropriate.
2. 
Provide the optimal amount of vehicle parking for individual sites, recognizing that both too little parking and too much parking create negative impacts.
3. 
Ensure the appropriate site location and design features that mitigate the impact of parking on the public realm and urban design goals for a district or adjacent sites.
4. 
Reduce or minimize runoff from surface parking.
5. 
Promote efficient site design and avoid the need to dedicate areas of individual and adjacent sites to underutilized or redundant vehicle parking.
B. 
Applicability. The standards of this Section shall apply to:
1. 
All new site plans or development applications.
2. 
Any change of use or expansion of an existing use, except that the application shall only be responsible for the additional parking required for that use, and any existing deficiencies may be credited at the directors discretion.
3. 
The location, design and screening standards shall apply to all new parking areas, and to renovations and expansions of existing parking to the extent practical. Except when more than twenty-five percent (25%) of the parking capacity or more than fifty percent (50%) of the area is being altered, full compliance shall be required.
4. 
For infill and rehabilitation projects, the Community Development Director may waive the applicability of this Section where these standards would result in less than ten percent (10%) additional parking requirements.
C. 
Required Parking.
1. 
Minimum Vehicle Parking. Off-street vehicle parking spaces shall be provided in accordance with Schedule A, B, and C.
[Ord. No. 4795, 2-19-2019]
Schedule A: Off-Street Parking
Use Type
Required Space
Residential Uses
Assisted living
1 per dwelling unit
Duplex
2 per dwelling unit
Group home
1 per employee, plus 1 per 4 residents
Group residential
1 per 2 residents
Manufactured housing unit
2 per dwelling unit
Mobile home
2 per dwelling unit
Multi-family
1 per efficiency unit, 1.5 per 1-bedroom unit, and 2 per two- or more bedroom units
Single-family, attached
2 per dwelling unit
Single-family detached
2 per dwelling unit
Public, Quasi-Public And Commercial Uses
Adult entertainment establishment
1 per 75 square feet
Airport or airstrip
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Animal care, general
1 per 400 square feet
Animal care, limited
1 per 300 square feet
Auditorium or stadium
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Bank or financial institution
1 per 200 square feet, plus stacking spaces per Section 407.010(F)
Bar or tavern
1 per 75 square feet
Car wash
Stacking spaces per Section 407.010(F)
Cemetery
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Club, private
1 per 4 persons capacity
College or university
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Construction sales and service
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Convalescent care
1 per 4 beds patient capacity, plus 1 per 2 employees
Correctional facility
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Cultural service
1 per 500 square feet
Day care (limited, general, commercial)
1 per employee, plus 1 per 10 pupils
Funeral home
1 per 4-person capacity
Golf course
4 per hole, plus spaces required for restaurant and bar area
Government service
1 per 300 square feet
Health club
1 per 200 square feet
Heliport or helipad
None
Hospital
1 per 4 beds patient capacity, plus 1 per 2 employees
Hotel or motel
1 per guest room, plus 1 per 10 guest rooms, plus required spaces for restaurant, assembly and other uses within hotel/motel
Library
1 per 500 square feet
Marina
1 per boat slip
Medical service
1 per 200 square feet
Military service
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Mobile home sales
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Office, general
1 per 300 square feet, but in no case shall parking be provided at greater than 1 space per 200 square feet
Parks and recreation
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Post office
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Recreation and entertainment, indoor
1 per 3 seats (theaters) 1 per 400 square feet (other)
Recreation and entertainment, outdoor
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Recreational vehicle park
1 per camping space
Religious assembly
1 per 4 seats
Repair service
1 per 400 square feet
Research service
1 per 300 square feet
Restaurant, fast-food
1 per 75 square feet of customer service or dining area; 1 per 200 square feet if no customer service or dining area, plus stacking spaces per Section 407.010(F)
Restaurant, general
1 per 150 square feet for first 2,500 square feet, plus 1 per 100 square feet over 2,500 square feet
Retail sales and service
1 - 2,000 square feet = 1 per 400 square feet
2,001 - 25,000 square feet = 1 per 200 square feet
25,001 - 400,000 square feet = 1 per 250 square feet
400,001 - 600,000 square feet = 1 per 225 square feet
600,001 + square feet = 1 per 200 square feet
In no case shall parking for a retail development be provided so that more than 1 space per 200 square feet is exceeded
Safety service
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
School, elementary, middle or high
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Service station
1 per service bay, plus 0.5 per pump
Service station with mini-mart
0.5 per pump plus 1 space per 300 square feet of retail floor area
Shooting range
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Studio, television or film
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Vehicle and equipment sales
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Vehicle/equipment storage yard
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Vehicle repair, general and limited
2 spaces per service bay; service bay is not a parking place, plus 1 space for each employee on the work shift containing the maximum number of employees
Vocational school
1 per 3 students, plus 0.5 per faculty member
Warehouse, residential storage
1 per 5 storage bays or 1 per 1,000 square feet, whichever produces less spaces
Manufacturing, Industrial And Extractive Uses
Asphalt or concrete plant
1 per employee
Basic industry
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Compost facility
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Food/bakery product manufacturing
1 per 1,000 square feet or 1 per employee, whichever results in more spaces
Freight terminal
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Gas and fuel sales
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Gas and fuel storage
1 per employee
Hazardous operation
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Landfill
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Laundry service
1 per 1,000 square feet or 1 per employee, whichever results in more spaces
Manufacturing and assembly
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Mining or quarrying
1 per employee
Oil or gas drilling
1 per employee
Oil refining
1 per employee
Printing and publishing
1 per 1,000 square feet or 1 per employee, whichever results in more spaces
Recycling processing center
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Salvage yard
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Solid waste collection/processing
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Stockyard
1 per employee
Transit facility
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule C
Utility, major
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Utility, minor
None
Warehousing and wholesale
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Welding or machine shop
1 per 1,000 square feet or 1 per employee, whichever results in more spaces
Agricultural Uses
Agricultural processing
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Agricultural sales and service
Spaces to be provided pursuant to Schedule B
Agriculture, general
None
Agriculture, limited
None
Schedule B: Off-Street Parking
Activity
Required Spaces
Office or administrative area
1 per 300 square feet, but in no case greater than 1 space per 200 square feet
Indoor sales, service or display area
1 per 500 square feet, but in no case greater than 1 space per 400 square feet
Outdoor sales, service or display area (3,000 square feet in area or less)
1 per 750 square feet, but in no case greater than 1 space per 500 square feet
Outdoor sales, service or display area (over 3,000 square feet in area)
1 space per 1,000 square feet but in no case greater than 1 space per 750 square feet
Motor vehicles and heavy equipment sales/storage
1 per 2,000 square feet
Other sales/service/display
1 per 1,000 square feet
Indoor storage, warehousing, equipment servicing or manufacturing area
No to exceed 1 space per 1,000 square feet
Schedule C: Off-Street Parking
Schedule C uses have widely varying parking demand characteristics, making it impossible to specify a single off-street parking standard. A developer proposing to develop or expand a Schedule C use shall submit a parking study that provides justification for the number of off-street parking spaces proposed. The Director of Community Development shall review this study and any other traffic engineering and planning data that are relevant to the establishment of an appropriate off-street parking standard for the proposed use. A parking study shall include estimates of parking demand based on recommendations of the Institute of Traffic Engineers (ITE) and data collected from uses or combinations of uses that are the same or comparable to the proposed use. Comparability shall be determined by density, scale, bulk, area, type of activity, and location. The study shall document the source of data used to develop the recommendations. After reviewing the parking study, the Director of Community Development shall establish a minimum off-street parking standard for the proposed use.
The Director of Community Development and/or Planning Commission may allow for a Schedule A or Schedule B use to utilize the Schedule C parking study process to determine the minimum number of parking spaces to be provided for a particular use or development in instances where it is deemed necessary or beneficial to tailor the parking to the particular needs of the use or development based upon unique operational characteristics not normally considered under Schedule A or B requirements.
2. 
Computing Off-Street Parking And Loading Requirements.
a. 
Multiple Uses. Lots containing more than one (1) use shall provide parking and loading in an amount equal to the total of the requirements for all uses, except that the shared parking matrix in Section 407.010(D)(7) shall be used to convert the maximum parking limits.
b. 
Fractions. When the required spaces result in fractions, any fraction of one-half (1/2) or less shall be disregarded and any fraction of more than one-half (1/2) shall be rounded upward to the next highest whole number.
c. 
Area. All square footage-based parking and loading standards shall be computed on the basis of gross floor area, except where the parking schedules note otherwise.
d. 
Employees, Students And Occupant-Based Standards. Parking requirements based on the number of employees, students, residents or occupants, calculations shall be based on the largest number of persons working on any single shift, the maximum enrollment or the maximum fire-rated capacity, whichever is applicable and whichever results in the greater number of spaces.
e. 
Unlisted Uses. Uses not specifically listed in an off-street parking schedule shall use the required parking for the listed use deemed by the Director of Community Development to be most similar to the use proposed or require a parking study in accordance with Schedule C.
f. 
Off-Street Parking For Persons With Disabilities. Off-street parking facilities shall be designed and constructed in accordance with all requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act[1] and the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards.
[1]
Editor's Note: See 42 U.S.C. § 12101 et seq.
3. 
Maximum Parking. No site shall provide more than twenty-five percent (25%) above the parking required by this Section. No site shall provide more than ten percent (10%) above the parking required by this Section without providing one (1) or more of the following mitigating design elements:
a. 
Additional open space of at least fifty percent (50%) of the excess area of parking, and designed to the standards of open space types in Section 406.030 or frontage types in Section 407.030, and located in a way to minimize the impact of parking on streetscapes and adjacent sites.
b. 
Design the excess space for dual purposes, as gathering space or other pedestrian-scale, landscape or urban design purposes generally, but accommodate limited or overflow parking at other times.
c. 
The surface of lesser used or overflow parking shall be designed as porous surface that allows stormwater to be infiltrated. Any porous surface shall demonstrate that it has the same or better performance standards than standard parking surfaces and be approved by the Director of Public Works who may require enhanced stormwater performance for the entire parking area. Porous surfaces should be designed according to the Mid America Regional Council and American Public Works Association Manual of Best Management Practices for Stormwater quality. A plan for routine and long term maintenance shall also be submitted to ensure the continued performance of the porous system.
d. 
The landscape material required by this Section shall be increased by fifteen percent (15%) and located in a way to minimize the impact of parking on streetscapes and adjacent sites.
4. 
Bicycle Parking. All non-residential or multi-family uses within one thousand (1,000) feet of a designated bicycle route shall provide the following bicycle parking spaces.
[Ord. No. 4585 § 7, 2-16-2016]
Table 407.010-1: Bicycle Parking
Activity
Required Spaces
Primary or secondary school
20% of the number of students and 3% of number of employees
Retail or office uses
10% of the required vehicle spaces up to 200 vehicle parking spaces
Minimum of 20 bicycle parking spaces for any use having 200 or more vehicle parking spaces
Other institutional or entertainment uses
5% of the required vehicle spaces
Industrial uses
3% of the number of employees
Residential
1 per dwelling unit
5. 
Use Of Parking Area. Required parking areas shall be used solely for the parking of vehicles and shall not be used for the storage of vehicles, boats, motor homes, campers, mobile homes, inoperable vehicles or materials. Temporary uses, special events, and other seasonal site and building uses enabled by other Sections of this Code may allow alternative utilization of parking areas based on the standards and criteria of those Sections. Off-street or on-street parking of vehicles weighing more than six (6) tons or containing more than two (2) axles shall be prohibited in MF-18 and less intensive districts. This provision shall not prohibit temporary parking of vehicles making pickups or deliveries.
D. 
Parking Reductions. The parking required by Subsection(C) may be reduced depending on context, and according to the following strategies:
1. 
On-Street Parking Credit. All on-street parking within three hundred (300) feet of any lot frontage shall count towards the parking requirement at a rate of one (1) space for every two (2) on-street spaces.
2. 
Bicycle Parking Credit. All on-site bicycle parking designed and located according to the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Bicycle Parking Guidelines may reduce the required vehicle parking at a rate of one (1) space for every four (4) bicycle parking spaces up to a maximum of twenty percent (20%) of the required vehicle parking.
3. 
Walkable Development Credit. All retail, service or institutional uses may reduce the required vehicle parking by:
a. 
Five percent (5%) if there are more than one thousand (1,000) dwelling units within one-half (1/2) mile, measured along the direct pedestrian connections; and
b. 
Ten percent (10%) for all sites fronting on an activity street as defined in Section 406.020(D).
4. 
Public Parking Credit. Any site within six hundred (600) feet of a public parking area may reduce the required vehicle parking at a rate of one (1) space for every three (3) public parking spaces.
5. 
Deferral Of Parking Space Requirements. A portion of the required parking may remain unimproved until the Planning Commission or the City Council deems it necessary to adequately serve parking demand. The Planning Commission or City Council, whichever is charged with granting final approval, shall determine that the initial occupancy of the premises will be adequately served by the lesser number of spaces and a site plan shall indicate the location, pattern and circulation to and from the deferred parking spaces. The area reserved for future parking shall be brought to finished grade and shall be landscaped, and it shall not be used for any permanent purpose or structure unless a revised site plan and parking plan is approved.
6. 
Off-Site Parking. Required parking spaces shall be located on the same lot as the use it is intended to serve, provided that the Director of Community Development may allow all or a portion of the required parking to be located on a separate lot subject to the following standards.
a. 
Ineligible Activities. Off-site parking shall not be used for residential uses, restaurants, bars or convenience stores and other convenience-oriented uses. Required parking for persons with disabilities shall not be located off-site.
b. 
Location. No off-site parking area shall be more than three hundred (300) feet from the site served, measured along the shortest legal, practical walking route. Off-site parking areas shall not be separated from the site by a street right-of-way with a width of more than eighty (80) feet unless a grade-separated pedestrian walkway is provided.
c. 
Zoning Classification. Off-site parking areas shall require the same or a more intensive zoning classification than that required for the use served.
d. 
Agreement For Off-Site Parking. Off-site parking areas under different ownership than the use served require a written agreement between the owners of record, in a form recommended by the Director of Community Development for recordation. Recordation of the agreement by the Register of Deeds is required before issuance of a building permit.
7. 
Shared Parking. Required parking may be reduced for any site containing multiple uses or for adjacent sites with different uses according to the following table. Any shared parking arrangement shall require an agreement among all landowners participating in the agreement to ensure access, joint use, maintenance, and other operational issues. A reduction program that differs from the table below may also be approved in association with the agreement upon preparation of the joint parking study for the sites and uses.
Table 407.010-2: Shared Parking
Percentage Of Required Parking By Time Period
Weekday
Weekend
All
Use
6:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. to 1:00 A.M.
6:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. to 1:00 A.M.
1:00 A.M. to 6:00 A.M.
Employment
100%
10%
5%
5%
5%
Retail or service
75%
75%
100%
90%
5%
Restaurant
50%
100%
75%
100%
25%
Entertainment and recreation
30%
100%
75%
100%
5%
Church
5%
25%
100%
50%
5%
School
100%
10%
10%
10%
5%
Dwellings
25%
90%
50%
90%
100%
Lodging
50%
90%
75%
100%
100%
E. 
Parking Design Standards.
1. 
Location, Scale And Landscape. All on-site parking shall be organized into parking blocks and arranged on the site to minimize the impact on streetscapes and adjacent lots, subject to the following table:
[Ord. No. 4585 § 8, 2-16-2016]
Table 407.010-3: Parking Location, Scale And Landscape
Spaces
Front
Side
Rear
Between front building line and lot frontage
Behind front building line and rear building line
Behind front building line
251 or more
Prohibited: Must be broken into smaller parking blocks
Prohibited: Must be broken into smaller parking blocks
5% internal landscape and 12 feet perimeter buffer
151 to 250
Prohibited: Must be broken into smaller parking blocks
8% Internal landscape and 12 feet perimeter buffer
12 feet perimeter buffer
51 to 150
8% internal landscape and 12 feet perimeter buffer
8% Internal landscape and 6 feet perimeter buffer
8 feet perimeter buffer
26 to 50
5% internal landscape and 8 feet perimeter buffer
5% internal landscape and 6 feet perimeter buffer
No requirement
20 or fewer
5% internal landscaping and 8 feet perimeter buffer
5% internal landscape and 6 feet perimeter buffer
No requirement
Perimeter buffers and internal landscape shall meet the design and landscape standards in Section 407.040 and Table 407.040-5, and, where applicable, can be incorporated within the buffer required in Section 407.040.
In residential districts, any parking area for over 4 vehicles shall also meet the building setbacks for that district, or be setback at least 30 feet, whichever is greater. Additional setbacks and frontage requirements per zoning districts may place additional restrictions or prohibitions on parking in front of buildings or near streetscape.
2. 
Landscape Locations. Parking lot landscaping shall be reasonably dispersed throughout off-street parking areas.
3. 
Planting Areas. The interior dimensions of any planting area used to satisfy parking lot landscaping standards shall be sufficient to protect plant materials and to ensure proper growth. Planting areas that contain trees shall be at least seven (7) feet wide in each direction and provide at least one hundred and forty (140) square feet per tree.
4. 
Surfacing.
a. 
All off-street parking and loading areas, except those required for single-family or duplex uses, shall be surfaced with:
(1) 
Five (5) inches of concrete;
(2) 
Six (6) inches of asphalt; or
(3) 
Three (3) inches of asphalt combined with eight (8) inches of aggregate base and subgrade base.
b. 
Off-street parking areas serving single-family and duplex residences shall be graded and paved with an approved asphalt, concrete or paver brick. All passenger cars shall be parked on paved driveways or parking areas relating to a garage or carport.
5. 
Lighting. Any off-street parking area providing space for five (5) or more vehicles that are used after dark shall be provided with lights that provide at least an average of one-quarter (1/4) foot candle over the entire parking area measured on the ground surface within the parking area. Off-street parking areas in LI and HI Districts shall be exempt from the minimum lighting standard of this Subsection. Parking lot lighting shall be subject to the outdoor lighting standards of Section 407.060.
6. 
Drainage. All off-street parking and loading areas shall be designed according to the City of Blue Springs Design and Construction Manual. Drainage plans for off-street parking and loading areas shall be reviewed by the Director of Public Works.
7. 
Curbing. The perimeter of all off-street parking and loading areas, their access drives and internal islands shall be curbed, with the exception of driveways for single-family and duplex residences. As an alternative to curbed edges on the perimeter and landscape islands, the Director of Public Works may approve alternate edges as part of an overall stormwater management plan for the parking area.
8. 
Striping. Off-street parking areas containing five (5) or more spaces shall be delineated by pavement striping.
9. 
Dimensions. Required off-street parking spaces shall be designed according to the following table. If angles not shown in the table, required parking space dimensions shall be interpolated from the table.
Table 407.010-4: Parking Area Design
Parking Angle
Stalls Served By Aisle
Traffic Flow
Stall Width
(A) (feet)
Stall Length
(B) (feet)
Aisle Width
(C) (feet)
90°
One or both sides
One- or two-way
8.5
18.5
28
8
26
9.5
25
45°
One side
One-way
8.5
18.5
13
8
12
9.5
11
45°
Both sides
One-way
8.5
18.5
13
8
12
9.5
11
45°
Both sides
Two-way
8.5
18.5
26
8
25
9.5
24
This table shows common parking configurations. Base on different site contexts, different parking angles and dimensions may be used to minimize the parking footprint and better meet the intent of this Section, if based on established site plan guidance, such as Planning and Urban Design Standards, American Planning Association.
F. 
Stacking Spaces For Drive-Throughs. In addition to meeting the parking requirements of this Section, drive-through facilities shall comply with the following minimum stacking space standards.
1. 
Stacking Space Schedule. The minimum number of stacking spaces required shall be as follows.
Table 407.010-5: Drive-Through Stacking
Use
Minimum Spaces
Measured From
Bank teller lane
4
Teller or window
Automated teller machine
3
Teller
Restaurant drive-through
8
Order box*
Car wash stall, automatic
6
Entrance
Car wash stall, self-service
3
Entrance
Other
Determined by Traffic Engineer based on traffic study
Gasoline pump island
One stacking space per pump which can be located in a drive aisle if the aisle is a minimum of 30 feet wide
*
A minimum of four (4) vehicle que from the pick-up window to the order box shall be provided.
2. 
Design And Layout. Stacking spaces shall be subject to the following design and layout standards.
a. 
Stacking spaces shall be a minimum of eight (8) feet by twenty (20) feet in size.
b. 
Stacking spaces shall comply with the parking location and design standards of Subsection (E).
c. 
Stacking spaces shall be designed so as not to impede on- and off-site traffic movements or movements into or out of parking spaces.
d. 
Stacking spaces shall be separated from other internal driveways with raised medians or alternative separation as deemed necessary by the Director of Public Works for traffic movement or safety.
G. 
Off-Street Loading. Off-street loading spaces shall be provided in accordance with the following minimum standards.
Table 407.010-6: Minimum Off-Street Loading Requirement
Floor Area
Number Of Spaces
Retail and Service, Warehouse, Wholesale, Manufacturing Uses
3,000 to 25,000
1
25,001 to 85,000
2
85,001 to 155,000
3
155,001 to 235,000
4
235,001 to 325,000
5
325,001 to 425,000
6
425,001 to 535,000
7
535,001 to 655,000
8
655,001 to 775,000
9
775,001 to 925,000
10
925,001+
10 + 1 per 200,000 square feet above 925,000
Office, Nursing Home, Hospital, Hotels, Institutions
3,000 to 100,000
1
100,001 to 335,000
2
335,001 to 625,000
3
625,001 to 945,000
4
945,001 to 1,300,000
5
1,300,001 to 1,800,000
6
1,800,001+
6 + 1 per 500,000 square feet above 1,800,000
[R.O. 1996 § 407.020; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Intent. It is the intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Provide adequate access to all lots and blocks in conjunction with the street networks, blocks and street types of a particular development pattern.
2. 
Balance the interests of access for pedestrians and bicycles with access for vehicles.
3. 
Protect the design integrity of streetscapes and minimize interruptions in streetscape by curb-cuts and drive aisles.
4. 
Manage access and circulation within larger sites, development projects and blocks.
B. 
Applicability. This Section shall apply to:
1. 
All new site plans and development proposals where street access is proposed or altered, or where platting occurs in association with the development;
2. 
Any infill or reuse where over fifty percent (50%) of the parking and circulation area is being altered;
3. 
Any application in an area that is subject to a specific access management study;
4. 
Any application on an activity street; and
5. 
Any application where streetscape improvements are required or proposed.
C. 
Types. The following specific types of access shall be used to access lots:
Table 407.020-1: Access Types
Unlimited Driveway
A driveway that is generally no more than 16 feet to 24 feet wide in the lot frontage area, but can expand to larger pads and approach areas closer to the buildings. Often this may involve a circle drive with two 8-foot to 12-foot access ways. This access is used on larger lots with wide frontages and deep building setbacks.
No illustration intended
Double Driveway
A driveway that is typically between 16 feet and 20 feet wide, and provides an approach to a two car garage. This access is typically used on larger lots with wide frontages.
407 Access Types Double Driveway.tif
Single/Double Driveway
A driveway that is typically between 8 feet and 10 feet wide within the lot frontage area, but can expand to a larger pad and approach area up to 24 feet wide closer to the buildings. This access is used on smaller to medium sized lots with narrower frontages, but can accommodate front or side loaded garages.
 
407 Access Types Single Double Driveway L.tif
407 Access Types Single Double Driveway.tif
Single Driveway
A driveway that is 8 feet to 10 feet at all points before the front building line. It often provides access to a larger pad and approach area behind the front building line to provide access to detached or rear loaded garages. This access is used on smaller lots with narrow frontages, and on streets were minimal interruptions in the streetscape are desired.
 
407 Access Types Single Driveway L.tif
407 Access Types Single Driveway.tif
Shared Driveway
A driveway that serves two lots and is typically located on a lot line of the two properties and coordinated with easements benefitting both parties, and extends to an area where each lot has its own private pad and/or approach area. Shared drives are usually use the single driveway or single/double driveway configurations, and are used on smaller lots with narrow frontages, and on streets were minimal interruptions in the streetscape are desired.
 
407 Access Types Shared Driveway L.tif
407 Access Types Shared Driveway.tif
Common Drive
An access point similar to a shared driveway except that it serves more than 2 but generally no more than 6 lots. Common driveways are typically located in easements or common areas owned jointly by all lots benefitting from the access. Common driveways can provide access to smaller parking blocks or parking areas where maneuvering of vehicles can occur.
 
407 Access Types Common Drive L.tif
No illustration intended
Drive Aisles
A system of internal access ways designed to facilitate circulation of vehicles within a site, often coordinating access to parking areas or cross-access between multiple properties. The drive aisles serve as an organizing element for parking blocks and building sites.
 
407 Access Types Drive Aisles L.tif
No illustration intended
Internal Access Streets
A system of internal access ways designed to mimic public streetscapes and block structure. This access coordinates development and access across multiple or larger scale projects, typically on sites or parcels of greater than 5 acres, so the resulting internal block structure includes blocks of 2 to 5 acres. The internal access streets have a higher design amenity than other access types to create a public realm among private and common areas as an organizing element of sites and buildings.
 
407 Access Types Internal Access St L.tif
No illustration intended
Alley
A shared access system internal to a block and serving all lots on the block (or occasionally all lots on a single block face for single loaded blocks). Alleys typically bisect a block with a simple central alley, although H-shaped, T-shaped or other similar configurations can accommodate irregular blocks or other situations where alley access points may be constrained.
 
407 Access Types Alley L.tif
No illustration intended
D. 
Vehicle Access Requirements. The following requirements coordinate adequate block and lot access based on the context of development, the street type and other access coordination. Where adequate access to any lot is limited by these standards, shared, common or internal block access strategies in Subsection (C) shall be used to provide adequate access to all lots.
1. 
Location And Spacing. Lot access location and spacing shall be limited based on the functional class of streets in Table 407.020-2. Spacing distance between access shall be measured from the perpendicular curb face of the access points, and from the perpendicular curb face of intersecting streets to the closest access point for intersections.
Table 407.020-2: Access Location And Spacing
Functional Class**
Primary Land Use
Arterial*
Collector
Local
Residential
100 feet minimum separation
200 feet + corner
250 feet + signalized
75 feet minimum separation
125 feet + corner
250 feet + signalized
No minimum separation except that a minimum of 50 feet shall be provided from street intersections
75 feet + corner
250 feet + signalized
Non-Residential
200 feet minimum separation
200 feet + corner
250 feet + signalized
150 feet minimum separation
125 inches + corner
250 + signalized
100; minimum separations
75 feet from lot corner
*
Direct access to an arterial street shall be permitted only when the subject property has no other reasonable access to the street system, and only if the City Engineer determines that the proposed access point is safe and is subject to the limits of this table.
**
The City Engineer may allow averaging of the separation of access points along any block face, provided there are no adverse impacts on the transportation network, and the intent of this Section is equally or better served.
2. 
Width.
[Ord. No. 4585 § 6, 2-16-2016; Ord. No. 4679, 8-21-2017]
a. 
Lot access widths shall be limited based on the street type and design context in Table 407.020-3. The percentage and width limits shall apply to the frontage area between the streetscape and building. Where applications of the width limits appears to constrain access, different configurations identified in Table 407.020-1 shall be used.
Table 407.020-3: Access Width Except Single- And Two-Family Residential
Street Type
Primary Land Use
Standard
Neighborhood
Activity
Natural
Residential*
25% of lot maximum; may not exceed 24 feet unless designed as internal access streets
20% of lot maximum; may not exceed 20 feet unless designed as internal access streets
15% of lot maximum; may not exceed 20 feet unless designed as internal access streets
15% of lot maximum; may not exceed 20 feet unless designed as internal access streets
Non-Residential
20% of lot maximum; may not exceed 30 feet unless designed as internal access streets
No more that 10% cumulative on an entire block face without using shared access or internal access streets for the block
15% of lot maximum; may not exceed 24 feet unless designed as internal access streets
No more that 10% cumulative on an entire block face without using shared access or internal access streets for the block
N/A: Activity streets are designed for limited commercial lot access and require alley system for block or internal access streets for the block
15% of lot maximum; may not exceed 24 feet unless designed as internal access streets
No more that 10% cumulative on an entire block face without using shared access or internal access streets for the block
*
Exceptions to the % width for residential access can be given up to 20 feet of width to accommodate limited access within 20 feet of any front-loaded garage, provided it is not otherwise limited by the residential design standards.
b. 
Single- and two-family residences shall have a paved driveway or driveways that shall not exceed fifty percent (50%) coverage within the front yard of the street-facing side yard setback area in which the driveway is located, and off-street or on-street parking of vehicles weighing more than six (6) tons or containing more than two (2) axles shall be prohibited in MF-18 and less intensive districts. This provision shall not prohibit temporary parking of vehicles making pickups or deliveries. Driveway widths shall be limited to a maximum of thirty (30) feet within the right-of-way.
c. 
Single- or two-family residences wherein the driveway length exceeds two hundred (200) feet shall be allowed an exception to the paving requirement for driveways but shall provide the minimum number of parking spaces on a paved surface.
3. 
Corner Visibility. Sight distance standards are based on criteria in the latest edition of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Green Book. On corner lots nothing shall be erected, placed, planted, or allowed to grow in such a manner which will obstruct the view of the traveling public based on AASHTO Green Book sight distance standards. This sight triangle standard may be increased by the Director of Public Works when deemed necessary for traffic safety. Additionally, right of way is required at intersections per the City of Blue Springs Design and Construction Manual to allow for the construction of Americans with Disability Act[1] sidewalk, curb ramps, signalization components, etc.
[1]
Editor's Note: See 42 U.S.C. § 12101 et seq.
4. 
Traffic Impacts. Wherever the City Engineer determines that the above requirements will adversely impact the function of the transportation network in the vicinity of the site, either due to traffic impacts of the proposed use, or the design of the access in relation to the streetscape, alternative access standards may be required to better meet the intent of this Section. In addition, any specific access management study or plan for a portion of the City may alter the application of these standards and guidelines.
E. 
Pedestrian Access Requirements. All lots shall include direct pedestrian connections and circulation routes at the same or greater frequency as is provided by streets, driveways and internal access streets.
1. 
Generally. At a minimum, sidewalks shall directly connect each of the following:
a. 
All public entrances to buildings;
b. 
The public sidewalk on adjacent streets or internal access streets;
c. 
On-site parking areas;
d. 
Private, common or public areas that are part of the open space system in Section 406.030, to the extent any are on the site or adjacent to the site;
e. 
Adjacent sites, where pedestrian access between sites by way of the public streets or internal access streets are remote [more than three hundred (300) feet away].
2. 
Sidewalk Widths. Internal sidewalks shall meet the following requirements:
Table 407.020-4: Internal Sidewalk Widths
Generally
5 feet minimum
Primary routes (between parking and buildings) in multi-family projects
6 feet minimum
Any building facade abutting a parking area or any sidewalk abutting parking with vehicle overhangs
8 feet minimum
Along any non-residential building facade with a primary entrance
12 feet minimum
3. 
Crossings. All driveways and alleys shall intersect with sidewalks on the perimeter of the block at the sidewalk grade, and the material and construction of the sidewalk shall continue across the drive. For drive aisles and internal access streets, the vehicle grade may interrupt the sidewalk. Where the pedestrian crossing exceeds twenty-four (24) feet, cross-walks or other features to identify pedestrian crossings may be required. Design features such as bump outs, raised crossings, medians or other landscape and urban design amenities that emphasize the pedestrian crossing and shorten the distance pedestrians cross dedicated vehicle ways may be considered.
F. 
General Standards. Note: Construction standards for improvements in public right of way are located in the Public Works Design and Construction Manual and design and construction of all improvements shall meet the standards and requirements contained in such manual.
1. 
Off-street parking spaces shall be arranged so that no vehicle will back directly onto a street. All private parking areas, drive aisles and internal access streets shall be located off of the street right-of-way.
2. 
Access to property shall be allowed only by way of driveways, and no other portion of the lot frontage shall be used for ingress, egress or parking.
3. 
Any driveway design must allow an entering vehicle turning speed of fifteen (15) miles per hour to help reduce interference with through street traffic. Radii of driveway shall be sufficient to achieve this standard for the types of vehicles that the driveway is intended to serve.
4. 
There must be sufficient on-site vehicle storage to accommodate queued vehicles waiting to park or exit, without interfering with street traffic.
5. 
Provisions for circulation between adjacent parcels should be provided through coordinated or joint parking systems.
6. 
Driveway placement should be such that loading and unloading activities will in no way hinder vehicle ingress or egress.
7. 
Driveway design must be such that vehicles entering the driveway from the street will not encroach upon the exit lane of a two-way driveway. Also, a right-turning exiting vehicle will be able to use only the first through-traffic lane available without encroaching into the adjacent through-lane.
8. 
No construction, grading, excavation, repair or reconstruction of any street, curb or gutter; or any sidewalk or driveway between the street and property line shall be commenced without first obtaining a right-of-way work permit from the Director of Public Works.
9. 
Right turn lanes, left turn lanes, tapers, and other traffic control features may be required to ensure proper design, function, and minimizing impacts to traffic progression of the roadway. Requirements must be based on a traffic analysis as described in the Public Works Design and Construction Manual that considers all potential users of the right-of-way and the development context.
10. 
Appropriate sight distances shall be provided based on the latest edition of A Policy on Geometric Design and Highways and Streets, issued by AASHTO. This guide shall be used based on the roadway context, considering traffic controls, stopping points of vehicles entering the roadway and the design speeds for on-coming vehicles.
11. 
Any construction, grading, excavation, repair or reconstruction of any street, curb, sidewalk or access point in the right-of-way shall require a right-of-way work permit from the City.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.030; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Intent. It is the intent of this Section to:
1. 
Promote good site design by establishing a relationship of buildings and sites with the public realm created by streetscapes and open spaces.
2. 
Value the design, function, appropriate application of different types of open space, rather than solely the quantity of space.
3. 
Promote designs for unbuilt portions of lots that serve multiple functions, including active spaces for people, aesthetic functions, buffer and screening and ecological functions, to increase the value and minimize the impact of development.
4. 
Consider the context of sites and buildings and how the design of site frontages can enhance the broader character of the area.
5. 
Create focal points for the site, block, or project that establish a pedestrian scale or gathering places.
6. 
Support and expand the open space systems that support development (see Section 406.030) with site-specific designs that relate to the broader systems.
B. 
Applicability.
1. 
Generally. The standards in this Section apply to the design and arrangement of buildings and open areas of a lot adjacent to the right-of-way and along streetscapes. They supplement the building and lot standards of zoning districts, and other site design standards, however, effective use of frontage types can meet multiple standards. These requirements also supplement the open space system required in Section 406.030 of the subdivision regulations and provide smaller scale project, block and site-specific civic spaces.
2. 
Specifically. The standards of this Section shall apply to:
a. 
All new site plans or development applications for new buildings.
b. 
Any application for a building permit for additions or rehabilitation, where twenty percent (20%) or more of the existing frontage area will be reconfigured, or fifty percent (50%) or more of the site will be reconfigured.
c. 
Any application on an activity street.
d. 
Any project where streetscape improvements are required or proposed.
e. 
For infill and rehabilitation projects, the Community Development Director may waive the applicability of this Section where the nature of the application presents no work along the street frontage and the opportunities to implement the intent of this Section are not present.
C. 
Permitted Frontage Types. The permitted frontage types shall be based on zoning districts and the block and street context of a site, as indicated in Table 407.030-1.[1] The limitations by street type shall apply to public streets and to internal access streets designed to the standards of that street type (see Section 407.020). Specific plans may further specify frontage types permitted on a block or street basis.
[1]
Editor's Note: Table 407.030-1, Permitted Frontage Types, is included as an attachment to this Chapter.
D. 
Frontage Design Standards. Frontages shall be designed according the specific type, and the standards below for each different type. These standards are in addition to any other standards required for building types and setbacks or site design, although proper design and arrangement of open spaces may meet multiple goals and requirements.
[Ord. No. 4570 § 3, 10-5-2015]
Enhanced Streetscape Frontage
An area along the street frontage that may be common or dedicated to the public as part of the right-of-way standards. It includes pedestrian enhancements beyond those required by the street type standards to support buildings fronting directly on the streetscape.
Width
Entire lot frontage
Depth
8 feet or 15 feet; or
0 feet for sites fronting on a street designed to exceed the pedestrian amenity specifications for an activity street
407 Enhanced Streetscapr Frontage.tif
Design And Performance Standards
60% minimum front face of building, 75% on activity street (small commercial building)
70% minimum front face of building, 90% on activity street (mixed-use building)
40% minimum front face of building, 60% on activity street (pad site building)
50% minimum front face of building, 70% on activity street (small industrial/workshop building)
75% minimum front face of building (live/work building).
The enhanced streetscape frontage shall be designed solely for pedestrian amenities such as walk ways, gathering areas or landscape to increase the comfort in pedestrian areas.
Building frontage shall occur along at least 70% of the frontage.
Buildings shall have direct access to the streetscape or to any enhanced streetscape provided on the private lot.
One small shade tree for every 25 feet and/or one large shade tree for every 40 feet; plus ornamental planting in conjunction with the overall streetscape design.
Outside seating or other gathering places should be provided, either through seating areas associated with the building use or through street furniture or other type of street amenity designed for pedestrian use.
Facades fronting on the streetscape should have high permeability with frequent windows and entrances to activate the space.
Frontage Plaza
A small area recessed within the building footprint or arranged at a corner of a building creating a focal point for the building entrance, creating a transition area with the streetscape, and designed as a gathering place with formal or informal seating.
Area
5% to 15% of building footprint; at least 10% for any building footprint over 10,000 square feet or building over 3 stories
Depth
15 feet to 40 feet
Width
20 feet to 100 feet
407 Frontage Plaza.tif
Design And Performance Standards
Building or plaza frontage shall occur on at least 60% of the lot frontage.
Buildings shall have direct access to the streetscape or plaza; the plaza shall have direct pedestrian access to the public sidewalk in the streetscape.
One ornamental tree for every 200 square feet; one small or large shade tree for every 500 square feet.
Allocation of space shall be: 10% to 40% landscape; and 60% to 90% hardscape.
Facades fronting on the plaza should have high permeability with frequent windows and entrances to activate the space.
The width:height ratio for buildings on the plaza should be between 2:1 and 1:2.
Courtyard
A recessed area within the building footprint or an open area organizing multiple buildings that creates a common focal point and point of entry for the building(s) fronting on the courtyard. The edge along the lot frontage establishes a transition to the public streetscape, and the proportions of the space and building facades create an outdoor room.
Area
400 square feet minimum;
50 square feet per dwelling unit for residential;
10% to 20% of building(s) footprint for non-residential
Width
40 feet to 150 feet
Depth
40 feet to 150 feet
407 Courtyard.tif
Design And Performance Standards
Building or courtyard frontage shall occur on at least 70% of the lot frontage.
Buildings shall have direct access to the streetscape or courtyard; the courtyard shall have direct pedestrian access to the public sidewalk in the streetscape.
One ornamental tree for every 200 square feet; one small or large shade tree for every 500 square feet.
Allocation of space shall be: 0 to 30% turf; 40% to 75% landscape; and 20% to 40% hardscape.
Facades fronting on the courtyard should have high permeability with frequent windows and entrances to activate the space.
The width:height ratio for buildings on the courtyard should be between 1:2 and 2:1.
The depth:height ration for buildings on the courtyard should be between 1:2 and 3:1.
Terrace
A shallow open area across multiple frontages along a block face, that creates a continuous landscape element along the streetscape. Buildings are setback at a consistent distance to create a common open area. The terrace can be elevated above the streetscape to create building access closer to grade along blocks with grade changes. The terrace may be landscaped as a yard or garden in more residential settings, or it may include hardscape elements in more compact, walkable settings.
Width
Entire lot frontage
Depth
10 feet to 30 feet
407 Terrace.tif
Design And Performance Standards
Residential:
One ornamental or small shade tree for every 40 feet of frontage or one large shade tree for every 75 feet of frontage (in addition to required street trees).
Allocation of space shall be: 0 to 70% turf; 20% to 90% landscape; and 10% to 20% hardscape.
Non-Residential:
One ornamental or small shade tree for every 40 feet of frontage or one large shade tree for every 75 feet of frontage (in addition to required street trees).
Allocation of space shall be: 0 to 70% turf; 10% to 90% landscape; and 10% to 90% hardscape.
General:
Seating areas, either provided in association with the building use/building entrances, or as street furniture should be provided in appropriate gathering places.
Only limited driveways or vehicle drive aisles are permitted to cross the frontage area.
Yard And Setbacks
A large open area with a building setback from the property line to create a larger, uninterrupted open area. The yard generally creates a large landscaped area across several frontages along a block face, with buildings setback at a common distance — typically greater than other frontage types — where landscape designs rather than building frontages establish the relationship and transitions to the streetscape.
Area
20% to 40% of lot, minimum (dependent on zoning district)
Width
Entire lot frontage
Depth
30 feet minimum, but dependent on setback of zoning district
407 Yard and Setbacks.tif
Design And Performance Standards
One ornamental or small shade tree for every 40 feet of frontage or one large shade tree for every 75 feet of frontage (in addition to required street trees).
Allocation of space shall be: 50 to 95% turf; 5% to 50% landscape.
Buffer Edge
A concentrated and heavily landscaped and/or bermed open area used to separate the site, and any potential impacts of the development and site design, from the streetscape or adjacent lots.
Area
20% to 40% of lot, minimum (dependent on zoning district)
Width
Entire lot frontage
Depth
10 feet minimum, but dependent on setback of the zoning district and required buffer standards
407 Buffer Edge.tif
Design And Performance Standards
One ornamental or small shade tree for every 40 feet of frontage or one large shade tree for every 75 feet of frontage (in addition to required street trees).
A combination of a hedge, evergreen and/or berm shall be used to create a continuous buffer (in conjunction with required buffer standards in Section 407.040).
Allocation of space shall be: 30 to 70% turf; 30% to 70% landscape.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.040; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Intent. It is the intent of this Section to:
1. 
Enhance the environmental and ecological function of unbuilt portions of sites, including reduced air or water pollution and reduced heat gain from large expanses of blank walls or paved surfaces.
2. 
Improve the aesthetic character of development with natural landscape materials.
3. 
Coordinate landscape and design amenities across multiple sites, improving the character of districts and neighborhoods.
4. 
Screen and mitigate the visual, noise or other impacts of high-intensity areas of sites, including loading areas, external equipment, or other site utility areas.
5. 
Focus particular attention on the design of landscapes to improve the transitions and relationships to the public realm formed by the open space system, streetscapes, internal access streets, and lot frontages, or other similar public or common areas.
B. 
Applicability. The standards of this Section shall apply to all development except:
1. 
Agriculture (limited) in the RE District; and
2. 
Improvements or repairs to existing development that do not result in an increase in floor area and changes in use that do not result in an increase in intensity.
C. 
Landscape Requirements. The required landscape materials shall be based on a landscape plant unit system applied to four (4) different types of areas on a site: frontage design (Section 407.030), parking (Section 407.010), buffers [Section 407.040(D)], and other open spaces. Landscape requirements may also apply to streetscapes and open space systems to the extent they are part of the design for any project.[1]
1. 
Species And Size.
Table 407.040-2: Plant Size And Specifications
Plant Type
Size And Specifications
Medium and large shade tree
2 inches minimum caliper
Small shade/ornamental
1.5 inches minimum caliper
Upright evergreen
4 feet minimum height
Conifers/evergreen trees
6 feet minimum height
Shrubs
18 inches to 24 inches height; 3 feet minimum at maturity
3 feet to 5 feet on center
Perennial/ornamental
1 gallon minimum
2 feet to 3 feet on center
Ground treatments
Ground cover: 50% coverage 1st year; 100% after year 1
Mulch: 2 inches to 4 inches — limited to areas immediately around plants or where ground cover not yet established
Lawn: seeded or sod suitable to Blue Springs climate and soils; complete coverage after first growing season
2. 
Plant Quality. All plants shall conform to or exceed the plant quality standards of the most recent edition of American Standard for Nursery Stock, published by the American Association of Nurserymen. Plants shall be nursery-grown and adapted to the local area.
3. 
Required Tree Types. All required trees shall follow recommendations of Great Trees for Blue Springs included in Appendix A3 of the Comprehensive Plan. More specific recommendations or additional guidance may be considered through a specific plan or application of the Natural Resource Inventory (NRI) analysis included in that Appendix.
4. 
Species Mix. When more than ten (10) trees are required to be planted to meet the standards of this Section, a mix of species shall be provided, unless broader urban forest diversity is already accounted for through a block-scale street tree plan, specific plan, or other application of the Natural Resource Inventory (NRI) in Appendix A3 of the Comprehensive Plan. In order to promote diversity in the urban forest and to prevent the spread of disease among trees, the number of species to be planted shall vary according to the overall number of trees required to be planted in accordance with the following requirements:
Table 407.040-3: Species Mix
Required Number Of Trees
Minimum Number Of Species
11 — 20
3
21 — 30
4
31 — 40
5
40 +
6
5. 
Use Of Existing Plant Material. Vegetation and plant material that exists on a site prior to its development may be used to satisfy the landscaping standards of this Section, provided that it meets the size, variety and locational requirements of this Section. Any existing trees that are healthy, not damaged during construction, and otherwise meet the requirements of this Section may be credited towards the plant unit requirement subject to the following:
Table 407.040-4: Tree Credits
Diameter Of Tree At 4 Feet, 6 Inches Above Ground Level
Credit
15 1/4 inches or more
10 units per 5 inches (maximum 50 units per tree)
10 1/4 to 15 inches
30 units
6 1/4 to 10 inches
20 units
2 to 6 inches
10 units
Less than 2 inches
No credit
6. 
Existing Tree Protection.
a. 
When preservation is required, measures will be taken to preserve trees on site as practical or economically feasible. Existing trees and their root zones that are to be saved shall be protected from all construction activities, including earthwork operations, movement and storage of equipment and vehicles, and placement of construction materials and debris. Erosion protection measures may be required to prevent siltation of the tree preservation areas during construction. Protection zones may be established by the Community Development Director to ensure trees and their root zones are adequately protected and are not damaged during site development operations. In any event, it is the developer's responsibility to use adequate protection measures to ensure tree preservation occurs.
b. 
Every effort shall be made to locate utility easements away from tree preservation areas. However, utility easements may be located adjacent to tree preservation areas as long as adequate clearance and protection is provided for the tree preservation area during the installation of the utilities adjacent to the tree preservation easement. When utilities or infrastructure systems must cross tree preservation areas, every effort shall be made to minimize tree removal in such areas.
c. 
To ensure protection of tree preservation areas, protection zones shall be delineated on the site development plans. The plans shall identify the type and diameter of trees to be saved. Note: City staff may not enforce tree protection measures and it will be the property owner's responsibility to ensure measures are taken.
d. 
When preservation is required and trees die during construction, the property owner shall be required to replace the same type of tree amount and diameter in inches as was present before construction. Multiple trees can be used to accomplish the number of inches required; however, no replacement tree can be less than two (2) inches in diameter. Trees shall be replaced in the same general location as originally grown. If there is not adequate room to replace the trees in the same location, then the Community Development Director may approve alternate locations.
[1]
Editor's Note: Table 407.040-1, Landscape Requirements, is included as an attachment to this Chapter.
D. 
Buffers, Screens And Fencing.
1. 
Buffers. Landscape buffers are required when certain land uses are adjacent to one another or when adjacent to certain roadway types. The standards are intended to help ease the land use transition between areas of varying development intensity; to ensure land use compatibility; and preserve the appearance of roadway areas. Each type (A-D) identified in Table 407.040-5[2] shall be designed according to the landscape requirements in Subsection (C) above, and may be modified to meet the frontage designs in Section 407.030.
a. 
Location Of Buffers. Buffers shall be located adjacent to public rights-of-way and along adjoining lots with a different zoning classification. In the case of modifications or additions to an existing building or site, buffers shall only be required along those portions of the site that are directly affected by the proposed improvements as determined by the City.
b. 
Use Of Buffers. Required buffers shall be reserved solely for open space and landscaping. No proposed building addition, structure, parking area or any other type of physical land improvement shall be located in a required buffer, provided that driveways or roads may cross required buffers if necessary to provide access to the building site. Sidewalks, paths and project identification signs may also be located within required buffers.
c. 
Waiver For Small Sites. The area of required buffers shall not be required to exceed ten percent (10%) of the site proposed for development. In cases where buffer requirements would consume more than ten percent (10%) of the site, the Planning Commission may allow the width or location of buffers to be reduced or eliminated. The property owner shall be required to add plant material within remaining buffers or elsewhere on the site and any combination of plants, screening walls and fences or other solutions appropriate to the site and context may be required to meet the intent of this Section.
d. 
Responsibility For Installing Buffers. The owner of the developing property shall always be responsible for providing required buffers. In those cases where a landscape buffer that complies with the buffer standards of this Section is already in place — whether on the site of the developing property or on the site of the adjacent property — the property owner shall not be required to install another landscape buffer. The property owner of a subdivision or other developing site shall only be responsible for ensuring that the intervening landscape buffer complies with the standards of this Section.
[Ord. No. 4795, 2-19-2019]
e. 
Berms And Fences Required. Anytime NB/SO, GB, RC, LI or HI Districts abut a residential district, an undulating four (4) to six (6) foot (or as high as practical) earth berm or six (6) foot fence shall be required in the setback area. Along with the fence or berm, a twenty-five percent (25%) reduction of plant units will be allowed in that particular setback area. Exceptions may be approved where terrain cancels out or removes the benefit of a fence or berm or, in the opinion of the Community Development Director, a fence or berm would not create the desired effect. Where it is determined a fence or berm is not appropriate, a buffer of one hundred twenty-five percent (125%) shall be required.
[2]
Editor's Note: Table 407.040-5, Buffer Types, is included as an attachment to this Chapter.
2. 
Screening. All of the following shall be screened from streets or adjacent property with dense evergreen plants, a fence or wall meeting the standards of Subsection (D)(3), or a combination of both.
a. 
Electrical and mechanical equipment such as transformers, air conditioners, of communication equipment and antennas;
b. 
Permanent or temporary outdoor storage areas, which shall further be subject to all setback standards for the lot, and require at least a Type A buffer;
c. 
Trash enclosures;
d. 
Utility stations;
e. 
Delivery and vehicle service bays, except that bays do not need to be screened from adjacent property with the same or more intense zoning;
f. 
Any parking areas larger than ten (10) spaces and adjacent to property zoned MF-14 or less; and
g. 
Any parking permitted within thirty (30) feet of a public right-of-way shall be screened between two and five tenths (2.5) feet and three and five tenths (3.5) feet high, limited to a combination of plants and/or ornamental fences and walls with architectural details and materials that complement those of the principle building.
3. 
Fences. All fences for screening, security, or privacy shall meet the following standards.
a. 
Front Fences. All fences in front of the front building line shall:
(1) 
Be no higher than four (4) feet;
(2) 
Be limited to ornamental or decorative materials that complement the materials and design of the principal building; and
(3) 
Except for screens for parking, have a transparency or voids of at least thirty-three percent (33%).
b. 
Rear And Side Fences. All rear and side fences located behind the front building line shall:
(1) 
Be limited to no higher than six (6) feet in TF (Two-Family) and less intensive zoning districts and eight (8) feet in all other districts;
[Ord. No. 4723, 3-19-2018]
(2) 
On corner lots, fences within eight (8) feet the right-of-way shall meet the standards in Subsection (D)(3)(a) for front fences and not create a sight distance obstruction as described in Section 407.020(D)(3).
c. 
Other Fence Design Standards.
(1) 
Any fences that could potentially create a sight obstruction for vehicles crossing pedestrian areas or entering the street may require greater transparency or additional location restrictions to allow for safe sight distances.
(2) 
All fences facing public rights-of-way shall be constructed so that the finished side faces the public right-of-way and the support posts are inside the fence and screened from view.
[Ord. No. 4723, 3-19-2018]
(3) 
Fences may be located so that the fence face is at or near the property line; otherwise the fence shall be setback at least three (3) feet from the property line absent more specific standards in these regulations. Any areas set back three (3) feet or more from the property line, which could become enclosed by other similarly located fences, may be required to have at least one (1) gate for access and maintenance equipment.
(4) 
Fences shall be constructed out of any of the following materials:
(a) 
Wood or vinyl simulating wood;
(b) 
Wrought iron or aluminum simulating wrought iron;
(c) 
Stone, brick, concrete with stone or brick veneer, or precast concrete simulated stone or brick; or
(d) 
Chain link or vinyl clad chain link in the rear or side yard only, provided all exposed steel shall have a color finished coat or be galvanized.
(5) 
Fences for security in non-residential districts or fences around recreation amenities such as tennis courts or pools may be exempt from the height and material standards.
(6) 
Any fence proposed across a drainage way or drainage easement shall require review and approval by the Director of Public Works.
d. 
Permits Required. No fence shall be erected, modified or changed in any manner until a fence permit application has been approved by the Director of Community Development. Applications shall be filed upon forms provided by the City and shall clearly show the type, material, and placement of the fence.
E. 
Installation, Maintenance And Replacement.
1. 
Installation. All landscape materials shall be installed according to sound nursery practices in a manner designed to encourage vigorous growth. All landscape elements, living and non-living, shall be healthy and in place prior to issuance of final occupancy certificate. A temporary occupancy certificate may be issued prior to installation of required landscaping if written assurances and financial guarantees are submitted ensuring that planting will take place when planting season arrives. The amount of the financial guarantee shall be equal to one hundred twenty-five percent (125%) of the estimated cost of the plant material based on written cost estimates provided by the property owner and/or property owner's representative.
2. 
Maintenance And Replacement. Trees, shrubs, fences, walls and other landscape and screening elements depicted on plans approved by the City shall be considered requirements of the project in the same manner as parking, building materials and other details of the plan. The land owner, or successors in interest, or agent, if any, shall be jointly and severally responsible for the following:
[Ord. No. 4795, 2-19-2019]
a. 
Regular maintenance of all landscape and screening elements in good condition and in a way that presents a healthy, neat and orderly appearance.
b. 
Proper care of all landscape material free from disease, pests, weeds and litter. This maintenance shall include weeding, watering, fertilizing, pruning, mowing, edging, mulching or other maintenance, as needed, and in accordance with acceptable horticultural practices.
c. 
The repair or replacement of required landscape structures and screening elements (i.e., walls, fences, gates) to a structurally sound condition and orderly appearance.
F. 
Alternative Compliance. Applicants may submit an alternative compliance landscape plan to demonstrate that the intent of this Section can be more effectively met through alternative means. If approved, an alternative compliance landscape plan shall be substituted for the standards in this Section only to the extent shown on the plan.
1. 
Procedure. Alternative compliance landscape plans shall be reviewed in accordance with the site plan and design review procedures in Section 403.070, and the plan shall clearly delineate and identify the modifications and alternatives proposed.
2. 
Review Criteria. Alternative compliance landscape plans may be approved upon a finding that any of the following circumstances exist on the proposed building site or surrounding properties:
a. 
Natural land characteristics or existing vegetation on the proposed development site would achieve the intent of this Section;
b. 
Innovative and exceptional landscaping or architectural design is employed on the proposed development site to achieve a buffering effect that is equivalent to the buffer standards of this Section;
c. 
The required landscaping or buffering would be ineffective at maturity due to topography or the location of improvements on the site; or
d. 
The proposed alternative represents a plan that is as good or better than a plan prepared in strict compliance with the other standards of this Section.
G. 
Landscaping Plan Required. All plans submitted in support of a plan review, conditional use, PD, and final plat shall include a landscape plan. However, conventional single-family and two-family residential developments are exempt from Section 407.040(G)(9) and (11). The following plan standards apply:
[Ord. No. 4625 § 9, 11-21-2016]
1. 
North arrow and scale.
2. 
Topographic information and final grading adequate to identify and properly specify planting for areas needing slope protection.
3. 
The location and contours at one-foot intervals of all proposed berms.
4. 
The location and dimension of all proposed and existing structures, parking lots and drives, sidewalks. Refuse disposal areas, fences above or underground utilities and storm drainage systems, freestanding electrical equipment, recreational facilities, and other freestanding structural features as determined necessary by the City.
5. 
The location, size, spread (at the time of planting), type and quantity of all proposed landscape materials, along with common and botanical names of all plant species. The size, grading and condition shall be specified according to American Association of Nurserymen standards.
6. 
Mature size of plant material shall be drawn to scale.
7. 
Location of hose connections and other watering sources.
8. 
All landscaping required along with landscape calculation in a table format on the drawing breaking out open space, buffers and parking lot unit requirements, and plant units provided.
9. 
The landscape plan shall be properly sealed by a licensed landscape architect, architect, engineer or plant nurseryman licensed to practice in the State of Missouri.
10. 
All existing trees to be saved including type, size, location, and condition shall be shown along with preservation methods anticipated to ensure existing tree health and longevity.
11. 
Upon installation, a landscape architect, architect, engineer or plant nurseryman shall submit a letter certifying the landscape installation is substantially in compliance with the approved landscape plan.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.050; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
General. No parcel, lot, building, or structure in any zoning district shall be used or occupied in any manner so as to create any dangerous, harmful, noxious, or otherwise objectionable element or condition so as to adversely affect the surrounding area or adjoining premises, provided that any use that is allowed by the underlying zoning district regulations, may be undertaken and maintained if acceptable measures and safeguards are employed to limit dangerous and objectionable elements to acceptable limits as established by the following performance standards.
B. 
Fire Hazards. Any activity involving the use or storage of flammable or explosive materials shall be protected by adequate firefighting and fire suppression equipment and by such safety devices as are normally used in the handling of any such material. Such fire hazards shall be kept removed from adjacent activities to a distance which is compatible with the potential danger involved.
C. 
Vibration. No vibration shall be permitted which is discernible without instruments on any adjoining lot or property.
D. 
Noise. Noise which is objectionable due to volume, frequency, or beat shall be muffled or otherwise controlled so that there is no production of sound discernible at lot lines in excess of the average intensity of street and traffic noise at the lot lines. Tornado sirens and related apparatus used solely for public purposes shall be exempt from this requirement.
E. 
Air Pollution. All uses shall be so operated such that no smoke, odor, dust or other form of particulate matter shall be emitted that exceeds the regulations established by the State of Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Such uses shall be located so that prevailing winds will carry such air pollution away from areas of greatest concentration of persons. Also, such uses shall be kept removed from adjacent activities to a distance which is compatible with the potential nuisance or hazard involved.
F. 
Water Pollution. All uses shall conform to the requirements and regulations established by the State of Missouri Department of Natural Resources pertaining to the pollution of streams and other bodies of water.
G. 
Toxic Gases. Every use shall be so operated that there is no emission of toxic, noxious, or corrosive fumes or gases. The storage of toxic gases in such quantities deemed by the Planning Commission or City Council to constitute a potential hazard shall be located, dependent on their weights relative to the normal atmosphere of the immediate vicinity. Gases lighter than air shall be located in topographical areas having an elevation greater than that of the surrounding area. Such toxic gases shall also be located so that prevailing winds shall carry gases away from the areas of the greatest concentration of persons and shall be kept removed from adjacent activities to a distance which is compatible with the potential hazard involved.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.060; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Intent. The intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Eliminate adverse impacts from spillover of light and glare on operators of motor vehicles, pedestrians, and land uses near light sources. With respect to motor vehicles in particular, safety considerations form the basis of these regulations. In other cases, both the nuisance and hazard aspects of glare are regulated.
2. 
Provide attractive and appropriate-scaled features for the public realm, streetscapes, common areas and other outdoor gathering places for people.
3. 
Provide sufficient illumination that allows safe and comfortable use of outdoor spaces, while minimizing the impact on adjacent property.
B. 
Applicability. The following standards shall apply to all exterior lighting except public streetlighting and other lighting that is specifically exempted.
C. 
Flickering And Flashing Lights. No flickering or flashing lights shall be permitted.
D. 
Light Location.
1. 
No fixtures that shine outward and create a glare from any adjoining or abutting residential district or any street right-of-way shall be permitted.
2. 
Lighting used to illuminate parking areas shall be arranged, located or screened to direct light away from any adjoining or abutting residential district or any street right-of-way.
3. 
Light sources of luminaires shall not be located within required setback yard areas except on pedestrian walkways.
E. 
Maximum Illumination And Luminaire Height.
1. 
Luminaires With No Cutoff. When the light source or luminaire has no cutoff, the following standards shall apply:
Table 407.060-1: Luminaires No Cutoff
Underlying Zoning District
Maximum Illumination
(footcandles)
Maximum Luminaire Height
(feet)
RE, SF-12, SF-7, TF, MF-10, MF-14, MF-18, N-L, N-O
0.20
10
NB, SO, PLOS
0.20
15
GB, RC, LI
0.30
20
2. 
Luminaires With Total Cutoff Angle Of Ninety Degrees (90°) Or More. When a luminaire has total cutoff angle of ninety degrees (90°) or more, the following standards shall apply:
Table 407.060-3: Luminaires 90° + Cutoff
Underlying Zoning District
Maximum Illumination
(footcandles)
Maximum Luminaire Height
(feet)
RE, SF-12, SF-7, TF, MF-10, MF-14, MF-18, N-L, N-O
0.50
20
NB, SO, PLOS
0.75
25
GB, RC
1.00
30
LI
1.50
35
3. 
Luminaires With Total Cutoff Angle Of Less Than Ninety Degrees (90°). When a luminaire has total cutoff angle of less than ninety degrees (90°) and is located so that the bare light bulb, lamp, or light source is completely shielded from the direct view of an observer five (5) feet above the ground at the point where the cutoff angle intersects the ground, the following standards shall apply:
Table 407.060-3: Luminaires 90° - Cutoff
Underlying Zoning District
Maximum Illumination
(footcandles)
Maximum Luminaire Height
(feet)
RE, SF-12, SF-7, TF, MF-10, MF-14, MF-18, N-L, N-O
0.50
20
NB, SO, PLOS
2.00
30
GB, RC
3.00
40
LI
4.00
50
F. 
Exemptions. Because of their unique requirements for nighttime visibility and their limited hours of operation, ball diamonds, playing fields, and tennis courts shall be exempt from the maximum illumination and luminaire height standards of this Section, provided that lights used for such activities shall not exceed a maximum post height of eighty (80) feet. Ball diamonds, playing fields, and tennis courts may exceed a total cutoff angle of ninety degrees (90°), provided that the luminaire is shielded to prevent light and glare spill over to adjacent property zoned SF-7 or less intensive. The maximum permitted illumination at the lot line of SF-7 or less intensive property shall not exceed two (2) footcandles.
G. 
Measurements.
1. 
Metering Equipment. Lighting levels shall be measured in footcandles with a direct-reading, portable light meter. The meter shall have a color and cosine-corrected sensor with multiple scales and shall read within an accuracy of plus or minus five percent (5%).
2. 
Method Of Measurement. The meter sensor shall be mounted not more than six (6) inches above ground level in a horizontal position. Readings shall be taken only after the cell has been exposed long enough to provide a constant reading. Measurements shall be made after dark when the light source in question is turned on, then when it is turned off. The difference between the two (2) readings shall be compared to the maximum permitted illumination and property line at ground level. This procedure eliminates the effects of moonlight and other ambient light.
3. 
Exterior Lighting Plan. At the time any exterior lighting is installed or substantially modified, and whenever a building permit is sought, an exterior lighting plan shall be submitted to the Director of Community Development in order to determine whether the requirements of this Section have been met.
H. 
Color Of Light Source. Lighting fixtures should be color-correct types, such as halogen, metal halide or high-pressure sodium vapor, to ensure true color at night and ensure visual comfort for pedestrians. Low-pressure sodium vapor lighting is permissible, especially in developments where energy-efficiency is a priority. Mercury vapor lighting is strongly discouraged.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.070; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
Refer to the Public Works Design and Construction Manual, Section 5600, for stormwater design requirements and all design and construction of improvements shall meet the requirements and standards contained in such Manual.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.080; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Intent. The intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Increase the livability of neighborhoods.
2. 
Blend a variety of residential building types and projects into the broader context of neighborhoods and respect the character of surrounding residential areas.
3. 
Improve the appearance of neighborhoods that have a mix of housing, and focus on the relationship of sites and buildings to the public realm.
4. 
Create neighborhood character with details that emphasize the human scale of neighborhoods, and promote connections and relationships between neighborhoods and supporting areas.
B. 
Applicability. These standards apply to:
1. 
All residential districts Zoned TF or higher intensity;
2. 
Any residential restricted overlay district to the extent they are not modified by an approved residential overlay concept plan;
3. 
Specific building types identified in Chapter 405.
C. 
Building Orientation And Patterns.
1. 
Individual buildings shall be oriented as follows:
a. 
Towards the public streetscape;
b. 
Towards a common courtyard, with access and orientation to the public streetscape; or
c. 
Towards some other internal commons spaces, such as an internal street network, greenway or other natural or civic amenities provided through a planned zoning district.
2. 
All building types shall include allowed frontage types as provided in Section 407.030.
3. 
To the maximum extent practicable, all buildings on a common block frontage or similar grouping shall have the same orientation, avoiding multiple parallel orientations to the public realm or common space.
4. 
Where projects have multiple multi-family buildings on a single lot or parcel and abut property used or zoned for single-family detached houses, buildings shall orient perpendicular to internal property lines to avoid disproportionate massing of large facades. If a perpendicular orientation as described above is not possible horizontal orientation may be used if the internal setback is increased by at least fifty percent (50%).
D. 
Building Mass And Form.
1. 
The composition of buildings within the permitted building type, setback and footprint allowances shall respect the surrounding character of adjacent residential buildings including massing, height, roof pitch and architectural features such as entrance features, cornice and eaves, horizontal lines of windows, shutters, dormers, belvederes and chimneys.
2. 
For projects including three (3) or more buildings, variation in massing within the allowed footprints with main mass, secondary masses or wings shall be used to avoid monotony of adjacent buildings.
3. 
Windows, projecting bays and other simple composition details associated with the internal floor plan of the building shall be used to break up wall planes larger than six hundred (600) square feet or greater than fifty (50) feet in horizontal length. However, inordinately complex massing, such as multiple false peaks or bays should be avoided.
4. 
Where buildings over three (3) stories are permitted, vertical massing shall be created through either material or detail differentiation creating a base [up to one (1) story from the ground level] and a cap [up to fifteen percent (15%) of the uppermost height] to distinguish it from the rest of the facade, or through step backs of at least ten (10) feet for upper stories [above three (3) stories].
5. 
Four-sided design, with entryways, windows and consistent materials and architectural details shall be used on all elevations, and blank walls and uninterrupted elevations shall be avoided.
E. 
Front Entrance Features.
1. 
Each building frontage shall include one (1) of the following front entrance features:
a. 
A porch, at least eight (8) feet deep and at least eighty (80) square feet. Porches may encroach into the required front setback, provided it is between ten (10) feet and twelve (12) feet deep, remains unenclosed, and includes only a single-story roof structure.
b. 
A stoop, at least six (6) feet deep and at least forty-eight (48) square feet. A stoop, including steps to the stoop may encroach up to twelve (12) feet into the required front setback, provided it remains unenclosed and does not include a roofed structure.
c. 
A portico, at least six (6) feet deep and between forty-eight (48) and sixty (60) square feet. A portico may encroach up to six (6) feet into the required front setback and may be enclosed or unenclosed.
d. 
Low-rise or mid-rise apartment buildings may use a forecourt or front entry plaza as the entrance feature.
2. 
All front entrance features shall have pedestrian-scale details, including side light or transom windows, architectural ornamentation, or single-story roofs or canopies that are integral to the overall architectural character and design of the building.
3. 
For projects including three (3) or more buildings, variations of the type and design of front entrance features shall be used to add diversity and visual character to adjacent buildings.
F. 
Exterior Materials.
1. 
Facades. Facades shall include exterior finish materials, including stone, brick, wood or vinyl siding, fiber cement, clapboard, metal, stucco and/or any other comparable or superior quality materials. Vinyl siding must be of the highest durability and fabricated design. Composition of entirely one (1) material is prohibited.
2. 
Balconies And Porches. Balconies and porches shall be made of painted or stained wood, composite or metal.
3. 
Roofs. Roofs shall be sloped and clad in slate, metal, concrete tile, composite shingles or fiberglass shingles.
G. 
Garage Limits. Front-loaded garages shall be limited to no more than twenty-five percent (25%) of the front facade. As an alternative to facades with a larger percentage of front-loaded garages at or in front of the front-building line of the structure, step backs of at least twelve (12) feet to twenty (20) feet, side- or rear-orientation of garages, or detached garages set behind the rear building line shall be used.
H. 
Accessory Structures. Detached garages, carports, trash receptacles/dumpsters/compactors and other accessory structures shall incorporate compatible materials, scale, colors, architectural details and roof slopes as the primary multi-family buildings feature. Flat and shed roofs are prohibited.
I. 
Vehicle And Pedestrian Circulation.
1. 
All buildings shall have a direct pedestrian connection at least six (6) feet wide from the front entrance feature to the streetscape or common space.
2. 
Any project over three (3) acres shall include a pedestrian circulation system connecting all streetscapes, internal access streets and common open spaces with direct walkways at least six (6) feet wide.
3. 
Any project over five (5) feet acres shall either be subdivided into blocks and lots meeting the standards of the UDC or provide internal access streets that mimic the pattern and design of public streets and blocks providing multiple and direct connections for vehicles and pedestrians to surrounding development.
4. 
Any internal streets and civic spaces shall meet the design standards for street types and open space types in Chapter 406.
J. 
Access Limitation.
1. 
Driveway access shall be limited based upon the overall percentage of lot frontage, as specified in Section 407.020. As an alternative to lots with a large percentage of curb cuts and front access driveways, small lots with narrow frontages shall use shared driveways, common driveways, internal access streets and alleys.
2. 
Projects with multiple multi-family buildings on a lot or parcel shall have the primary and direct vehicle access to a collector or arterial street classification. To the maximum extent practicable, access to a local street that also serves single-family residences shall not occur unless required for emergency. Large developments shall have two (2) or more primary access points [one hundred fifty (150) to one hundred ninety-nine (199) dwelling units two (2) primary access points are recommended; two hundred (200) or more dwelling units two (2) or more primary access points are required.]
K. 
Security And Crime Prevention. Site planning should integrate the principles of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) to the maximum extent practicable. Applicants are encouraged to consult with the Blue Springs Police Department and the Community Development Department regarding implementation of CPTED principles. Applicant participation will be noted on the staff reports delivered to the Planning Commission and to City Council. These principles include:
1. 
Territoriality. Space within the development and along the edges should be well defined and delineated to create a sense of ownership, such that intruders and strangers stand out. This may be accomplished through the use of pavement treatments, landscaping, art, signage, screening, fencing and similar techniques.
2. 
Natural Surveillance. An environment should be created where it is possible for people engaged in their normal behavior to observe the spaces around them. Space visibility should be maximized through thoughtful design of building orientation, window placement, entrances and exits, landscaping of trees and shrubs and other physical obstructions. Nighttime illumination of parking lots, walkways, entrances, stairwells and related areas should be utilized to promote an environment in which natural surveillance is possible.
3. 
Access Control. Access control should be planned and implemented to restrict criminal intrusion, especially in areas where activity cannot be easily observed. Access control may include but is not limited to use of fences, walls, landscaping and lighting to prevent or discourage public access to or from dark or unmonitored areas. In addition, sidewalks, pavement, lighting and landscaping areas should be used to guide the public to and from primary development entrances and exits.
4. 
Activity Support. Activity support should be implemented by placing new or existing activities in an area so that individuals engaged in a particular activity become part of the natural surveillance of other areas. For example, picnic areas may be located next to tot lots, not away from such areas, to assist in observation of children at play. Additionally, playground fixtures should not be built near ponds or detention basins or near streets.
5. 
Maintenance. Landscaping, lighting fixtures and other features should be maintained to facilitate the principles of CPTED, territorial reinforcement, natural surveillance and access control.
L. 
Privacy Assurance. Zero (0) lot line side yard setbacks shall be permitted on one (1) side of a lot when shown on an approved final plat, provided that the side yard of the adjoining lot must be at least fifteen (15) feet. To maintain privacy for both the house and the adjoining side yard, windows shall be offset. Clerestory windows are encouraged on the zero (0) lot line side of the residence located on the zero (0) lot line at least six (6) feet above the inside floor levels.
M. 
Open Space.
1. 
Projects with multiple multi-family buildings on a lot or parcel shall have common open space as an organizing element of the project. Pedestrian access to common open space systems shall occur within five hundred (500) feet of every dwelling unit.
2. 
Any project over five (5) acres shall either be subdivided and meet the open space standards of Chapter 406, or provide internal open space that mimic the pattern and design of public open space systems.
3. 
The following areas are not allowed as part of the common open space:
a. 
Active private recreation facilities such as clubhouses.
b. 
Land on easements for overhead electric transmission lines.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.090; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
Applicability. The design standards of this Section shall apply in NB and more intensive zoning districts to any new development, building addition or exterior renovation that requires a building permit from the City of Blue Springs. Review for compliance with these standards shall be conducted in accordance with the site plan and design review procedures of Section 403.070.
B. 
Prohibited Materials. The following materials shall not be used as exterior building materials and shall be prohibited on all exterior walls:
1. 
Concrete finishes or precast concrete panels (tilt wall) that are not exposed aggregate, hammered, sandblasted or covered with a cement-based acrylic coating shall be prohibited;
2. 
Metal panels with a depth of less than one (1) inch or a thickness less than United States Standard 26 gauge shall be prohibited; and
3. 
Mirrored glass with a reflectance greater than forty percent (40%) shall be prohibited from covering more than forty percent (40%) of the exterior walls of any building.
C. 
Preferred Materials. The use of substantial amounts of masonry materials (face brick, stucco, stone) is encouraged. The use of aluminum siding and metal ribbed panels is strongly discouraged. Evaluation of building materials shall be based on the quality of its design and relationship and compatibility to building materials in the immediate neighborhood.
D. 
Form, Scale And Proportion. The form and proportion of buildings shall be consistent with the scale, form and proportion of existing development in the immediate area.
E. 
Masses And Voids. The rhythm of structural mass to voids, such as windows and glass doors, of a front facade shall relate to the rhythms established in adjacent buildings.
F. 
Front And Street Side Exterior Walls. Front and street side exterior walls, excluding windows, doors and overhead doors, consisting of a single undifferentiated plane with a single texture or color shall be prohibited. Visual interest may be accomplished through variations in building plane, materials, colors, entrance canopies, and other design features.
G. 
Visual Interest. Monotony of design in single or multiple building projects shall be avoided. Variation of detail, form, and siting shall be used to provide visual interest. The use of different textures, complementary colors, shadow lines and contrasting shapes may also be used to provide visual interest.
H. 
Screening Of Equipment.
1. 
Roof-Mounted Equipment. Roof-mounted equipment, including ventilators and satellite dishes, shall be completely screened from view [one hundred percent (100%) opacity] or isolated so as not to be visible from any public right-of-way or residential zoning district within three hundred (300) feet of the subject lot. Roof-mounted equipment shall be screened entirely from view using parapet walls at the same height as the mechanical units. For additions to existing buildings that do not meet this standard, individual screens may be permitted with the design subject to approval by the Director of Community Development. Parapet walls and any other approved individual screens shall be coordinated with the building to maintain a unified appearance.
[Ord. No. 4679, 8-21-2017]
2. 
Equipment At Ground Level. All electrical and mechanical equipment located at ground level shall be screened from view [one hundred percent (100%) opacity] or isolated so as not to be visible from the right-of-way of an arterial street or residential zoning district within three hundred (300) feet of the subject lot. Such screens and enclosures, when used, shall be coordinated with the building to maintain a unified appearance.
I. 
Security And Crime Prevention. Site planning should integrate the principles of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) to the maximum extent practicable. Applicants are encouraged to consult with the Blue Springs Police Department and the Community Development Department regarding implementation of CPTED principles. Applicant participation will be noted on the staff reports delivered to the Planning Commission and to City Council. These principles include:
1. 
Territoriality. Space within the development and along the edges should be well defined and delineated to create a sense of ownership, such that intruders and strangers stand out. This may be accomplished through the use of pavement treatments, landscaping, art, signage, screening, fencing and similar techniques.
2. 
Natural Surveillance. An environment should be created where it is possible for people engaged in their normal behavior to observe the spaces around them. Space visibility should be maximized through thoughtful design of building orientation, window placement, entrances and exits, landscaping of trees and shrubs and other physical obstructions. Nighttime illumination of parking lots, walkways, entrances, stairwells and related areas should be utilized to promote an environment in which natural surveillance is possible.
3. 
Access Control. Access control should be planned and implemented to restrict criminal intrusion, especially in areas where activity cannot be easily observed. Access control may include but is not limited to use of fences, walls, landscaping and lighting to prevent or discourage public access to or from dark or unmonitored areas. In addition, sidewalks, pavement, lighting and landscaping areas should be used to guide the public to and from primary development entrances and exits.
4. 
Activity Support. Activity support should be implemented by placing new or existing activities in an area so that individuals engaged in a particular activity become part of the natural surveillance of other areas. For example, picnic areas may be located next to tot lots, not away from such areas, to assist in observation of children at play. Additionally, playground fixtures should not be built near ponds or detention basins or near streets.
5. 
Maintenance. Landscaping, lighting fixtures and other features should be maintained to facilitate the principles of CPTED, territorial reinforcement, natural surveillance and access control.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.100; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
All newly constructed lines for telephone, electrical, television, and other services distributed by wire or cable shall be placed underground and shall not conflict with existing or planned pipelines or conduits or access to other utilities including sewer or water within the easement. This provision shall not be construed to prohibit the construction of above ground or surface equipment associated with an underground distribution system, such as (but not limited to) surface mounted transformers, power terminal pedestals, meters and meter boxes, concealed wires, streetlights and streetlight poles.
[R.O. 1996 § 407.110; Ord. No. 4558 § 1, 8-3-2015]
A. 
At the time of approval of a preliminary plat for a residential subdivision, the Planning Commission shall designate a minimum livable floor area classification for all lots within the subdivision. Livable floor area shall not include open or screened porches, garages or basements, except that finished basements designed for immediate living space shall count towards the overall floor area for residential buildings. Finished basements shall mean finished walls, flooring, ceilings, cabinets, shelving, doors, windows, electrical outlets, and plumbing.
1. 
Classification And Minimum Livable Floor Areas. The range of classifications and corresponding minimum livable floor area shall be as follows.
Classification
Minimum Livable Floor Area
(square feet)
A
2,600
B
2,400
C
2,200
D
2,000
E
1,800
F
1,600
G
1,400
H
1,200
I
1,000
J
850
2. 
Criteria For Classification. Subdivisions are to be classified in a manner that minimizes the difference in dwelling sizes between adjacent residential developments. Unless the developer requests a higher classification, the Planning Commission shall not classify the subdivision more than one (1) step lower than the classification of the abutting subdivision. More than one (1) classification may be established within a subdivision when the Planning Commission finds such multiple classifications appropriate to provide a more harmonious transition in dwelling sizes. However, no more than one (1) classification may be imposed on a single block within the subdivision. In the event the proposed subdivision adjoins land not previously classified, the Planning Commission may designate a classification or classifications for the proposed subdivision that will, in its judgment, be in harmony with the surrounding area. In so doing, the Planning Commission may take into account the average livable floor area and the minimum dwelling size requirements set forth in deed restrictions of adjoining subdivisions and the overall intent of this Section 407.110.
3. 
Classifications To Be Shown On Final Plat. Approved dwelling size classifications shall be depicted on the final plat that is submitted for recordation.
4. 
Effect Of Classification. No building permit shall be issued for construction of a single-family dwelling that contains a total livable floor area less than the minimum livable floor area permitted by the classification approved by the Planning Commission, and it shall be unlawful to construct a dwelling unit with less total livable floor area than the classification requires.
5. 
Lots Not Classified. Each single-family dwelling to be constructed on land not previously assigned a minimum livable floor area classification shall contain a minimum floor area of eight hundred fifty (850) square feet.