City of Parkville, MO
Platte County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Adopted by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Parkville 2-7-2017 by Ord. No. 2884. Amendments noted where applicable.]
A. 
Intent. The intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Plan and coordinate street networks to ensure the proper arrangement of blocks and lots for long-range development goals.
2. 
Increase connectivity, improve options for access in the community, and allow greater variety of street designs on different street segments.
3. 
Provide for efficient and safe movement of all potential users of the streets, including pedestrians, bicycles, automobiles, and trucks or transit, and balance street designs so the interests of a single mode does not compromise other modes.
4. 
Emphasize street design as a key determinant of community character and design of the public realm, as identified in the Master Plan and other specific plans.
5. 
Use streetscape design to call attention to differing contexts, including opportunities to implement green infrastructure policies.
B. 
Applicability. The standards in this Section apply to:
1. 
All land division platting new streets.
2. 
Any land division or platting along an existing street, where a specific street type has been approved.
3. 
Any land division of more than five (5) acres where internal access streets may be proposed or that abuts existing streets.
C. 
Network And Connectivity. Arterial, collector and local streets shall generally be laid out according to the policies of the Master Plan in a manner that follows terrain, minimizes impact on the environment, limits dead-end streets, and provides non-vehicular networks where connectivity is not possible.
1. 
Block Sizes. Except where more specific guidance is provided by detailed plans, streets shall generally be laid out to provide a network of blocks and streets based on the planning context and development pattern as identified in Table 404-1:
Table 404-1: Block Sizes
Planning Context
Block Length
(feet)
Block Area
(acres)
Cul-De-Sac Limits
(feet)
Walkable/Compact: downtown, core areas of commercial centers, and abutting blocks adjacent to walkable places
250 minimum;
500 maximum
2.5 to 5
Prohibited
General: traditional neighborhoods, near downtown areas, and areas supporting commercial corridors
350 minimum;
800 maximum
4 to 8
250 maximum
Suburban: areas more removed from walkable centers, commercial corridors or large-scale projects arranged around a campus plan
500 minimum;
1,000 maximum
5 to 8
500 maximum
2. 
External Connections. Street network plans shall provide for the continuation of streets in adjacent subdivisions and to future growth areas at intervals that meet these standards and shall be constructed to the subdivision boundary.
3. 
Exceptions. The following are exceptions to the block and connectivity standards:
a. 
Natural Features And Civic Spaces. Blocks or parcels abutting or containing important natural features, topographical constraints or otherwise creating parts of the open and civic space system may be larger, provided that the proposed street layout preserves these features and integrates them into the overall structure of the community.
b. 
Regional Transportation Routes. Blocks or parcels abutting intervening regional transportation routes such as highways or rail rights-of-way may be larger, provided that street layouts and development patterns achieve local connectivity in all other ways possible.
c. 
Rural Parcels. Tracts divided into larger or rural lots of at least five (5) acres may exceed block limits, provided that development is arranged to allow future streets in compliance with these regulations, and a logical pattern of resubdivision can occur with minimal disruption of buildings, utilities, and other structures.
d. 
Oversized Parcels. Where oversized parcels are platted for special land uses or development projects that involve large-scale buildings and patterns, such as campuses or large-scale employment areas, platted blocks may be larger, provided that internal access streets mimic the block structure and urban design amenity of these standards, and create logical extensions and connectivity to the public streetscapes.
4. 
Dead-End Streets. In any case where streets are not required to connect by these standards, dead-end streets shall be limited as specified in Table 404-1. Turnaround shall be required with a back of curb radius of at least thirty-nine (39) feet. Alternative designs such as loops or closes are preferred over dead ends and culs-de-sac.
5. 
Walkways And Passages. In any case where exceptions for larger blocks apply, or any other area where substantial pedestrian traffic may occur, such as adjacent to schools, the Planning Commission or Board of Alderman may require pedestrian walkways through blocks or at any dead-end streets. In general, any block longer than seven hundred fifty (750) feet should be considered for additional walkways and passages.
D. 
Street Design. Streets shall be designed to reinforce the character of the area and the anticipated development patterns, land uses and designs of projects fronting the street.
1. 
Street Design Types. Each functional classification may use the following street design types so that urban design features and streetscape design better support the development context and character of the area. Table 404-2 identifies which design types are most appropriate for different contexts and different functional classes of streets.
Table 404-2: Street Design Types and Functional Classification
Street Type
Arterial
(A)
Collector
(C)
Local
(L)
Standard
A basic street type appropriate generally where no particular development characteristics or urban design context warrant application of other street types
Activity
A pedestrian-oriented street type appropriate for all areas where walkability is a goal. It is characterized by narrow lanes, slow speeds, on-street parking, and large, well-designed pedestrian amenity zones that support businesses and economic activity along these streets.
Neighborhood
A community-oriented street type appropriate where a higher level of neighborhood design amenity and neighborhood walkability is desired. It is characterized by large street trees, sidewalks, slow speeds, and occasional on-street parking.
Natural
A green street type appropriate where streets cross or align with natural features, particularly to emphasize the open space and environmental themes of a particular context. It is characterized by slow to moderate speeds, and informal and natural landscape edges, and the incorporation of trails or other open spaces.
Preferred type
Limited type, based on street network plan and surrounding development context and natural characteristics
2. 
Context Appropriate Street Design Standards. The context appropriate street design standards in Appendix A[1] provide a framework for assembling cross sections for each specific street type. The standards and guidelines in Appendix A shall be used to create specific cross sections for a specific context, or to adjust the typical street cross sections provided in this Section.
[1]
Editor's Note: Appendix A is included as an attachment to this Title.
E. 
Intersection Design.
 
Figure 303-1 Corner Radii Comparison
Two (2) curbs with differing radii, ten (10) feet and thirty (30) feet, overlap with a red shaded area highlighting the difference in vehicular space, pedestrian space and crossing distances
1. 
Corner Radii. Corner radii of intersections shall be the minimum amount necessary to balance the competing interest of vehicle turning movements and the distance and safety of pedestrians crossing the street, based on the specific context. Table 404-3 establishes the base requirements. In areas where large vehicles will make frequent turning movements, the Commission may require greater turning radius. In areas where slower speeds are desired or walkability is important the Commission may require tighter corner radii.
 
Figure 303-2 Corner Radii Measurement
The figure demonstrates the typical method for measuring a corner radius at the intersection.
Table 404-3: Corner Curb Radius
Intersection Type
Curb Radius
(feet)
Local/Local
5 to 15
Local/Collector
10 to 20
Local/Arterial
15 to 20
Collector/Collector
10 to 20
Collector/Arterial
20 to 30
Arterial/Arterial
25 to 30
2. 
Sight Distances. Proper lines of sight shall be maintained at all intersections. The proper line of sight shall be an unobstructed view from the stopping point on the approaching street to all points three (3) feet above the roadway along the center line of the intersecting street. The distance of the unobstructed view shall be based upon the design speed of the intersection street, specified in Table 404-5.
 
Figure 303-4 Clear Sight Distance
A clear line of sight must be maintained at a specific distance depending on the design speed of the roadway, and the stop point and control type on the intersection. This grants drivers appropriate warning on incoming vehicles.
Table 404-4: Clear Sight Distance
Design Speed of Intersection Street
(miles per hour)
Intersection Sight Distance
(measured along center line of intersecting street)
(feet)
15
105
20
125
25
150
30
200
35
225 to 250
40
275 to 325
45
325 to 400
Source: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets.
a. 
Street trees, light poles or other limited obstructions are allowed within the sight triangle, provided that they do not have any foliage, limbs, or other obstructions between two (2) and eight (8) feet, and are no closer than twenty (20) feet to the intersecting right-of-way line.
b. 
Fully controlled intersections, where signalization establishes and prioritizes safe turning movements, may deviate from the above sight triangle standards if site conditions warrant and based upon a recommendation of the Public Works Director.
A. 
Intent. The intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Emphasize open space as an important part of community character and design of the public realm, as identified in the Master Plan and specific plans.
2. 
Plan and integrate park, civic and open spaces as an extension of street networks, shaping important public and civic spaces.
3. 
Value the design, function, and appropriate application of different types of open space, rather than solely the quantity of space.
4. 
Promote different types of open spaces appropriate to the development context, recognizing the different ecological, recreation, aesthetic and urban design functions of these spaces.
5. 
Integrate natural systems into the design of common or public open spaces, and use major natural features to create distinct places.
6. 
Locate civic and open spaces within easy walking distance of the people they intend to serve, and design them in a manner to encourage social interaction.
B. 
Applicability.
1. 
Generally. These standards apply to all divisions of land or platting involving more than five (5) acres. All platted lots shall have access to one (1) or more of the open and civic space types in this Section, within the specified service area. The open space requirement is in addition to any landscape, setback, or buffer requirements in this code; however effective site design can allow areas to meet multiple standards.
2. 
Exceptions. Any lot platted within the applicable service area for any existing open and civic space types below does not require any new open spaces, provided that:
a. 
It is public; or
b. 
It is private or common and the property owner has a right to access this property through easements, covenants or other formal documentation of the entity with ownership and control of the space.
C. 
Open Space Types. Table 404-5 indicates the types of open spaces that are eligible for each particular area based on context. Standards and specifications for each open space type are provided in Subsection (F).
Table 404-5: Civic and Open Space Types and Context
Planning Context
Natural Area
Park
Trail/Greenway
Green
Square
Plaza/ Courtyard
Pedestrian Enhanced Streetscape
Walkable/Compact: downtown, core areas of commercial centers, and abutting blocks adjacent to walkable places
General: traditional neighborhoods, near downtown areas, and areas supporting commercial corridors
Suburban: areas more removed from walkable centers, commercial corridors or large-scale projects arranged around a campus plan
Preferred type
Limited type, based on opportunities corresponding with the context or more specific plan
D. 
Required Open Space.
1. 
The amount of space required shall be based on the base zoning district(s) proposed or existing for the project and based on Table 404-6.
Table 404-6: Required Open Space
Zoning District
Amount Required
R-1
5%
R-2, R-3, R-4
10%
R-5
15%
OTD, B-1
5%
P-EC, B-2, B-4
12%
B-P
20%
I-1, I-2, I-3, U-1
N/A, required buffers and screening addresses open space
PLCD
N/A, open and civic space is primary use
2. 
The amounts required in Table 404-6 may be reduced:
a. 
Based on a plan through the planned development process that meets or exceeds the intent of this Section;
b. 
To the point where any lesser percentage of open space will clearly meet both the service area and level of service targets identified in Subsection (F) below; or
c. 
For any application that dedicates open space to the public in a type, location and design standard that is acceptable to meet general public needs based on Subsection (H).
E. 
Location Criteria. The following location criteria shall be used in determining the most appropriate locations and characteristics of land to be designated as required open and civic space systems.
1. 
Visibility. Priority should be given to areas that provide the most visible impact, and to locations that provide relationships to civic and open space systems on adjacent property and future development sites.
a. 
Formal open spaces (greens, squares, or plazas) should be located at prominent focal points within a subdivision or development site, and included in or designed as an effective extension of the public rights-of-way, or other common areas.
b. 
Natural open space (natural areas, trails/greenways, or parks) should be located along prominent ridges, valleys and view corridors or areas where other natural features such as significant vegetation or water features exist.
2. 
Function. Open space shall be located in areas that maximize the intended function.
a. 
Formal open space shall be centered in areas that will have the greatest population density, activity or development intensity in order to provide the greatest pedestrian accessibility.
b. 
Natural open space shall be located in areas where the ecological, aesthetic, and recreational impact will be the greatest.
F. 
Design Standards. Civic and open space shall be designed according to the specific type, and the standards below for each different type.
1. 
Natural Area.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Size. The size, location, and design of natural areas shall be dependent on the planning context, the presence of natural amenities and ecological functions worthy of protection, and the ability of the designated area to provide significant continuity with nearby natural features. In general, these areas should provide the opportunity to coordinate with at least 5 acres of contiguous preserved area; and ideally up to 40 or more acres. However, the actual sizes of specific components of natural areas shall be dependent on environmental and aesthetic benefits and importance to larger-scale natural systems.
Service Area: N/A
Level of Service: 12 acres per 1,000 people
b. 
Design Elements. Natural areas include any area of existing or restored open lands, such as riparian corridors, flood hazard areas, unique geological formations, important habitats, significant plant types or substantial groupings of important plant types, wetlands, etc. The goal is to protect the edges of these areas to maximize intact areas that provide valuable ecosystem services for the community, support preservation goals or enhance the aesthetics and amenities of the area.
2. 
Park.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Size:
0.25 to 1 acre (mini-park)
0.25 to 10 acres, 5+ acres ideal (neighborhood)
10 to 50 acres; 10+ acres ideal (community)
50 acres minimum for passive uses or structured recreation fields or regional
Service Area:
1/4 to 1/2 mile (neighborhood)
1/2 mile to 3 miles depending on size (community)
Level of Service: 12 acres per 1,000 people
Note: Public dedication and acceptance of parks is dependent on other parameters of the Parkville Park Master Plan.
b. 
Design Elements.
(1) 
Parks shall generally be at least three hundred (300) feet wide in all directions, except that mini-parks may be as narrow as one hundred (100) feet.
(2) 
One (1) large tree for every forty (40) feet of street frontage to relate the park to the public realm, plus other landscape to support the overall park design.
(3) 
Between fifteen percent (15%) and fifty percent (50%) of the area should be allocated to structured recreation, such as ball fields, playgrounds or sport courts. The remainder of the area should be allocated to ground cover, treed areas, garden, lawns or other landscape amenity.
3. 
Trail/Greenway.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Size:
20 feet minimum width; 30 feet+ ideal, but dependent on topography and natural features
Trails/greenways shall be located to provide continuity through the area, with connections to other supporting facilities and the ability to link important destinations for those on foot or on bicycle, such as parks, schools and community centers or other civic destinations.
Service Area: 1/8 mile, or 1/4 mile from access point
Level of Service: 12 acres per 1,000 people
Note: Public dedication and acceptance of a trail/greenway is dependent on other parameters of the Parkville Parks Master Plan.
b. 
Design Elements.
(1) 
Trails/greenways should include a paved or otherwise dust-free stabilized surface at least eight (8) feet minimum width; ten (10) feet minimum if shared bike/pedestrian trail.
(2) 
The landscape area on each side of the trail should be at least six (6) feet, and wider in places to incorporate natural features or significant vegetation.
(3) 
One (1) large tree for every forty (40) feet of trail length; and one (1) large or small tree for every twenty-five (25) feet of trail length.
(4) 
Trails/greenways located along rights-of-way may be designed and incorporated into the street cross section design to create the optimal multi-modal design for the street and trail.
4. 
Green.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Size: 1/2 to 3 acres
Service Area: 2,000 feet
Level of Service: 5% to 10% of non-right-of-way land area; or 2 acres per 1,000 people
b. 
Design Elements.
(1) 
Greens shall be at least one hundred (100) feet wide in all directions, and should have an enclosure ratio (width of space to height of buildings) for buildings on the green between four to one (4:1) and two to one (2:1).
(2) 
Greens should have a public street along at least two (2) sides with direct pedestrian access to the street.
(3) 
Buildings fronting on the green should be designed with frequent entrances and outdoor seating areas to activate the space.
(4) 
One large tree for every twenty-five (25) feet of street frontage; and one (1) large or small tree for every two thousand (2,000) square feet.
(5) 
At least ten percent (10%) of the area shall be designed for formal gathering such as seating areas and other areas of concentrated amenity that serve as a focal point of the green.
(6) 
At least seventy percent (70%) of the area shall be allocated to ground cover, treed areas or other landscape amenity.
5. 
Square.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Size: 5,000 square feet to 1 acre
Service Area: 1,000 feet
Level of Service: 5% to 10% of non-right-of-way land area; or 1 to 2 acres per 1,000 people
b. 
Design Elements.
(1) 
Squares shall be at least seventy (70) feet wide in all directions, and should have an enclosure ratio (width of space to height of buildings) for buildings on the square between three to one (3:1) and one to one (1:1).
(2) 
Squares should have a public street along all sides and be designed as a focal point for abutting blocks; streets should be designed for multi-modal transportation with direct pedestrian access to the street.
(3) 
One (1) large tree for every forty (40) feet of street frontage; and one (1) large or small tree for every one thousand (1,000) square feet.
(4) 
At least fifty percent (50%) of the area shall be designed for formal gathering such as seating areas and other concentrated amenity.
(5) 
At least twenty-five percent (25%) of the area shall be allocated to planter beds, seasonal plantings, foundation plants, garden, lawns or other landscape amenity.
6. 
Plaza/Courtyard.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Size: 500 square feet to 5,000 square feet
Service Area: On block or immediately abutting blocks
Level of Service: 5% to 10% of non-right-of-way land area; or 1/2 to 1 acres per 1,000 people
b. 
Design Elements.
(1) 
Plazas/courtyards shall be at least twenty (20) feet wide in all directions, and should have an enclosure ratio (width of space to height of buildings) for buildings on the plaza/courtyard between two to one (2:1) and one to two (1:2).
(2) 
Plazas/courtyards should have a public street along at least one (1) side; streets should be designed for multi-modal transportation with direct pedestrian access between the plaza/courtyard and the street.
(3) 
Plazas/courtyards should include seating, art, formal landscape and other amenities and ornamentation as a focal point for gathering places.
(4) 
Buildings fronting on the plaza/courtyard should be designed as street front buildings with frequent windows and entrances to activate the space.
(5) 
One (1) large tree for every forty (40) feet of street frontage; and one (1) large or small tree for every one thousand (1,000) square feet.
(6) 
At least twenty percent (20%) of the area shall be allocated to planter beds, seasonal plantings or foundation plants.
7. 
Enhanced Pedestrian Frontage.
a. 
Size; Service Area; Level Of Service.
Enhanced pedestrian streetscapes are an area along the street frontage that may be common or dedicated to the public as part of the right-of-way standards. It includes pedestrian enhancements beyond those required by the street type standards to support buildings fronting directly on the streetscape.
Size: 8 feet to 10 feet along the frontage, designed as an extension of the streetscape. Any street designed with sidewalks 16 feet or wider can count this area towards the 8-foot requirement.
Service Area: on block or immediately abutting lots
Level of Service: N/A
b. 
Design Elements.
(1) 
Buildings shall provide direct pedestrian access to enhanced pedestrian streetscape.
(2) 
One (1) small tree for every twenty-five (25) feet or one (1) large shade tree for every forty (40) feet; plus ornamental planting in conjunction with the overall streetscape design, particularly at building entrances. (Street trees planted in the right-of-way per street types specification may count to this requirement.)
(3) 
Outside seating should be provided, either through seating areas associated with the building use or through street furniture or other type of street amenity designed for pedestrian use.
(4) 
Facades fronting on the streetscape should have high permeability with frequent windows and entrances to activate the space.
G. 
Ownership And Management.
1. 
Required civic open space shall be designated on the final plat as a separate tract. Options for ownership and management of preserved area include:
a. 
Creation of or dedication to a non-profit entity capable of carrying out the ownership and management.
b. 
Creation of a homeowners' and/or leaseholders' association that owns it in common capable of carrying out the ownership and management.
c. 
Dedication to a public entity as part of the rights-or-way, parks or other community facilities element of the plan.
2. 
All civic and open space shall require documentation recorded with the final plat that demonstrates the ongoing maintenance, administrative and financial management of the space according to these standards. Dedication to the City or other public entity is subject to acceptance by and at the sole discretion of the City or other public entity.
H. 
Parkland Dedication.
1. 
Dedication. Subdivision plats shall show dedication of land for park uses at locations designated in the Comprehensive Plan, or the official parks plan adopted by the Board of Aldermen, or as otherwise determined through the plat review process and applying the open and civic space standards in this Section. When the required dedication is less than four (4) acres, the Board may require the open space to be located at a suitable place at the periphery of the subdivision so a more usable tract will result when additional open space is obtained when adjacent land is subdivided. In all cases, the developer will dedicate such approved parkland to the City of Parkville as a condition of final subdivision approval, and shown on an approved final plat as "dedicated to Parkville, Missouri for park and recreation purposes."
2. 
Required Area. The required area of the dedication shall be based on the number of dwelling units and the acres per person formula as follows:
a. 
Detached Houses. Number of units times three and seven-tenths (3.7) persons per unit times six thousandths (0.006) acre.
b. 
Duplexes. Number of units times three (3) persons per unit times six thousandths (0.006) acre.
c. 
Multi-Unit Buildings. Number of units times two (2) persons per unit times six thousandths (0.006) acre.
3. 
Cash In Lieu Of Land Dedication.
a. 
If the applicant and the Board are unable to agree upon the location of the land to be dedicated, then as a condition of final subdivision approval, the Board may choose to accept payment of cash in lieu of parkland.
b. 
If the required dedication is less than two (2) acres, then the City, at its option elected at any time prior to the approval of the preliminary plat as a condition, or the applicant, prior to approval of final plat, may choose to accept payment of cash in lieu of parkland.
c. 
When the payment of cash in lieu of dedicating open space is approved, the applicant shall deposit with the City Treasurer a cash payment without recourse or the right of recovery prior to recording the subdivision plat. The amount shall be the required dedication multiplied by seven thousand dollars ($7,000.00) per acre, less a credit for any land actually dedicated for park purposes. The funds shall be used for the acquisition, development or improvement of a public park as determined solely by the Board.
4. 
Private Development And Operation Of Park-Recreational Open Space. The applicant may comply with the requirements of this Subsection by providing an area equal to or greater than the required area as private open space meeting the standards and criteria of this Section 404.020, including legal review of the ownership and management arrangements of 404.020(G).
5. 
Additional Recreational Reservations. The provisions of this Section are minimum standards. None of the subsections above shall be construed as prohibiting a developer from dedicating or reserving other land for recreation purposes in addition to the requirements of this Section.
A. 
Intent. The intent of this Section is to:
1. 
Ensure the proper arrangement of blocks and lots within the structure of the street network and civic and open space systems.
2. 
Arrange development in a manner that is least disruptive to existing topography and capitalize on inherent characteristics of the land as defining features.
3. 
Coordinate access and utilities for each lot in association with larger systems of streets and infrastructure.
4. 
Promote appropriate site and building designs in relation to the public realm.
5. 
Ensure that all lots are buildable lots according to this code.
B. 
Applicability. The standards in this Section apply to any division of land or platting involving new blocks or lot, to the extent the division impacts any of the standards.
C. 
Block Arrangement. In general, all blocks shall be arranged to have two (2) tiers of lots, each fronting on a public street. Double-frontage lots or lots backing to streets are generally prohibited, unless dictated by overriding development patterns outside of the control or impact of the project, such as intervening natural features, parcels platted parts of the civic and open space systems, or other exceptions noted in the connectivity standards in Section 404.010(C).
1. 
Access And Frontages. The street network, street designs and block arrangements shall be coordinated to promote the connectivity and public realm design goals of each particular context.
a. 
Blocks shall be laid out so that each lot has access to the street network.
b. 
In order to preserve the design of specific street design types, lot access should be coordinated at the block level.
c. 
When individual lots may have limited access due to broader streetscape and urban design goals, alternative strategies, such as alleys, internal access streets, shared drives or limited drives with access to interior portions of the block or lot, should be used.
2. 
Utility Easements. All blocks shall include easements for all required improvements necessary to serve each lot, granted to the City or appropriate utility.
a. 
Where alleys are not provided, easements at least five (5) feet wide shall be platted at the rear of all lot lines, and where necessary on the side lot lines.
b. 
Larger widths may be required or easements not along lot lines may be necessary for the extensions of main sewers or other utilities.
c. 
All easements shall be accessible from the public right-of-way in some manner for each block.
3. 
Drainage. Storm drainage should be designed at the largest scale possible in order to avoid site-by-site treatment. Blocks and streets shall conform to existing topography as nearly as possible to reduce drainage problems.
a. 
Integrating stormwater systems into development patterns using street designs and open spaces that serve dual purposes is a priority.
b. 
Where any stream or surface drainage or watercourse is necessary, easements shall be granted to the City preserving their stormwater function.
c. 
The City may require installation of pipe, masonry or riprap, flumes or inlets, or other such protective devices.
d. 
At the site level, infiltrating stormwater through best management practices is preferred to detention.
e. 
All plats and easements shall designate maintenance of the stormwater system, which may be private or City, dependent on each particular application.
4. 
Monuments. Monuments shall be placed at block corners, point of curves, change in direction along lot lines and at each lot corner in accordance with specifications of the City Director of Public Works.
D. 
Lot Arrangement. All lots shall result in buildable sites considering the topography, surrounding character, proposed land uses, and development standards applicable to the lot.
1. 
Size. The width and area of all lots shall comply with the requirements of the zoning district in which they are located. Any lot not served by public sanitary sewer shall be of sufficient additional area to properly accommodate a suitable private sewage disposal device. The City Planning Commission will determine the required lot size upon report of appropriate tests and adequate determination and recommendation of the County Health Officer or State Board of Health.
2. 
Corner Lots. Corner lots should have extra width sufficient to permit the establishment of front building lines on both adjoining streets, or to permit other building arrangements that support the proper relation of the building and site to the adjoining streets.
3. 
Lot Access And Frontages. Lot access shall be limited by the specific street type, and the access guidance provided for each street. Access for any street may be further modified by any specific access management study. Where access is limited by these standards and guidelines, alternative access through shared drives, internal access lanes, or alleys shall be considered. Double-frontage and reverse-frontage lots shall be avoided except where their use will produce definite advantages in meeting special situations identified in the arrangement of blocks and development patterns.
4. 
Lot Lines. Generally the side lines shall be at right angles to straight street lines or radial to curved street lines, except where a variation of this rule will provide a better street and lot layout to accommodate topography and overriding characteristics of the development pattern.
5. 
Building Lines. Building lines conforming to zoning regulations shall be shown on all lots within the platted area.
A. 
Intent. The intent of this Section is to ensure that all improvements necessary to serve lots within a subdivision are constructed, inspected, or otherwise assured of completion prior to the issuance of building permits.
1. 
Coordinate the design and construction of infrastructure for lots and projects with surrounding systems.
2. 
Promote specifications and installation of infrastructure that supports planning and urban design policies for the City and specific areas.
3. 
Ensure that all lots are served with necessary improvements prior to or in association with the issuance of building permits.
B. 
Applicability. The standards in this Section apply to any division of land or platting involving new blocks or lot, to the extent the division impacts any of the standards.
C. 
Generally. The 1997 or the latest consecutive edition of the American Public Works Association (APWA) Standard Specifications and Design Criteria shall be the governing specifications and design criteria for the City of Parkville, which may be supplemented by the Director of Public Works policy statements. However, where any of the planning and urban design standards in this Chapter require or recommend a different physical arrangement of spaces, the construction and the engineering specifications of the APWA Manual shall be applied within the planning and urban design standards of this Chapter.
D. 
Streets And Sidewalks. Except as altered for particular contexts by application of the street design types and context appropriate street design standards in Section 404.010 and Appendix A,[1] all streets and sidewalks shall be constructed to the following Standard Specifications and Design Criteria, APWA 1981:
1. 
Arterials: Standard Drawing ST-3.
2. 
Collectors: Standard Drawing ST-2.
3. 
Local: Standard Drawing ST-1.
4. 
Sidewalks: SW-2. Sidewalks shall be constructed at the time of street construction along arterial and collector streets, but may be deferred until building permits are issued on local streets, provided that the developer enters into an agreement with the City to construct all sidewalks within three (3) years from the date of acceptance of the street, and record the agreement with the final plat. The agreement shall provide that upon notification by the City to the property owner sidewalks shall be built within sixty (60) days, weather permitting. Should sidewalks not be completed with that time period the City may proceed with sidewalk construction and by ordinance levy a special assessment against the property for the cost of construction. Sidewalks across private and commercial approaches will be the same thickness as the paved approach and will maintain less than two percent (2.0%) cross slope. Accessible routes across side streets and alleys will be less than two percent (2.0%) on new construction and reconstruction projects. Less than two percent (2.0%) cross slope will be maintained across streets and alleys where feasible on all alteration projects.
[Amended 3-7-2017 by Ord. No. 2890]
5. 
Streetlights. Streetlights shall be constructed as specified in the Standard Specifications and Design Criteria, APWA 1982.
6. 
Grades. In general, streets shall be so arranged that grades shall not exceed ten percent (10%) for major thoroughfares and fifteen percent (15%) for minor streets. The City Planning Commission may permit variation from these grades where it deems modifications advisable to adjust to topographic situations.
a. 
Gutter grades on paved gutters shall not be less than one-half of one percent (1/2 of 1%)
b. 
All changes in street grades shall be connected by a vertical curve of reasonable length to assure adequate visibility.
c. 
In approaching intersections, there should be a suitable leveling of the street at a grade generally not exceeding five percent (5%) and for a distance of generally not less than one hundred (100) feet from the nearest line of the intersecting street. The grade within the intersection should be as level as possible, permitting proper drainage.
7. 
Street Names. Streets shall use the names of other existing and named streets in alignment. Names of new streets or streets not in alignment with others shall show the names on the final plat and shall not duplicate or sound similar to existing street names. The City shall determine the street names and lot numbers.
8. 
Driveway approaches shall conform to the design specified in APWA 1997 Edition Standard Drawing D-1. Approaches must conform to one-fourth-inch to one-half-inch maximum slope within the right-of-way. The cross slopes of driveway approaches and sidewalks must measure a one-percent minimum to a two-percent maximum. Colored concrete or decorative driveway approaches may be installed to the curb with the following conditions:
[Amended 3-7-2017 by Ord. No. 2890]
a. 
The owner must pay for the special improvement and must otherwise be installed according to APWA standards.
b. 
The owner agrees to have continuing responsibility for contracting and installation of all such approaches requiring repairs due to utility, street, sewer or other such work; however, said utility, contractor or municipal contractor shall pay the amount of a standard APWA approach replacement to said owner; or if the owner does not want a decorative driveway any longer, a standard replacement approach will be installed in the affected drive by the said contractor.
[1]
Editor's Note: Appendix A is included as an attachment to this Title.
E. 
Water And Sanitary Sewer.
1. 
Where a public water main is reasonably accessible, connections between each lot and the water main shall be made in accordance with City standards.
2. 
Where a public sanitary sewer is reasonably accessible, connections between each lot and the sanitary sewer shall be made, sewer systems within the subdivision to make sanitary sewer accessible to each lot. Sewer systems shall be approved by the Board of Aldermen and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.
3. 
Where sanitary sewers are not available, other facilities, as approved by the Board of Aldermen and the Platte County Health Department, must be provided for the adequate disposal of sanitary wastes.
F. 
Storm Drainage. Culverts, storm sewer inlets, riprap slopes, stabilized ditches and other improvements shall be installed to handle stormwater adequately. Such improvements may be a part of a benefit district, may be installed by the applicant prior to building permit issuance on abutting land, or installation may be guaranteed by performance as may be negotiated with the governing body. All storm drainage facilities shall meet the specification and standards of the City, and be planned and designed according to the site design standards in Section 408.050.
G. 
Upsizing. Whenever any portions of the required public improvements are part of a planned future facility for the City, serving an area larger than the subdivision and its impact, the City and applicant will enter into an upsizing agreement. The City and the applicant shall negotiate the following aspects of the agreement prior to approval of the plat:
1. 
The applicant shall construct the facilities as planned by the City for future capacity as part of the subdivision and development process.
2. 
The applicant shall be responsible for the portion of the costs required to serve the proposed subdivision based on actual total cost to build the facilities absent any upsizing agreement.
3. 
The City shall be responsible for any incremental costs to expand the facility to the planned capacity beyond the capacity to serve the subdivision. The City's participation may be based by the applicant bidding the project with bid alternates, one (1) alternate to build the minimum required facility to serve the subdivision or development and the second bid alternate being for the upsized facility planned by the City.
4. 
The agreement shall be subject to approval by the City Attorney.
H. 
Permitting, Inspection And Acceptance. No work on required improvements shall be done unless the following regulations and provisions have first been complied with:
1. 
Plans and specifications for the private construction or repair of improvements, including but not limited shall be submitted to the Public Works Director for approval, along with the specified improvement permit fee.
2. 
A permit shall be obtained from the Public Works Director authorizing the construction according to plans and specifications submitted.
3. 
Following the issuance of the permit, construction shall not be started until the Public Works Director has been notified as to the time, location, and scope of the construction. All construction work may be stopped at any time by the Public Works Director, when in the opinion of the Public Works Director the workmanship, materials used, or procedures of work do not meet the requirements or comply with the City Code, ordinances, specifications and procedures for such work.
4. 
All permitted work shall be subject to final inspection for City maintenance by the Public Works Director who shall recommend action to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. No building permit shall be issued prior to the official acceptance of streets and sewers necessary to adequately serve such building.
5. 
Before acceptance by the City of streets or sewers, the owner shall post a maintenance bond, cash or irrevocable letter of credit satisfactory to the Board of Aldermen and in accordance with City policies and public works procedures, guaranteeing against defects in construction for a period of two (2) years.
6. 
Any private improvements, such as landscape islands, benches, trash cans, landscaping or subdivision monuments approved within the right-of-way shall have a right-of-way maintenance agreement signed by the developer and assigning responsibility to an association of property owners or any specific lot or property owner.