Township of Grosse Ile, MI
Wayne County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Adopted by the Township Board of the Town of Grosse Ile 12-13-2010 by Ord. No. 10-06. Amendments noted where applicable.]
GENERAL REFERENCES
Environmental assessment — See Ch. 98.
Condominium projects — See Ch. 71.
Sewage disposal systems — See Ch. 209.
Stormwater management — See Ch. 233.
Subdivision control — See Ch. 238.
Telecommunications facilities — See Ch. 247.
Utilities — See Ch. 258.
Water District — See Ch. 271.
Zoning — See Ch. 285.
The Township Board finds that, as a predominantly residential island community, Grosse Ile Township has unique challenges to ensure that the island remains a sustainable community. The island is vulnerable to large-scale development having a significantly adverse impact on transportation and the ability of the community to provide the necessary infrastructure and services. This chapter is intended to provide for the comprehensive and systematic analysis of the impact and assessment of proposed mitigation for any major development through:
A. 
Providing for Township review and approval of developments that may have a significant impact on transportation, utilities and community services.
B. 
Assisting applicants, the Township and the general public in understanding the impacts of development and identify possible changes to the development proposal or improvements to roadways, utilities and infrastructure to mitigate the impact.
C. 
Ensuring land use decisions are made with consideration to the findings and recommendations in the Township's Master Plan.
D. 
Ensuring adequate utility capacity, including sewer, water, and electricity to ensure that adequate public facilities and services are available concurrent with new development so that orderly development, and growth can occur and protect the public health, safety, and welfare, which can be damaged by exceeding utility capacity.
E. 
Ensuring that the build out of the Township does not exceed capacity of the Township wastewater treatment system.
F. 
Ensuring safe and reasonable transportation conditions on roads and intersections and protect the public health, safety, and welfare, which can be damaged by unmanaged increases in traffic congestion.
G. 
Ensuring safe and reasonable transportation operating conditions on streets and intersections after development of the proposed use.
H. 
Ensuring that the build out of the Township does not exceed the capacity of the bridges leading to the island.
I. 
Protecting the substantial public investment in the existing street and utility system.
J. 
Ensuring that any changes to land use or zoning will not adversely impact the fiscal health of the Township and will maintain a fiscally balanced land use balance.
K. 
Coordinating the environmental protection measures required under various ordinances, including, but not limited to: Chapter 71, Condominium Projects, Chapter 98, Environmental Assessment, Chapter 238, Subdivision Control, Chapter 275, Wetlands and Drainageways, Chapter 282, Woodland and Tree Preservation, and Chapter 285, Zoning.
The following terms used in this chapter shall be defined as follows:
APPLICANT
An individual, partnership, corporation (or agent thereof), or other entity that undertakes the responsibility for any or all of the activities covered by this chapter or Chapter 71, Condominium Projects, Chapter 98, Environmental Assessment, Chapter 238, Subdivision Control, or Chapter 285, Zoning.
AVERAGE DAY
A Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday for most uses. The average day may be a Saturday for uses that have higher peak-hour traffic volumes on a Saturday rather than mid-week.
BACKGROUND TRAFFIC
Traffic anticipated to occur regardless of the decision on the subject application based on overall trends as demonstrated by annual traffic increases and associated with specific approved projects for the opening year of a project. Data such as historic counts and long-range traffic projections from the SEMCOG model shall be considered as part of the background traffic calculation.
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN (CIP)
An annual document adopted by the Township indicating capital projects having funding approval for the current fiscal year and those capital projects which are currently planned for the following five-year period, including the proposed means of financing the same.
DEVELOPMENT
A site plan, subdivision tentative preliminary plat, condominium project, mobile home park, redevelopment, reuse or expansion of a use or building.
GAP (CRITICAL)
The median time headway (in seconds) between vehicles in a major traffic stream which will permit side-street vehicles at a stop- or yield-controlled approach to cross through or merge with the major traffic stream under prevailing traffic and roadway conditions.
LEVEL OF SERVICE
A qualitative measure describing operational conditions within a traffic stream; generally described in terms of such factors as speed and travel time, delay, freedom to maneuver, traffic interruptions, comfort and convenience and safety.
A. 
Operations with very low control delay occurring with favorable progression and/or short cycle lengths.
B. 
Operations with low control delay occurring with good progression and/or short cycle lengths.
C. 
Operations with average control delays resulting from fair progression and/or longer cycle lengths. Individual cycle failures begin to appear. It is typically determined to be acceptable for signalized intersections and the bridges leading to the island.
D. 
Operations with longer control delays due to a combination of unfavorable progression, long cycle lengths, or high V/C ratios. Many vehicles stop and individual cycle failures are noticeable. It is typically determined to be acceptable for unsignalized intersections.
E. 
Operations with high control delays due to a combination of poor progression, long cycle lengths, and high V/C ratios. Individual cycle failures are a frequent occurrence. This is considered to be the limit of acceptable delay.
F. 
Operation with control delays unacceptable to most drivers occurring due to over saturation where arrival rates exceed the capacity of the intersection, poor progression, or very long cycle lengths.
MASTER PLAN
A document which is adopted under the guidance of the Planning Commission in accordance with the Michigan Planning Enabling Act (Public Act 33 of 2008, as amended) and consists of graphic and written materials which indicate the general location for streets, parks, schools, public buildings and all physical development of the Township.
OUT ISLAND
See "undeveloped area."
PEAK HOUR
A one-hour period representing the highest hourly volume of traffic flow in the adjacent street system during the morning (a.m. peak hour), during the afternoon or evening (p.m. peak hour); or representing the hour of highest volume of traffic entering or exiting a site (peak hour of generator).
PLANNING COMMISSION
The Planning Commission of the Township of Grosse Ile, Wayne County, Michigan.
PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITY
A unit dedicated to providing immediate and direct emergency response to fire, medical service, crime, and other community safety needs.
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
The Grosse Ile Township Public Service Commission.
ROADS
A public or private thoroughfare or right-of-way, other than a public or private alley, dedicated to or designed for travel and access to any land, lot or parcel, whether designated as a road, avenue, highway, boulevard, drive, lane, place, court, or any similar designation. Various types of roads are defined in Article 1 of Chapter 285, Zoning.
SEMCOG
The Southeast Michigan Council of Governments; the region's designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for Southeast Michigan.
STRUCTURAL ADEQUACY
Determination by the Township Engineer or the Wayne County Department of Public Services, that the pavement cross section (or bridge design) is of sufficient depth and design to carry the increased traffic volume generated by the proposed development, including the heavy construction vehicles which will be present, without causing undue failure of the infrastructure.
STUDY AREA
The geographic area containing those critical arterial intersections (and connecting roadway segments) which are expected to be affected by the site-traffic generated by a development.
TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (TIP)
A list of all transportation projects receiving state or federal funding by SEMCOG.
TRIP (i.e., DIRECTIONAL TRIP)
A single- or one-direction vehicle movement with either the origin or the destination (exiting or entering) inside a study site.
UNDEVELOPED AREA
A land area that is removed by more than 200 feet from existing utilities and improved roads and has not been previously improved with roads and utilities. Any previously platted lots that are unimproved and currently do not have road and utility access shall be considered an undeveloped area. Any out island that is separated from the main island of the Township and currently does not have road and utility access shall be considered an undeveloped area.
A. 
Impact statement. A community impact statement, fiscal impact study and a transportation impact assessment/statement shall be provided to the Planning Commission for any site plan, special land use, condominium project, subdivision plat or rezoning that meets or exceeds the thresholds for each type of study as follows:
(1) 
Transportation analysis. A transportation impact assessment, transportation impact statement, or transportation comparison shall be required for any of the following, based upon the amount of traffic generated:
Type of Study
Developments Generating the Following Traffic
Transportation impact assessment (study of site and adjacent roadways)
50 to 100 trips during a peak hour; or
500 to 750 trips during a typical day
Transportation impact statement (study of larger area of Township)
Over 100 trips during the peak hour; or
Over 750 trips in an average day.
Any new bridge shall require a transportation impact statement.
Transportation comparison (comparison of the trip generation between existing and proposed zoning and potential traffic impacts resulting from a rezoning)
Any rezoning
(2) 
Community impact statement. A community impact statement shall be required for any of the following, based upon relative demand for utility capacity of various land uses:
Type of Development Proposal
Size of Development Requiring Study
Single-family residential development
50 dwelling units or more
Manufactured home park development
50 dwelling units or more
Multiple-family residential development
70 dwelling units or more
Senior housing development
100 dwelling units or more
Retail or commercial service use (a)
45,000 square feet of gross floor area or more
Restaurant, tavern or banquet hall
12,000 square feet of gross floor area or more
Golf, county or boat club
33,000 square feet of gross floor area or more
Office building (b)
45,000 square feet of gross floor area or more
Institutional building (c)
67,000 square feet of gross floor area or more
Industrial use (d)
100,000 square feet of gross floor area or more
Extension of sewer or water to undeveloped area or out island
Extension that will serve or have the potential to serve 10 acres or more, including adjacent undeveloped land
NOTES:
(a)
Includes all retail uses, banks, commercial day-care centers, lodging, personal service and vehicle service.
(b)
Includes all general, professional and medical offices.
(c)
Includes all community buildings, schools, places of worship and other places of public assembly.
(d)
Includes all manufacturing, transportation, warehousing and storage uses.
(e)
Other uses not identified above shall be as determined by the Planning Commission based upon comparable demand for utility services to those uses listed in the table.
(3) 
Fiscal impact statement. A fiscal impact statement shall be required for any rezoning of 10 acres or more that would allow an increase in residential density. This shall be required to determine if the additional residential population can be served while maintaining a fiscally balanced tax base.
B. 
Reuse of existing buildings. The reuse of existing buildings shall be exempt from this chapter, except where an expansion or increase in intensity to the use will result in a net increase, relative to the previous use, equal to or greater than Subsection A above.
C. 
Phased developments. In determining whether a proposed development exceeds the thresholds described above, all land at one location within the Township under common ownership or control by an applicant shall be included. An applicant shall not purposefully avoid the intent of this section by submitting piecemeal applications for phased developments. However, an applicant may seek approval of only a portion of a subdivision or development, even if the site would generate fewer trips than the thresholds in this section, provided that upon seeking approval of the remaining subdivision or development which generates trips greater than the thresholds, including that approved previously under this subsection, the development shall comply with the requirements of this chapter. Extension of roads or utilities to serve lots in previously platted, but unimproved subdivisions shall consider the full impact of developing all lots in the subdivision that could potentially be served by the infrastructure extension, not just the lots proposed to be developed at the time of application.
D. 
Review process. The impact statement shall be submitted and reviewed concurrently with the site plan, condominium, subdivision, or rezoning application and the environmental assessment required under Chapter 98, Environmental Assessment. The procedures for development reviews are set forth in Chapter 285, Zoning, Chapter 71, Condominium Projects, and Chapter 238, Subdivision Control. The review and approval procedures for impact studies shall be in accordance with § 70-8. The impact statement shall be submitted prior to Planning Commission approval of any site plan. For special land uses and rezoning, the impact statement shall be submitted prior to Planning Commission public hearing. For subdivisions and condominiums, the impact statement shall be submitted prior to Planning Commission review of the preliminary plat or condominium site plan.
E. 
Updates. An impact statement shall also be required for new phases, expansions or changes to a development that requires site plan review, based on the thresholds established above, except where such report was approved within two years of the new site plan submittal date, and a demonstration by the applicant that traffic volumes have not increased by over 2% annually since the original approval.
F. 
Infrastructure improvements. Where an impact statement identifies that there is not adequate infrastructure to support the proposed development, the applicant shall have the option to provide the infrastructure improvements necessary to support the proposed development or wait for the infrastructure to become adequate by improvements made pursuant to county, state or Township capital improvement programs. Approval of development conditioned upon completion of infrastructure shall be with performance guarantees as required by Section 285-20.5 of the Zoning Chapter and § 238-11 of the Subdivision Control Chapter.
The following information is required for transportation impact studies:
A. 
Study area. The analysis should define and justify the study area selected for analysis, subject to approval by the Township.
(1) 
A transportation impact assessment shall study the site access and adjacent roadways.
(2) 
A transportation impact statement shall study the larger area of the Township that is influenced by traffic from the development. At a minimum this shall include any signalized intersection between the site and the closest bridge leading to the island. The study shall also include impacts to both bridges leading to the island.
(3) 
For a rezoning, a transportation comparison shall provide a comparison of the trip generation between existing and proposed zoning and potential traffic impacts resulting from a rezoning. This study shall document the transportation impacts of the net increase in traffic.
B. 
Existing site conditions. Illustrations and a narrative shall be provided that describes the characteristics of the site and adjacent roadway system (planned and existing right-of-way, functional classification, lane configuration, speed limits, any sight distance limitations, locations and potential conflicts with operations at existing access points or intersections within 250 feet of the site's frontage, or greater based upon MDOT access management guidelines, current traffic conflicts, etc.). This description should include surrounding land uses, expected development in the vicinity which could influence future transportation conditions, special site features and a description of any committed roadway improvements.
C. 
Existing traffic conditions. Illustrations, narratives, tables and capacity analysis that reflects existing traffic conditions for the study area defined in § 70-4A above shall be provided, including the following.
(1) 
Roadway alignment, including any problems with sight distance, number of lanes, lane width and lane configurations.
(2) 
Roadway pavement conditions.
(3) 
Posted speed limits for various segments.
(4) 
Existing traffic control.
(5) 
Existing signal timing, as applicable.
(6) 
Existing peak-hour weekday traffic volumes and daily volumes or peak period counts (7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.) to support the selection of the evaluated peak hour (if applicable) on street(s) adjacent to the site. For uses with weekend peak characteristics, the Township may require new counts be taken on typical weekend days during the anticipated peak hours of the proposed use. All counts shall be collected using accepted practices and shall not be over two years old.
(7) 
Existing counts and levels of service for intersections in the study area shall be performed. Existing counts and levels of service for the closest bridge leading to the island shall also be performed.
(8) 
Crash data shall be provided and analyzed for the most recent three-year period upon which information is available for sites in close proximity to intersections identified as either a "critical crash location" or a "fatality" location. SEMCOG data or UD-10 reports should be used in the analysis. Critical crash locations should be identified using SEMCOG's critical crash thresholds. The Planning Commission may waive this requirement upon a finding that the crash potential would not be significantly impacted by the proposed project.
D. 
Nonmotorized conditions. Illustrations, narratives and analysis that reflect existing nonmotorized transportation conditions shall be provided, including:
(1) 
Pedestrian level of service shall consider presence of sidewalks, adequate sidewalk width based upon number of pedestrians and bicycles, good lateral separation with buffers from traffic, traffic volume and speed on adjoining street, crossing opportunities on major streets, presence of traffic signal controls, number of driveways crossing sidewalk, block size and connectivity to adjacent development.
(2) 
Bicycle level of service shall consider presence of multi-modal pathway or bike lane, pavement condition, adequate width of bicycle travel lanes, average bicycle travel speeds, average control delay for bicycles at signalized intersections, network connectivity, traffic volume and speed on adjoining street, and amount of trucks encountered.
E. 
Background traffic conditions. Projects that are not expected to be completed and occupied within one year of site plan approval shall provide a separate evaluation of background traffic for the expected completion date of the proposed development. This background traffic shall be based on historic counts to acknowledge general growth trends in the area, plus traffic associated with approved developments, either currently under construction or approved (and would be operational before the build-out year of this proposed project), in the project area. The background traffic shall be evaluated based on the existing road system plus programmed improvements where funding has been committed. A level of service analysis shall be performed for each intersection in the study area. Unfunded mitigation that is not programmed by Wayne County, the Township or included in the SEMCOG five-year TIP shall not be provided under the background conditions. Background traffic turning movements shall be illustrated in the report.
F. 
Proposed use.
(1) 
For a site plan review, mobile home park, condominium project, a subdivision plat or special land use: a description of factors that relate to project trip generation, such as the number and types of dwelling units, the gross and usable floor area, the number of employees and shift change factors shall be provided. Intended phasing or future expansion shall be noted.
(2) 
For a rezoning, a description of the potential representative uses which would be allowed, compared to representative uses allowed under current zoning. Representative uses shall include the most intense traffic generation use allowed under current zoning in compliance with all Township site development regulations.
G. 
Trip generation forecast. Forecasted trip generation of the proposed use for the a.m. peak hour, the p.m. peak hour and average day shall be provided for the overall project and each phase. The forecasts shall be based on the data and procedures outlined in the most recent edition of Trip Generation published by the Institute of Transportation Engineers. The applicant may use other commonly accepted and published sources of data or supplement the standard data with data from at least three similar projects in Michigan.
H. 
Trip reduction. Any trip reduction for pass-by trips, ride-sharing, other modes and internal capture rates shall be based both on ITE findings and documented survey results acceptable to the Township and Wayne County. Trip reduction factors shall be subject to Township approval.
I. 
Trip distribution. The projected traffic generated shall be distributed (inbound v. outbound, left turn v. right turn) onto the existing street network to project turning movements at site access points and nearby intersections where required. Projected turning movements shall be illustrated in the report. A description of the application of standard engineering procedures for determining the distribution should be provided, such as trip distribution model, market studies or counts at existing driveways.
J. 
Access point level of service. A level of service or capacity analysis is required at the proposed access points using the procedures outlined in the most recent edition of the Highway Capacity Manual published by the Transportation Research Board. The capacity analysis should be provided in the appendix of the report.
K. 
Intersection level of service. Capacity analyses shall be provided for all street intersections and bridges for the study area defined in § 70-4A under the following conditions:
(1) 
Existing traffic under existing road conditions.
(2) 
Future project traffic under existing road conditions with programmed road improvements that will be completed before the build-out year of this proposed project.
(3) 
Future traffic, including project and background, under background road conditions. Background road conditions shall include the existing road system plus programmed improvements where funding has been committed.
L. 
Warrant analysis. A traffic signal warrant analysis based on the procedures outlined in the Michigan Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices shall be performed for unsignalized intersections identified with an existing Level of Service D or worse for existing conditions. The signal warrant analysis should contain, at a minimum, Warrants 1, 2, 6, 9, and 11. For unsignalized intersections projected to operate at Level of Service D or worse under background or future conditions, an assessment using the peak hour (Warrant 11) shall be provided. At least two traffic signal warrants should be met to warrant a signal.
M. 
Bridge. For a transportation impact statement, capacity analyses shall also be provided for the bridges leading to the island, including intersections on both sides of the bridges. The analysis shall take into consideration delays caused by bridge openings for boat traffic and the capacity of toll booths. An assessment shall also be made of the impact of additional population on the capacity of the bridges to evacuate the island in the event of emergency.
N. 
Access design. The report shall include a map and description of the location and design of proposed access (driveways or new street intersections), including:
(1) 
Sight distance limitations and sketches from field notes.
(2) 
Dimensions from adjacent driveways and intersections within 250 feet on either side of the main roadway.
(3) 
Potential for shared access facilities.
(4) 
Data to demonstrate that the number of driveways proposed is the fewest necessary.
(5) 
Support that the access points will provide safe and efficient traffic operation and be in accordance with Wayne County standards.
(6) 
Comments shall also be provided on internal circulation design such as the adequacy of queuing (stacking) at site access points and other features that may affect traffic operations and safety.
O. 
Mitigation. The traffic analysis shall outline mitigation measures and demonstrate any changes to the level of service achieved by these measures for the proposed future conditions. The mitigated capacity analysis should be provided in the appendix of the report.
(1) 
Mitigation shall be provided in order to meet the Township's goal that all signalized intersections and the bridges leading to the island operate at a Level of Service C or better during the peak hours of the day. Unsignalized intersections should operate at Level of Service D or better.
(2) 
The mitigation measures may include items such as, but not limited to:
(a) 
Roadway paving or repaving.
(b) 
Roadway widening to increase lane width or add additional lanes.
(c) 
Change to road intersection alignment or lane configuration.
(d) 
Bypass lanes, left turn lanes or deceleration tapers/lanes.
(e) 
Changes to traffic control/signalization.
(f) 
Relocation change in design, or reduction in number of access points.
(g) 
Reduction in the proposed density or intensity of use.
(3) 
Sketches should be provided of suggested mitigation. Any alternatives or suggested phasing of improvements should be described and illustrated. The responsibility and timing of roadway improvements shall be described.
(4) 
Proposed mitigation measures shall be provided to the Wayne County Department of Public Services for review and comment prior to approval of the traffic analysis. Any mitigation that involves changes to optimize signal timing must demonstrate that such changes will benefit the overall operations and will be acceptable to the Wayne County Department of Public Services.
P. 
Joint transportation impact studies. A single transportation impact study may be submitted by two or more applicants where both applicants submit plans (rezoning, site or subdivision) for sites adjacent or in close proximity to one another. The transportation impact study shall conform to all of the requirements of this section, including an analysis of both sites and all impacted bridges, and intersections. The transportation impact study shall document the cumulative impact of both developments.
The following information is required for community impact statements:
A. 
Existing site conditions. Illustrations and a narrative shall be provided that describe the characteristics of the site and adjacent right-of-way. This description should include surrounding land uses, expected development in the vicinity which could influence future utility capacity, special site features and a description of any committed infrastructure improvements.
B. 
Proposed development. The applicant shall prepare a description of the proposed development with an enumeration of the square footage for nonresidential and number of each unit-type for residential development. Residential equivalent unit figures shall be provided for water for the new development. The proposed utility system to be constructed as part of the development shall be detailed on the site plan or subdivision plat.
C. 
Wastewater systems. The study shall demonstrate that the proposed development will be served by adequate public sanitary sewerage. The public sewerage system shall be considered adequate if there is sufficient unreserved or uncommitted available capacity to accommodate expected and ultimate peak flows from the proposed development, and any necessary improvements shall be constructed and on-line prior to completion of the development. The analysis of the capacity of the public sewerage system shall consider the following:
(1) 
The sewer system's design capacity.
(2) 
The sewer system's available capacity.
(3) 
The projected wastewater flow to be generated by proposed new development.
(4) 
The impact of other proposed projects on the sewer system's available capacity.
(5) 
Projects appearing in the Township's Capital Improvements Program that will affect the ability of the sewer system to serve new development.
(6) 
Other variables found to have an effect on the ability of the sewer system to accept the projected wastewater flow from new development.
(7) 
The sewer system shall be adequate to serve the development. All lots shall tie into an appropriately sized collector main and shall not tie directly into an interceptor.
D. 
Water systems. The study shall demonstrate that the proposed development will be served by adequate public water. The public water system shall be considered adequate if the source facilities, storage tanks, pumping stations and distribution systems have sufficient unreserved or uncommitted capacity available to provide the pressure and flow required in addition to minimum fire suppression flow for the proposed development, and any necessary improvements shall be constructed and on-line prior to completion of the development. The analysis of the capacity of the public sewage system shall consider the following:
(1) 
The water system's design capacity.
(2) 
The water system's supply source.
(3) 
The water system's available capacity.
(4) 
The projected water needs of proposed new development to include needs for domestic consumption and fire protection.
(5) 
Adequacy of the proposed system design to provide pressure, flow and fire suppression, including required looping of water mains.
(6) 
Existing storage, treatment, and pumping facilities affected by the proposed development.
(7) 
The impact of other proposed projects on the water system's available capacity.
(8) 
Projects appearing in the Township's Capital Improvements Program that will affect the ability of the water system to serve new development.
(9) 
Other variables found to have an effect on the ability of the water system to satisfy the projected water needs of the new development.
E. 
Stormwater Management. The study shall demonstrate that the proposed development will provide adequate stormwater management in accordance with Chapter 233, Stormwater Management. The stormwater management plan shall be considered adequate if the development is designed, constructed, and maintained to control runoff, prevent flooding and protect water quality. The analysis of the stormwater management shall consider the following:
(1) 
Prevention of increased runoff, flood hazards, water pollution related to stormwater runoff, soil erosion, channel erosion and impact to downstream properties.
(2) 
Prevention of impact to wetlands, watercourses or fish and wildlife habitat.
(3) 
Stormwater best management practices to decrease runoff velocity, allow for natural infiltration and passive storage, allow suspended sediment particles to settle, and to remove pollutants.
(4) 
Controlled release of stormwater in accordance with the Wayne County design standards and Chapter 233, Stormwater Management.
(5) 
Stormwater facilities near the Grosse Ile Airport shall not create an increased bird-aircraft strike hazard.
F. 
Other utilities. Information shall be provided regarding other utilities that will be provided to the site, including electricity, gas and telecommunications. Documentation shall be provided that there is sufficient electrical capacity to serve the development without impacting existing uses during peak demand periods.
G. 
Schools. The study shall demonstrate that there is adequate school capacity to support the number of dwelling units and that the capacity of public schools will not be adversely affected by residential development. School capacity will consider current and projected enrollments, capacities of individual schools and capacity at each grade level.
H. 
Recreation. For any residential development, the study shall demonstrate that there is adequate open space and recreation facilities to serve the number of dwelling units proposed. All residential developments shall include neighborhood open space as required by Chapter 238, Subdivision Control.
I. 
Community character. The study shall demonstrate compatibility with surrounding land uses and adherence to development standards, including landscaping requirements, in accordance with Chapter 285, Zoning. The study shall also demonstrate consistency with the sustainable island character of the Township, as articulated in the Township Master Plan.
J. 
Environment. The study shall demonstrate that the proposed development will minimize impact to the environmental conditions of the Township, through incorporation of an environmental assessment prepared in accordance with Chapter 98, Environmental Assessment.
K. 
Township standards. All utilities shall be designed to meet the requirements of Chapter 210, Sewer Use, Chapter 238, Subdivision Control, Chapter 258, Utilities, and other applicable Township engineering standards. Utilities shall be designed and installed with proper access for maintenance by the Township.
L. 
Phased developments. Where a development is to be constructed in phases, a phasing plan shall be provided that indicates the improvements to be completed with each phase. Each phase of a development shall have all necessary infrastructure installed to fully operate independently in accordance with the Township engineering requirements, regardless of whether future phases are constructed.
The following information is required for fiscal impact studies:
A. 
Existing capita estimate of service costs. The applicant shall determine existing capita estimate of service costs based upon the most recent budget provided by the Township. Budgets shall be disaggregated into categories of service expenditure for general government administration; public services; police; fire; and recreation. Costs shall be allocated to residential and nonresidential land uses based upon existing Township population and employment. Residentially associated costs will be divided by total population to derive a per capita estimate of service costs. Nonresidential costs will be divided by local employees for a per employee estimate of nonresidential service costs.
B. 
Existing revenues. Existing revenues will be outlined based upon the most recent budget provided by the Township. Budgets will be disaggregated into categories of revenue including permit fees, property taxes, and intergovernmental revenue. Revenues will be allocated to residential and nonresidential uses, and estimated revenues associated with residential and nonresidential land uses.
C. 
Fiscal impact. The applicant shall determine fiscal impact associated with the development.
(1) 
The applicant shall outline population and employment changes associated with the development.
(2) 
The applicant shall determine infrastructure needs and costs associated with the development. This shall identify infrastructure facilities needed to accommodate the development and project the costs of needed infrastructure improvements.
(3) 
Total costs to serve the development shall be calculated. Residentially induced costs associated with development shall be calculated by multiplying the per capita estimate of current service costs from Subsection A above by the population increase of the proposed development. Nonresidential costs associated with development shall be calculated by multiplying the per employee estimate of service costs by the employment increase associated with the development. Annual debt service costs shall also be calculated.
(4) 
Property taxes, state revenue sharing, utility fees, permit fees and other revenues associated with the development shall be estimated.
(5) 
Estimated revenues and costs shall be compared to determine net fiscal impact on the Township.
D. 
Marginal costs. The analysis shall also identify any marginal costs associated with the development. This shall consider surplus capacity in existing facilities and the point at which new development will require major expansion to infrastructure and facilities, thereby making the marginal cost of serving the development higher than the average per capita cost.
The person(s) responsible for the preparation of the impact studies shall have a degree or specific professional training in the preparation of infrastructure and transportation impact studies.
A. 
The transportation impact assessment/statement preparer shall have experience in the preparation of transportation impact studies, experience and familiarity with the Highway Capacity Manual and other traffic operation evaluation techniques and be one or more of the following: registered engineer (PE), professional traffic operations engineer (PTOE) or professional transportation planner (PTP). Any study involving roadway or traffic signal design work shall be prepared by or under the supervision of a registered engineer (PE) with specific training in transportation engineering.
B. 
The community impact statement shall be prepared by a registered engineer (PE) with experience in design and construction of utility systems.
C. 
The fiscal impact statement preparer shall have demonstrated experience with accounting, financial analysis, municipal administration or fiscal analysis.
A. 
Preapplication. The applicant shall meet with the Planning Commission at a regularly scheduled meeting prior to completing the impact statement. The purpose of this meeting is to allow the applicant to present the scope of the proposed development and receive comments or direction from the Planning Commission on the scope of the impact study to fully evaluate the impacts of the development. No formal action shall be taken.
B. 
Review requirement. The impact statement shall be reviewed concurrently with a development application. The procedures for development reviews are set forth in the Chapter 285, Zoning, Chapter 71, Condominium Projects, and Chapter 238, Subdivision Control.
(1) 
The impact statement shall be submitted prior to Planning Commission approval of any site plan.
(2) 
For special land uses and rezoning, the impact statement shall be submitted prior to Planning Commission public hearing.
(3) 
For subdivisions and condominiums, the impact statement shall be submitted prior to Planning Commission review of the preliminary plat or condominium site plan.
C. 
Submittal. The impact statement shall be submitted along with the environmental assessment required under Chapter 98, Environmental Assessment.
(1) 
Six copies of the impact statement shall be provided to the Community Development Department, which shall forward the impact statement to following Township departments for review:
(a) 
Department of Public Services.
(b) 
Fire Department.
(c) 
Police Department.
(d) 
Township Engineer.
(e) 
Township Planner.
(2) 
A copy of the impact statement shall also be submitted by the applicant to the Wayne County Department of Public Services, with the Township copied on the transmittal.
D. 
Revisions. If the Departments listed in Subsection C above determine there are deficiencies in the impact statement, a report of the deficiencies shall be provided to the applicant and the applicant shall be required to revise and resubmit the impact statement. Any impact statement with noted deficiencies will not be rereviewed until all elements have been addressed. All partial resubmittals will be rejected. Any deficiencies identified by the Wayne County Department of Public Services must also be addressed.
E. 
Department recommendations. Upon determining that the impact statement is complete, all of the review departments shall provide comments on the impact statement prior to any consideration of the proposed development.
F. 
Public Service Commission. The applicant shall submit 10 copies of the impact statement, reflecting any revisions required by Township departments, for review by the Public Service Commission along with associated site plans or subdivision plats. The Public Service Commission shall make a recommendation to the Planning Commission on the impact statement along with any comments on the site plan or subdivision application. A recommendation by the Public Service Commission shall not constitute approval of construction plans. Subsequent approvals shall be required later in the development process for detailed engineering plans, inspections, as-builts and acceptance of utilities.
G. 
Planning Commission. The applicant shall submit 10 copies of the impact statement, reflecting any revisions required by the Public Service Commission, for review by the Planning Commission along with associated site plans or subdivision plats. For site plans requiring approval by the Planning Commission, the Planning Commission shall approve or deny the impact statement based upon the recommendation of the Public Service Commission and Township departments and compliance with the requirements of this chapter. For rezonings, condominiums and preliminary subdivision plats requiring approval by the Township Board, the Planning Commission shall make a recommendation to the Township Board.
H. 
Township Board. For rezonings, condominiums and preliminary subdivision plats requiring approval by the Township Board, the applicant shall submit 10 copies of the impact statement, reflecting any revisions required by the Public Service Commission and the Planning Commission. The Township Board shall approve or deny the impact statement based upon the recommendation of the Public Service Commission, Planning Commission, Township departments and compliance with the requirements of this Chapter.
I. 
Approval consideration. In approving a development, the Planning Commission and Township Board shall evaluate the project in terms of the impacts it may have on the community's environment, socio-economic conditions, infrastructure, transportation network and fiscal conditions of the Township. Depending on the significance of the impact in each of these areas, the Planning Commission and Township Board can decide to approve the project, reject the project, or modify plans for development in such a way that impacts can be mitigated. Alternatives and project modifications shall consider measures that will mitigate the various impacts, including infrastructure improvements, scaling down the size of the project or finding a more appropriate location for the project. Performance guarantees for infrastructure improvements shall be as required by Section 285-20.5 of the Zoning Chapter and § 238-11 of the Subdivision Control Chapter.
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